Samuel Greenlee1

Marriage*He married Nancy ______.1

Citations

  1. [S1272] Howard L. Leckey, The Tenmile Country and its Pioneer Families. A Genealogical History of the Upper Monongahela Valley (with surname index). (Apollo, Pennsylvania: Closson Press, August 1993), pages 291-292. Hereinafter cited as The Tenmile Country.

Esther Grethead1

Marriage*7 June 1605She married Edward Heaton, son of Edward Heaton, on 7 June 1605.1

Family

Edward Heaton b. 21 Jul 1587
Children1.Soloman Heaton1 b. 1606
2.Anthony Heaton1 b. 1611
3.Daniel Heaton1 b. 1612
4.Mary Heaton1 b. 1618
5.Frances Heaton1 b. 1621

Citations

  1. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, in two volumes, with indexes in Volume II. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, the information in these volumes often proves to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. (Tempe, Arizona: published for the author by Graphics of Tempe, 1999), Volume I, Chapter 1, pages 2-3. Hereinafter cited as Heaton Families II.

Hannah Grey1

Marriage*She married Enoch Williams.1

Family

Enoch Williams
Children1.Hannah Williams1 b. 1767, d. 29 Jul 1844
2.Margaret Williams+2 b. 24 May 1771, d. 15 Feb 1823

Citations

  1. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, in two volumes, with indexes in Volume II. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, the information in these volumes often proves to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. (Tempe, Arizona: published for the author by Graphics of Tempe, 1999), Volume I, Chapter 7, pages 245-246. Hereinafter cited as Heaton Families II.
  2. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, Volume I, Chapter 7, page 246.

Sophia Grey1

Marriage*She married Samuel Hayden.1
Residence*Sophia and Samuel Hayden lived in Youngstown, Mahoning County, Ohio.1

Family

Samuel Hayden
Child1.Daniel Hayden+1 b. 8 Sep 1806, d. 28 Jan 1881

Citations

  1. [S1416] Gilbert Cope, Henry Fishwick and Joseph Lemuel Chester, Genealogy of the Sharpless Family, descended from John and Jane Sharples, settlers near Chester, Pennsylvania, 1682 : together with some account of the English ancestry of the family, including the results of researches by Henry Fishwick, and the late Joseph Lemuel Chester, and a full report of the bi-centennial reunion of 1882, downloaded from the Family History Library at www.familysearch.org. John Sharples (d.1685) married Jane Moor and, as Quakers, the family emigrated in 1682 from England to Chester County, Pennsylvania. Descendants (spelling the surname Sharpless) and relatives lived in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and elsewhere. Includes ancestry in England to the 1200s A.D. Includes index. (Washington DC: Photoduplication Service, 1968 ( a microreoduction of the original published in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for the family, under the auspices of the Bi-centennial committee, in 1887), , pages 1114-1115. Hereinafter cited as Genealogy of the Sharpless Family.

Abigail Gridley1

Marriage*She married Joseph Dudley, son of Colonel William Dudley and Elizabeth Davenport.1
Children* From this collection, we learned Joseph's wife's full name. The couple had three children born in Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England). All three died in infancy, but Joseph was survived by his widow Abigail Gridley, who married John Gray in Boston in 1768. The Dudleys lived first in Roxbury, but had moved to Boston by 1763. Receipts for that year and the following year indicate he was renting "the mansion house in Cold Lane" from Thomas Fayerweather.1
(Wife) Death27 September 1767Abigail became a widow when Joseph Dudley died on 27 September 1767.2
Marriage*16 August 1768She married second John Gray on 16 August 1768 in Boston.1,3,4

Family 1

Joseph Dudley b. 1732, d. 27 Sep 1767

Family 2

John Gray

Citations

  1. [S1014] Joseph Dudley (1732-1767), NEHGS Manuscripts Collection, DUDLEY PAPERS (MSS 77, 1 Box, 146 items), New England Historic Genealogical Society, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  2. [S1013] Unidentified author, "Gov. Thomas Dudley and his Descendants", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 10, pages 133-142 and pages 337-340 (April and October 1856): page 339. Hereinafter cited as "Thomas Dudley and his Descendants."
  3. [S337] Massachusetts Marriages, 1633-1850, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Marriages, 1633-1850.
  4. [S979] Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988.

Ann Grier1

ChartsDescendants of John Hinds, including our Walters and Ralphs
Father*James Grier1
Residence*The Grier family lived in Creevy, County Longford, Ireland.2
Marriage*14 April 1774She married John Bell, son of Andrew Bell and Ann Clarke, shortly after 14 April 1774 according to a marriage settlement agreement. Note: The Kilmore Diocese transcription recorded the year as 1775 and the Andrew Bell source noted it as 1774.1,3
(Wife) Court Action9 April 1779A serious disagreement between Andrew Bell of Bellgrove and his eldest son John Bell of Creevy, who was encouraged by his wife Ann Bell and father-in-law James Grier, developed into a legal dispute in 1774 and ended up in the Court of Exchequer in Dublin, County Cavan. The plaintiff's Chancery Bill was filed on 9 April 1779. At the end of the court document a note was written which stated: "N.B. The Bill is very long, being 15 feet, took me nearly two hours to read it -- clauses repeated over and over again.-- P.C." What follows is a transcribed version of our understanding of the Chancery Bill:

Plaintiff Andrew Bell of Bellgrove, County Cavan, Esq. showed:

     That he, plaintiff, being in and before 1774 was seized of an estate of one part of the town and lands of Bellgrove alias Aghnacreevy, County Cavan containing 70 acres including bog land, land capable of being ploughed and used to grow crops, and pasture land, and also another part or half of said lands containing 70 like acres by virtue of lease made to plaintiff by John Maxwell Esq., since Lord Farnham, dated 08 August 1749 for lives of Bernard Parr, his brother John Bell and the plaintiff Andrew Bell, and the survivor of them, at £20, 10 shillings yearly rent; and being also seized in and before 1774 as of fee simple the lands of Kilnahard, County Cavan containing 18 acres.

     That a discussion of marriage was begun between John Bell, then of Bellgrove, the plaintiff's eldest son, with Anne Grier, elder daughter of James Grier of Creevy, County Longford, gentleman, wherefrom a marriage agreement was to be made between the plaintiff and his son and James Grier and his daughter.

     That James Grier was reputed in County Longford, where he lived, to be a man of good landed and real property and also possessed of a personal fortune of a considerable amount and, having but two daughters and no sons, the daughters of said James Grier were reputed to be entitled to a considerable fortune each, which induced the plaintiff, Andrew Bell, to agree to the marriage between his son John and Anne Grier.

     That pending said treaty of marriage, James Grier offered to give John Bell part of the portion he intended for his daughter Anne within 10 days after the marriage took effect, viz: £1,000 and to support and maintain John and Anne after the marriage in his own house at Creevy, and during such time as John and Anne should live and reside with James at Creevy, in as much as James was an infirm old man and not fit to attend to the care and labour of managing his family affairs, that John should manage them.

     That plaintiff, from his paternal love and affection for his son John and in order to advance him early in life, he (John) being at the time of the marriage only 18 years of age, agreed to settle said lands of Bellgrove and Kilnahard on John and his male heirs, subject to a jointure for Anne and a provision for younger children of the marriage, with remainder over to the plaintiff and his heirs.

     That Plaintiff also agreed to give Jon an annuity of £100 for his support until 01 May 1778.

     That in 1774 when the said treaty of marriage was depending, plaintiff was then married to Mary Bell alias Booth, his wife, the stepmother to said John, and plaintiff remembered having often mentioned to Mary, his then wife, that he intended by will or otherwise to leave Kilnahard to her for her life should she survive the plaintiff.

     That plaintiff, after he had entered into the discussions with James Grier, having considered over the promise he had made to his wife Mary of leaving Kilnahard to her for life, did not therefore think it right, proper or prudent to settle Kilnahard on John during Mary's lifetime.

     That plaintiff communicated to James Grier the difficulty he was under in regard to settling Kilnahard on his son John and absolutely told James Grier and John Bell he would not settle Kilnahard on John until after the death of his wife Mary.

     That when plaintiff informed James Grier and John Bell of said reason, they declared the reason was very proper and sufficient and were satisfied with the written agreement that John should have Kilnahard after the death of plaintiff's wife Mary.

     That in order to carry out this agreement, plaintiff executed a bond to James Grier and John Bell for £413 being the purchase money paid by the plaintiff for Kilnahard on the condition that said James and John should have possession of Kilnahard after the death of Mary, viz: that part of Kilnahard called Heney's part.

     That under the aforesaid covenant and before the marriage of John and Anne, articles of marriage were executed dated 14 April 1774 between said James Grier of Creevy, County Longford, gentleman of the first part, plaintiff Andrew Bell of Bellgrove, County Cavan and said John, his eldest son, of the second part and said Anne Grier, elder daughter of James of the third part, reciting said marriage to take place between John and Anne and her marriage portion of £1,000 to be paid by James to John whereby in consideration of same, plaintiff did agree to give to John his son the town and lands of Bellgrove alias Aghnacreevy, County Cavan as from 01 May 1778, that being in four years time, during which period plaintiff would pay John £100 per year for his support, said lands then to enure to John and his male heirs, chargeable with a jointure of £60 a year for Anne with remainder over to plaintiff and his heirs.

     That plaintiff did also execute a bond dated 14 April 1774 whereby plaintiff bound himself in the amount of £413 to James Grier and John Bell, the condition being that after the death of plaintiff's wife Mary Bell alias Booth, John Bell should enjoy that part of Kilnahard called Heney's part situate in County Cavan and containing about 18 acres.

     That for the aforesaid promise of plaintiff to his wife Mary, and for no other reason, was it that Kilnahard was not inserted in the marriage articles.

     That in a very short time after the perfection of the marriage articles the marriage took place.

     That plaintiff relied upon James Grier's promise to pay John Bell said £1,000 in 10 days after the marriage in as much as James Grier's property from his situation in life, having no other children but Anne and another daughter, that John would in the future receive a considerable fortune exceeding said £1,000 from Grier, and that was the reason which induced plaintiff to make the aforesaid settlement on John.

     That notwithstanding said marriage articles, James Grier did not pay the £1,000, nor to this hour has not paid same to John Bell and for that reason John Bell was often distressed for money to carry on his business.

     That owing to a desire to settle John favourably in life and relying upon the promise of James Grier to pay said £1,000 to John, that was the consideration which induced plaintiff to settle the lands on John, although plaintiff had a wife and a family of numerous children male and female so that the aforesaid settlement on John was not fair to the other children.

     That plaintiff did not doubt the honesty of the attorney who drew up the marriage articles and bond, who was a personal friend to both the plaintiff and James Grier. Neither did plaintiff doubt the honesty of Grier and John Bell to abide by said marriage articles.

     That plaintiff having a mind to provide for his wife Mary Bell alias Booth, the stepmother of John, and in order to keep it a secret from her that she would only have a life interest in Kilnahard, was the reason plaintiff executed said bond to James Grier and John Bell.

     That plaintiff's wife Mary Bell alias Booth died on 10 November 1774.

     That plaintiff paid the greater part of said £100 annuity to John Bell.

     That plaintiff, in order to carry out the covenants of the marriage articles and bond, did in September 1777 deliver to John Bell the several deeds, leases and other papers relative to plaintiff's title to the lands in order to draw up proper deeds of settlement, and often requested of both James Grier and John Bell to have said deeds executed pursuant to the marriage articles.

     That John Bell at length in January 1778 came to the plaintiff's house at Bellgrove, when plaintiff was very indisposed and ill in bed and in danger of his life and produced to plaintiff a deed of marriage settlement consisting of many sheets of paper and told plaintiff same was drafted by Thomas Bond, gentleman, the attorney for said John Bell and James Grier in the suits they have since that time severally commenced against the plaintiff at the insistence of and by the direction of Reverend Frederick Grier of Street, County Westmeath, clerk, the brother of said James Grier.

     That plaintiff from his weak state of health was not then able to read the deed until sometime after and John left it with the plaintiff.

     That when plaintiff got better he read the draft and found it was not agreeable to the marriage articles, purporting to be a deed of conveyance of plaintiff's lands and estates from plaintiff to John Bell and to said James and Frederick Grier in trust for John Bell and his heirs and assigns forever, and that it was prepared to defraud plaintiff and such of his other children as might survive John in case John should die without male issue.

     That plaintiff then objected to execute such deed it being contrary to the marriage articles.

     That plaintiff had lost his own counterpart of the marriage articles and James Grier sent word that John Bell would bring their copy of it to the Cavan Court in April 1778, where they would lay it before council for his opinion.

     That plaintiff, though in a very feeble state of health and at peril of his life, went to the Cavan Court of April 1778 and there met John, but John had not brought the marriage articles, but said he would go back home and fetch it back to Cavan the next day.

     That John went back to his house in County Longford and did not return to Cavan the next day, nor has he ever provided said marriage articles to the plaintiff for purposes aforesaid, despite plaintiff's repeated requests to do, and plaintiff pleads that had they done so he would give John possession of Bellgrove and Kilnahard and pay up the arrears of the annuity according to the marriage articles and bond.

     That John Bell acting under the influence of James Grier refused to bring the marriage articles.

     That notwithstanding the influence James Grier exercised over John and the expensive litigation which has since ensued, plaintiff from the affection to John, his eldest son, and in compassion for his youth, thinks it his duty to compel James Grier to pay the said £1,000 notwithstanding they have both harassed the plaintiff with litigation.

     That James Grier and James Bell on 03 July 1778 pled a declaration in the Court of Exchequer in an attempt to recover said £413 bond.

     That John Bell, Anne Bell alias Grier his wife and James Grier on 23 July 1778 filed their Bill in the Court of Exchequer against plaintiff claiming damages regarding the marriage articles.

     That they are still proceeding with their suits against plaintiff.

     That on 01 May 1778 plaintiff found his own counterpart of the marriage articles stowed away in an unsuspected place.

     That plaintiff attempted to have the dispute adjusted by friendly arbitration but James Grier has such ascendancy over John that same failed.

     That plaintiff, in Hilary (Spring) 1779, came to Dublin to put in his answer to said bill and also prepare his defense and, after his answer to said bill was engrossed, plaintiff's agent, Patrick Corbett informed plaintiff he had had some conversation with Thomas Bond, the attorney for James Grier and John Bell in order to come to an amicable compromise to restore peace and friendship between plaintiff and his son John.

     That accordingly plaintiff on 27 January last proposed to Thomas Bond that he would execute a deed of settlement of Bellgrove to John Bell with remainder over to his male heirs, with remainder over to plaintiff and his male heirs, and charged with a jointure of £60 for Anne and a £500 portion for younger children, and Thomas Bond was well satisfied with the agreement and recommended John Bell to execute same and end the dispute.

     That on 01 February last John Bell came to plaintiff in the Fair of Kilnaleck, County Cavan and said he would not accept the proposal unless plaintiff left Bellgrove with his family and gave full possession thereof to him (John) and then he would think of executing such deed.

     That plaintiff was very much surprised at such conduct of John and represented to John the extra ordinary terms he wanted from Plaintiff, viz: to turn plaintiff and his wife, who was then great with child and would deliver up in a few days after, and a numerous family of children, the brothers and sisters of John, and the season of the year, out of their dwelling house and oblige plaintiff with his family, furniture and cattle to leave Bellgrove and find a habitation elsewhere was very unnatural as plaintiff had no other residence.

     That plaintiff told John to have patience until 01 May next and he would give up possession of Bellgrove, but John would not comply and plaintiff had to refuse his request which was most unreasonable.

     That then James Grier and John Bell prosecuted their suit against plaintiff on 12 February 1779, entered rules in the Court of Exchequer as the compromise could not be arrived at, pressed for plaintiff's answer and on 01 March served plaintiff with notice threatening to eject him out of Bellgrove.

     That plaintiff made another attempt for a peaceful settlement, but John Bell this time swore violent oaths and would have none of them.

     Prays for writs of subpoena directed against John Bell, Anne Bell alias Grier, his wife, and James Grier to answer in the premises.2
No Issue*Ann and John Bell had no children.1
(Wife) Death1807Ann became a widow when John Bell Esq. died in the first half of 1807.4
(Widow) Probate30 June 1807Probates for the estates of father and son, Andrew Bell and Ann's husband John Bell, were both granted on 30 June 1807 with John's brother, Andrew's third son, Andrew Bell as executor for both. Andrew had been named sole executor in the will of his father dated in 1797 and John's will named both his wife Ann Bell and his brother Andrew as executors. Andrew, the father, had likely died shortly after writing his will in 1797 and his son Andrew delayed requesting probate until his brother John's death because of the serious dispute over his father's lands that had existed between his father and brother.4,5
(Widow) Estate and LandHer husband's will directed that his estate in Kilnahard, County Cavan, his lands or farm of upper Creevy in County Longford which he held in lease from Thomas Marley Esq. deceased, his lands and farm of Aghaboy, County Cavan which he held under Lord Farnham, the town and lands of Moyleroe, County Westmeath which he held under the Marquis of Buckingham, and his two freehold lands of Creeve being a lease of lives renewable forever, all be put in trust, and named Matthew Crawford Esq. and Reverend James Bond as trustees.

His beloved wife Ann Bell was to receive, for life, the profits from his estate in Kilnahard, his farm in upper Creevy and his farm of Aghaboy. After her death the line of succession was to begin with John's brother, their father's third son, Andrew Bell of Creevy, County Longford Esq. for his life, and then to John's nephew John Bell and his heirs, described in the will as the "now eldest son of his brother Andrew". The remaining succession was to be to the male heirs of his brother Andrew with "his present wife" Sarah Bell as his brother Andrew shall by will direct, with the further instruction that such son of his brother Andrew was to pay to his mother Sarah Bell an annuity of £20 per year for life. If his brother Andrew should die without male issue, then next in line was to be John's brother, their father's second son, Robert Bell Booth of Drumcarban, County Cavan and his heirs subject to the payments already mentioned.

His lands of Moyeroe in County Westmeath and Creeve in County Longford he left to his brother Andrew for his life and then to his eldest son John and his heirs, but also to be subject to an annuity of £20 per year to Andrew's wife Sarah for her life. As with the other lands, the remaining succession was to be to the male heirs of his brother Andrew, or with that failing then to his brother Robert and his heirs, subject to the payments mentioned. Later in the will, John stated again that should his brother Robert Bell Booth become possessed in succession, Robert was to pay Sarah, the wife of Andrew, £20 per year for her life.

John's will confirmed that his wife Ann Bell was entitled by their marriage settlement to an annuity of £60 per year for her life charged on his estate of Bellsgrove alias Aghnacreevy in County Cavan. Subject to that annuity, his will then devised the lands to his brother Robert Bell Booth and his heirs.

Then outside the trust, John left his title to his lands of Clooneen in County Longford to his wife Ann; £150 to his nieces Alicia Bell and Lettice Bell, the eldest and second daughters of his brother Andrew; his title to the farm of Clonoose in County Cavan which he held by lease from William Welch of Hilltown, County Westmeath, Esq. to his brother Andrew and his assigns forever, subject to Andrew paying the sum of £300 to their brother Robert; his title in Upper and Lower Ballinulty in County Longford to his brother Andrew and James Daly, attorney, son of John Daly of Granard, County Longford, merchant, for their own sole use; his title to his two fields at Cartrons in County Longford which he held under William Felk Grenville, containing about 12 acres, and also the profits accruing to him out of a field in Rathcronan in County Longford which he held under Richard Webb of Lisryan, Esq., and also the profits due to him out of the lands of Coolnagun in County Westmeath which he held by lease from Robert Sproule Esq. to his two nieces Mary Irwin and Margaret Irwin, daughters of John Irwin of Killeshandra, apothecary by his sister Mary Anne Irwin alias Bell, deceased. John directed in his will that the legacies to Mary and Margaret were to be used for their education until age 21 or marriage; and his title to his lands of Derrymacegan and Moneybeg in County Westmeath to his brother-in-law George Kerr of Clareisland, County Westmeath and his heirs.

Additional heirs included James Daly, Hugh Kerr, Simon Griffith, William Stratford, Francis Wise, John Keirnan and Mary Keirnan. To Hugh Kerr of Granard in County Longford, and his assigns forever, he bequeathed back the title to his farm of Bracklon in County Cavan which he held from Hugh Kerr; to Simon Griffith, also of Granard, he gave his title to the two fields of the lands of Cartrons in County Longford now in his possession containing 6 acres, and also his wearing apparel; to William Stratford and Francis Wise, as a token of their faithful service to him, he gave his title to the lands of Rathcronan now in their possession which was held by lease under Edmund Reilly of Ballaghgowla, County Longford; to John Keirnan, his servant, and his wife Mary Keirnan alias Wisal, he bequeathed £50.

The residue of his estate, real and personal, he bequeathed to his beloved wife Ann Bell and her heirs, and added that should counsel advise that his wife shall, after his decease, execute a release of title to her dower which she is entitled to out of his lands, and should she refuse to execute such release, then the bequests left to her shall be void.

John's will appointed his beloved wife Ann Bell and his brother Andrew Bell executors and was witnessed by L. R. Robertson, John Beatty and Richard Webb.

He added a codicil to his will that same day bequeathing all his furniture and concerns, and his carriages and concerns, to his beloved wife Ann Bell, and also her watch and ornaments, stating none of those items shall be subject to any debts.4

Family

John Bell b. 1756, d. 1807

Citations

  1. [S497] Marguerite Clayton (Michigan), compiler, "Hinds Family Research Collection" (Research results and analysis, letters and photos, in the possession of Shirley Ertz of Nebraska), Andrew Bell (d. 1755) Family Tree obtained from Beverley Mackey. Hereinafter cited as "Hinds Family Research Collection."
  2. [S1618] Crossle Genealogical Abstracts, online at Findmypast, www.findmypast.com, Chancery Bill, 1779, Andrew Bell of Bellgrove, County Cavan, Ireland, Plaintiff, John Bell, Anne (Grier) Bell and James Grier, Defendants. Hereinafter cited as Crossle Genealogical Abstracts.
  3. [S769] Listing of the Church of Ireland Index of Marriage License Bonds for the Diocese of Kilmore and Ardagh, online at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~adrian/…. Transcribed by Adrian Donley from the LDS FHL Film# 0100869 (Index to Church of Ireland diocesan marriage licenses). The register on the film contains 184 pages, each page with 16 entries, or approximately 2940 entries in total. It is in alphabetic order, indexed by surname of both bride and groom. Note: The site contains a partial transcription only. It contains approximately 68 of the 184 pages on the film. Hereinafter cited as Diocese of Kilmore and Ardagh Marriage Bond Index.
  4. [S1618] Crossle Genealogical Abstracts, online at www.findmypast.com, Prerogative will, John Bell, 1806, Creevy, County Longford, Ireland.
  5. [S1618] Crossle Genealogical Abstracts, online at www.findmypast.com, Prerogative will, Andrew Bell, 1797, Cottage, County Cavan, Ireland.

James Grier1

Residence*The Grier family lived in Creevy, County Longford, Ireland.2
(Father-in-Law) Court Action9 April 1779A serious disagreement between Andrew Bell of Bellgrove and his eldest son John Bell of Creevy, who was encouraged by his wife Ann Bell and father-in-law James Grier, developed into a legal dispute in 1774 and ended up in the Court of Exchequer in Dublin, County Cavan. The plaintiff's Chancery Bill was filed on 9 April 1779. At the end of the court document a note was written which stated: "N.B. The Bill is very long, being 15 feet, took me nearly two hours to read it -- clauses repeated over and over again.-- P.C." What follows is a transcribed version of our understanding of the Chancery Bill:

Plaintiff Andrew Bell of Bellgrove, County Cavan, Esq. showed:

     That he, plaintiff, being in and before 1774 was seized of an estate of one part of the town and lands of Bellgrove alias Aghnacreevy, County Cavan containing 70 acres including bog land, land capable of being ploughed and used to grow crops, and pasture land, and also another part or half of said lands containing 70 like acres by virtue of lease made to plaintiff by John Maxwell Esq., since Lord Farnham, dated 08 August 1749 for lives of Bernard Parr, his brother John Bell and the plaintiff Andrew Bell, and the survivor of them, at £20, 10 shillings yearly rent; and being also seized in and before 1774 as of fee simple the lands of Kilnahard, County Cavan containing 18 acres.

     That a discussion of marriage was begun between John Bell, then of Bellgrove, the plaintiff's eldest son, with Anne Grier, elder daughter of James Grier of Creevy, County Longford, gentleman, wherefrom a marriage agreement was to be made between the plaintiff and his son and James Grier and his daughter.

     That James Grier was reputed in County Longford, where he lived, to be a man of good landed and real property and also possessed of a personal fortune of a considerable amount and, having but two daughters and no sons, the daughters of said James Grier were reputed to be entitled to a considerable fortune each, which induced the plaintiff, Andrew Bell, to agree to the marriage between his son John and Anne Grier.

     That pending said treaty of marriage, James Grier offered to give John Bell part of the portion he intended for his daughter Anne within 10 days after the marriage took effect, viz: £1,000 and to support and maintain John and Anne after the marriage in his own house at Creevy, and during such time as John and Anne should live and reside with James at Creevy, in as much as James was an infirm old man and not fit to attend to the care and labour of managing his family affairs, that John should manage them.

     That plaintiff, from his paternal love and affection for his son John and in order to advance him early in life, he (John) being at the time of the marriage only 18 years of age, agreed to settle said lands of Bellgrove and Kilnahard on John and his male heirs, subject to a jointure for Anne and a provision for younger children of the marriage, with remainder over to the plaintiff and his heirs.

     That Plaintiff also agreed to give Jon an annuity of £100 for his support until 01 May 1778.

     That in 1774 when the said treaty of marriage was depending, plaintiff was then married to Mary Bell alias Booth, his wife, the stepmother to said John, and plaintiff remembered having often mentioned to Mary, his then wife, that he intended by will or otherwise to leave Kilnahard to her for her life should she survive the plaintiff.

     That plaintiff, after he had entered into the discussions with James Grier, having considered over the promise he had made to his wife Mary of leaving Kilnahard to her for life, did not therefore think it right, proper or prudent to settle Kilnahard on John during Mary's lifetime.

     That plaintiff communicated to James Grier the difficulty he was under in regard to settling Kilnahard on his son John and absolutely told James Grier and John Bell he would not settle Kilnahard on John until after the death of his wife Mary.

     That when plaintiff informed James Grier and John Bell of said reason, they declared the reason was very proper and sufficient and were satisfied with the written agreement that John should have Kilnahard after the death of plaintiff's wife Mary.

     That in order to carry out this agreement, plaintiff executed a bond to James Grier and John Bell for £413 being the purchase money paid by the plaintiff for Kilnahard on the condition that said James and John should have possession of Kilnahard after the death of Mary, viz: that part of Kilnahard called Heney's part.

     That under the aforesaid covenant and before the marriage of John and Anne, articles of marriage were executed dated 14 April 1774 between said James Grier of Creevy, County Longford, gentleman of the first part, plaintiff Andrew Bell of Bellgrove, County Cavan and said John, his eldest son, of the second part and said Anne Grier, elder daughter of James of the third part, reciting said marriage to take place between John and Anne and her marriage portion of £1,000 to be paid by James to John whereby in consideration of same, plaintiff did agree to give to John his son the town and lands of Bellgrove alias Aghnacreevy, County Cavan as from 01 May 1778, that being in four years time, during which period plaintiff would pay John £100 per year for his support, said lands then to enure to John and his male heirs, chargeable with a jointure of £60 a year for Anne with remainder over to plaintiff and his heirs.

     That plaintiff did also execute a bond dated 14 April 1774 whereby plaintiff bound himself in the amount of £413 to James Grier and John Bell, the condition being that after the death of plaintiff's wife Mary Bell alias Booth, John Bell should enjoy that part of Kilnahard called Heney's part situate in County Cavan and containing about 18 acres.

     That for the aforesaid promise of plaintiff to his wife Mary, and for no other reason, was it that Kilnahard was not inserted in the marriage articles.

     That in a very short time after the perfection of the marriage articles the marriage took place.

     That plaintiff relied upon James Grier's promise to pay John Bell said £1,000 in 10 days after the marriage in as much as James Grier's property from his situation in life, having no other children but Anne and another daughter, that John would in the future receive a considerable fortune exceeding said £1,000 from Grier, and that was the reason which induced plaintiff to make the aforesaid settlement on John.

     That notwithstanding said marriage articles, James Grier did not pay the £1,000, nor to this hour has not paid same to John Bell and for that reason John Bell was often distressed for money to carry on his business.

     That owing to a desire to settle John favourably in life and relying upon the promise of James Grier to pay said £1,000 to John, that was the consideration which induced plaintiff to settle the lands on John, although plaintiff had a wife and a family of numerous children male and female so that the aforesaid settlement on John was not fair to the other children.

     That plaintiff did not doubt the honesty of the attorney who drew up the marriage articles and bond, who was a personal friend to both the plaintiff and James Grier. Neither did plaintiff doubt the honesty of Grier and John Bell to abide by said marriage articles.

     That plaintiff having a mind to provide for his wife Mary Bell alias Booth, the stepmother of John, and in order to keep it a secret from her that she would only have a life interest in Kilnahard, was the reason plaintiff executed said bond to James Grier and John Bell.

     That plaintiff's wife Mary Bell alias Booth died on 10 November 1774.

     That plaintiff paid the greater part of said £100 annuity to John Bell.

     That plaintiff, in order to carry out the covenants of the marriage articles and bond, did in September 1777 deliver to John Bell the several deeds, leases and other papers relative to plaintiff's title to the lands in order to draw up proper deeds of settlement, and often requested of both James Grier and John Bell to have said deeds executed pursuant to the marriage articles.

     That John Bell at length in January 1778 came to the plaintiff's house at Bellgrove, when plaintiff was very indisposed and ill in bed and in danger of his life and produced to plaintiff a deed of marriage settlement consisting of many sheets of paper and told plaintiff same was drafted by Thomas Bond, gentleman, the attorney for said John Bell and James Grier in the suits they have since that time severally commenced against the plaintiff at the insistence of and by the direction of Reverend Frederick Grier of Street, County Westmeath, clerk, the brother of said James Grier.

     That plaintiff from his weak state of health was not then able to read the deed until sometime after and John left it with the plaintiff.

     That when plaintiff got better he read the draft and found it was not agreeable to the marriage articles, purporting to be a deed of conveyance of plaintiff's lands and estates from plaintiff to John Bell and to said James and Frederick Grier in trust for John Bell and his heirs and assigns forever, and that it was prepared to defraud plaintiff and such of his other children as might survive John in case John should die without male issue.

     That plaintiff then objected to execute such deed it being contrary to the marriage articles.

     That plaintiff had lost his own counterpart of the marriage articles and James Grier sent word that John Bell would bring their copy of it to the Cavan Court in April 1778, where they would lay it before council for his opinion.

     That plaintiff, though in a very feeble state of health and at peril of his life, went to the Cavan Court of April 1778 and there met John, but John had not brought the marriage articles, but said he would go back home and fetch it back to Cavan the next day.

     That John went back to his house in County Longford and did not return to Cavan the next day, nor has he ever provided said marriage articles to the plaintiff for purposes aforesaid, despite plaintiff's repeated requests to do, and plaintiff pleads that had they done so he would give John possession of Bellgrove and Kilnahard and pay up the arrears of the annuity according to the marriage articles and bond.

     That John Bell acting under the influence of James Grier refused to bring the marriage articles.

     That notwithstanding the influence James Grier exercised over John and the expensive litigation which has since ensued, plaintiff from the affection to John, his eldest son, and in compassion for his youth, thinks it his duty to compel James Grier to pay the said £1,000 notwithstanding they have both harassed the plaintiff with litigation.

     That James Grier and James Bell on 03 July 1778 pled a declaration in the Court of Exchequer in an attempt to recover said £413 bond.

     That John Bell, Anne Bell alias Grier his wife and James Grier on 23 July 1778 filed their Bill in the Court of Exchequer against plaintiff claiming damages regarding the marriage articles.

     That they are still proceeding with their suits against plaintiff.

     That on 01 May 1778 plaintiff found his own counterpart of the marriage articles stowed away in an unsuspected place.

     That plaintiff attempted to have the dispute adjusted by friendly arbitration but James Grier has such ascendancy over John that same failed.

     That plaintiff, in Hilary (Spring) 1779, came to Dublin to put in his answer to said bill and also prepare his defense and, after his answer to said bill was engrossed, plaintiff's agent, Patrick Corbett informed plaintiff he had had some conversation with Thomas Bond, the attorney for James Grier and John Bell in order to come to an amicable compromise to restore peace and friendship between plaintiff and his son John.

     That accordingly plaintiff on 27 January last proposed to Thomas Bond that he would execute a deed of settlement of Bellgrove to John Bell with remainder over to his male heirs, with remainder over to plaintiff and his male heirs, and charged with a jointure of £60 for Anne and a £500 portion for younger children, and Thomas Bond was well satisfied with the agreement and recommended John Bell to execute same and end the dispute.

     That on 01 February last John Bell came to plaintiff in the Fair of Kilnaleck, County Cavan and said he would not accept the proposal unless plaintiff left Bellgrove with his family and gave full possession thereof to him (John) and then he would think of executing such deed.

     That plaintiff was very much surprised at such conduct of John and represented to John the extra ordinary terms he wanted from Plaintiff, viz: to turn plaintiff and his wife, who was then great with child and would deliver up in a few days after, and a numerous family of children, the brothers and sisters of John, and the season of the year, out of their dwelling house and oblige plaintiff with his family, furniture and cattle to leave Bellgrove and find a habitation elsewhere was very unnatural as plaintiff had no other residence.

     That plaintiff told John to have patience until 01 May next and he would give up possession of Bellgrove, but John would not comply and plaintiff had to refuse his request which was most unreasonable.

     That then James Grier and John Bell prosecuted their suit against plaintiff on 12 February 1779, entered rules in the Court of Exchequer as the compromise could not be arrived at, pressed for plaintiff's answer and on 01 March served plaintiff with notice threatening to eject him out of Bellgrove.

     That plaintiff made another attempt for a peaceful settlement, but John Bell this time swore violent oaths and would have none of them.

     Prays for writs of subpoena directed against John Bell, Anne Bell alias Grier, his wife, and James Grier to answer in the premises.2

Family

Child1.Ann Grier1

Citations

  1. [S497] Marguerite Clayton (Michigan), compiler, "Hinds Family Research Collection" (Research results and analysis, letters and photos, in the possession of Shirley Ertz of Nebraska), Andrew Bell (d. 1755) Family Tree obtained from Beverley Mackey. Hereinafter cited as "Hinds Family Research Collection."
  2. [S1618] Crossle Genealogical Abstracts, online at Findmypast, www.findmypast.com, Chancery Bill, 1779, Andrew Bell of Bellgrove, County Cavan, Ireland, Plaintiff, John Bell, Anne (Grier) Bell and James Grier, Defendants. Hereinafter cited as Crossle Genealogical Abstracts.

Etta Griffin1

b. 17 October 1873
ChartsDescendants of Nicholas Boulton, The Immigrant
Descendants of John Bolton and Zilpah Peirce
Birth*17 October 1873Etta Griffin was born on 17 October 1873.1
Marriage*8 January 1893She married Clarence Herbert Webb Spicer, son of Alexander Russell Webb and Laura Cordelia Conger, on 8 January 1893.1

Family

Clarence Herbert Webb Spicer b. 25 May 1873
Children1.Everett Spicer1 b. 4 Mar 1894, d. 19 Jan 1895
2.Senia Ray Spicer1 b. 4 Apr 1897
3.Laurie Russell Spicer1 b. 10 Sep 1900

Citations

  1. [S616] Charles G.B. Conger, Descendant, compiler, downloaded from Google Books, A Record of the Births, Marriages and Deaths of the Descendants of John Conger of Woodbridge, N.J. (Chicago, Illinois: Shea Smith, Descendant, 1903), page 114. Hereinafter cited as John Conger Descendants, BMD.

Jane Griffin1

Marriage*14 March 1748She married as his first wife Ebenezer Edson, son of Samuel Edson and Mary ______, on 14 March 1748 in Bridgewater, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1,2

Family

Ebenezer Edson b. 7 Dec 1727

Citations

  1. [S474] Nahum Mitchell, History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, including an extensive Family Register. Note: page numbers differ slightly between publications used in our research, including FHL copy, Google Books, Boston Public Library EBooks online and our personal library reprint published by Heritage Books. (Baltimore, Maryland: Gateway Press, Inc., original publication date was 1840; reprinted for the third and fourth times in 1970 and 1975; first reprinted in 1897 by Henry T. Pratt, Bridgewater, Massachusetts; originally printed in 1840 by Kidder and Wright, Boston, Massachusetts), Edson, pages 153-160. Hereinafter cited as History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater.
  2. [S836] New England Historic Genealogical Society, compiler, downloaded from Google Books, Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts to the Year 1850. In two Volumes: Volume I. Births and Volume II. Marriages and Deaths. (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1916), Volume II, Marriages, page 122. Hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts to 1850.

Zedonia Griffin1

ChartsDescendants of John Heaton of Lincolnshire, including the Immigrant Nathaniel
Marriage*He married, as her first husband, Rachel Heaton, daughter of Daniel Heaton and Ruth Wadsworth.1

Family

Rachel Heaton b. 1740, d. 1790

Citations

  1. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, in two volumes, with indexes in Volume II. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, the information in these volumes often proves to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. (Tempe, Arizona: published for the author by Graphics of Tempe, 1999), Volume I, Chapter 4, pages 122-123. Hereinafter cited as Heaton Families II.

A. Griffith1

(Witness to Will) Estate George’s will bequeathed 5 shillings to his eldest son Richard Bell, explaining that Richard had already been provided for by his marriage settlement. To his dearly beloved wife Essey Bell alias Archer he bequeathed the remainder of his property whatsoever, real and personal, and all monies, lands and concerns he was entitled to, to be by her divided and disposed of among his younger children as she thinks proper, and should she die without making such dispositions, the same equally between his said younger children. George appointed his said wife sole executrix, and his will was witnessed by George Johnston, Edmond Gould and A. Griffith.1

Citations

  1. [S1618] Crossle Genealogical Abstracts, online at Findmypast, www.findmypast.com, Prerogative will, George Bell, 1809, Killynure, County Cavan, Ireland. Hereinafter cited as Crossle Genealogical Abstracts.

Ann Griffith1

ChartsDescendants of Robert Heaton of Yorkshire, The Immigrant
Father*John Griffith1
Marriage*7 July 1696She married James Heaton, son of Robert Heaton and Alice Ricroft, on 7 July 1696.1
Relocation*After their marriage, Ann and James Heaton moved to New Jersey where James operated a mill and ferry in Hopewell Township, Burlington County.1

Family

James Heaton b. 25 Feb 1674/75, d. 1709

Citations

  1. [S1399] Heaton. A well researched and partially documented work on the earliest Heaton immigrants to Pennsylvania, from Yorkshire, England, in 1682. Some of the information from the website is presented here in acknowledgement that not all of the early Heatons to America were "our" Heatons, and specifically to remind us of the reasons for the confusion expressed by our Heaton family researchers over the years as they tried to distinguish between the Lincolnshire John Heaton and the Yorkshire John Heaton, the two John Heatons of Loudon County, Virginia. Online at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/…, MJP Grundy (email: e-mail address); viewed on 7 July 2015.

James Griffith1

(Witness to Will) Estate and LandJames Griffith witnessed the will of John Bell of Killynure, County Cavan, Ireland, on 14 June 1786.1

Citations

  1. [S1618] Crossle Genealogical Abstracts, online at Findmypast, www.findmypast.com, Prerogative will, John Bell, 1786, Killynure, County Cavan, Ireland. Hereinafter cited as Crossle Genealogical Abstracts.

John Griffith1

Family

Child1.Ann Griffith1

Citations

  1. [S1399] Heaton. A well researched and partially documented work on the earliest Heaton immigrants to Pennsylvania, from Yorkshire, England, in 1682. Some of the information from the website is presented here in acknowledgement that not all of the early Heatons to America were "our" Heatons, and specifically to remind us of the reasons for the confusion expressed by our Heaton family researchers over the years as they tried to distinguish between the Lincolnshire John Heaton and the Yorkshire John Heaton, the two John Heatons of Loudon County, Virginia. Online at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/…, MJP Grundy (email: e-mail address); viewed on 7 July 2015.

Nathaniel Griffith1

Family

Child1.Sarah Griffith1

Citations

  1. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, in two volumes, with indexes in Volume II. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, the information in these volumes often proves to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. (Tempe, Arizona: published for the author by Graphics of Tempe, 1999), Volume I, Chapter 18, page 647. Hereinafter cited as Heaton Families II.

Sarah Griffith1

ChartsDescendants of Robert Heaton of Yorkshire, The Immigrant
Father*Nathaniel Griffith1
Marriage*15 November 1749She married Robert Heaton, son of Robert Heaton and Margaret Davis, on 15 November 1749.1
(Wife) Death1787Sarah became a widow when Robert Heaton died in 1787 at about age 47.2,1

Family

Robert Heaton b. 24 Nov 1740, d. 1787

Citations

  1. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, in two volumes, with indexes in Volume II. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, the information in these volumes often proves to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. (Tempe, Arizona: published for the author by Graphics of Tempe, 1999), Volume I, Chapter 18, page 647. Hereinafter cited as Heaton Families II.
  2. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, Volume I, Chapter 18, page 646.

Simon Griffith1

Residence*8 December 1806He was identified on 8 December 1806 as of Granard, County Longford, Ireland.1
(Heir) Estate and LandSimon Griffith was named as an heir in the will of John Bell of Creevy, dated 08 December 1806. John gave him his title to the two fields of the lands of Cartrons in County Longford now in Simon's possession containing 6 acres, and also his wearing apparel.1

Citations

  1. [S1618] Crossle Genealogical Abstracts, online at Findmypast, www.findmypast.com, Prerogative will, John Bell, 1806, Creevy, County Longford, Ireland. Hereinafter cited as Crossle Genealogical Abstracts.

Susanna Griffith1,2

b. 1681, d. 30 December 1770
ChartsDescendants of Robert Heaton of Yorkshire, The Immigrant
Birth*1681Susanna Griffith was born in 1681 in England.3
Marriage*She married first James Carter in Pennsylvania.3
(Wife) Deathbefore 3 November 1720Susanna became a widow when James Carter died.1
Marriage*3 November 1720She married second, as his second wife, Robert Heaton, son of Robert Heaton and Alice Ricroft, on 3 November 1720 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.4,5,6
Children*May 1721Susanna and Robert Heaton were disciplined by the Society of Friends for delivering a full-term child six months after their marriage. No information about the child was found in the meeting records.2
(Wife) Death17 March 1743Susanna became a widow when Robert Heaton Jr. died on 17 March 1743.2,1
Death*30 December 1770She died on 30 December 1770 in Bucks County.1

Family 1

James Carter b. 1675, d. b 3 Nov 1720

Family 2

Robert Heaton Jr. b. 3 Aug 1671, d. 17 Mar 1743

Citations

  1. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, in two volumes, with indexes in Volume II. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, the information in these volumes often proves to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. (Tempe, Arizona: published for the author by Graphics of Tempe, 1999), Volume I, Chapter 18, pages 643-644. Hereinafter cited as Heaton Families II.
  2. [S1399] Heaton. A well researched and partially documented work on the earliest Heaton immigrants to Pennsylvania, from Yorkshire, England, in 1682. Some of the information from the website is presented here in acknowledgement that not all of the early Heatons to America were "our" Heatons, and specifically to remind us of the reasons for the confusion expressed by our Heaton family researchers over the years as they tried to distinguish between the Lincolnshire John Heaton and the Yorkshire John Heaton, the two John Heatons of Loudon County, Virginia. Online at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/…, MJP Grundy (email: e-mail address); viewed on 7 July 2015.
  3. [S1612] U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900.
  4. [S1424] U.S. Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, online at www.ancestry.com, Middletown Monthly Meeting, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Minutes, 1683-1892, transcribing the date of their marriage from the original Quaker entry of "3 of the Ninth 1720" which would have been 3 November 1720. Hereinafter cited as U.S. Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935.
  5. [S1399] Heaton, online at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/…, noting the date of their marriage as October 1720.
  6. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, Volume I, Chapter 18, pages 643-644, noting the date of their marriage as 6 August 1720.

John Gross1

Marriage*17 April 1710He married, as her first husband, Hannah Nutting of Cambridge, daughter of Jonathan Nutting and Elizabeth ______, on 17 April 1710 in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1,2

Citations

  1. [S1245] Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts 1630-1877 with a Genealogical Register, downloaded from the Boston Public Library EBooks and Texts Archive at www.archive.org. (Boston, Massachusetts: H.O. Houghton and Company, 1877), Nutting Family, pages 615-616. Hereinafter cited as History of Cambridge, Massachusetts.
  2. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Cambridge Marriages, Volume 2, page 289. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.

Charity Grubb1

b. 29 September 1687, d. 27 November 1761
Father*John Grubb2
Mother*Frances Vane2
Birth*29 September 1687Charity Grubb was born on 29 September 1687.1
Marriage*24 October 1706She married Richard Beeson, son of Edward Beeson and Rachel Pennington, on 24 October 1706 in Pennsylvania.1,2
Death*27 November 1761She died on 27 November 1761 in Guilford County, North Carolina, at age 74.1

Family

Richard Beeson b. 10 Oct 1684, d. 1 Jan 1777
Children1.Benjamin Beeson+1
2.Richard Beeson+3 d. 1748
3.William Beeson+3 b. 30 Jan 1722, d. 18 Dec 1760

Citations

  1. [S1510] Henry Hart Beeson, A Genealogy of the Beeson - Beason Family, downloaded from the Family History Library at www.familysearch.org. Edward Beeson immigrated to America in 1682 or 1684 from Stoke, Lancaster, England and settled in New Castle, Delaware. He married Rachel Pennington and they had four children. He married Elizabeth and they had two children. Descendants and relatives lived mainly in Delaware, Ohio, Indiana, Alabama and Texas. Includes index. (Houston, Texas: H.H. Beeson, 1968), pages 8-9. Hereinafter cited as Genealogy of the Beeson - Beason Family.
  2. [S1510] Henry Hart Beeson, Genealogy of the Beeson - Beason Family, page 4.
  3. [S1510] Henry Hart Beeson, Genealogy of the Beeson - Beason Family, page 8.

John Grubb1

Marriage*He married Frances Vane.1

Family

Frances Vane
Child1.Charity Grubb+1 b. 29 Sep 1687, d. 27 Nov 1761

Citations

  1. [S1510] Henry Hart Beeson, A Genealogy of the Beeson - Beason Family, downloaded from the Family History Library at www.familysearch.org. Edward Beeson immigrated to America in 1682 or 1684 from Stoke, Lancaster, England and settled in New Castle, Delaware. He married Rachel Pennington and they had four children. He married Elizabeth and they had two children. Descendants and relatives lived mainly in Delaware, Ohio, Indiana, Alabama and Texas. Includes index. (Houston, Texas: H.H. Beeson, 1968), page 4. Hereinafter cited as Genealogy of the Beeson - Beason Family.

Jacob Guest1

Marriage*10 August 1797He married Irene Colver, daughter of Simon Colver and (?) Jemima Tuttle, on 10 August 1797.1

Family

Irene Colver b. 1780

Citations

  1. [S1393] Alva M. Tuttle, Tuttle - Tuthill Lines in America, downloaded from the Family History Library at www.familysearch.org. (Cleveland, Ohio: published by the compiler, 1968), page 300. Hereinafter cited as Tuttle - Tuthill Lines in America.

Joseph Guild1

ChartsDescendants of John Heaton of Lincolnshire, including the Immigrant Nathaniel
Marriage*24 March 1736/37He married Abigail Heaton, daughter of Nathaniel Heaton and Mariah Morse, on 24 March 1736/37 in Wrentham.1,2

Family

Abigail Heaton b. 19 May 1719

Citations

  1. [S43] Dean Heaton, The Heaton Families: 350 Years in America. Contains index. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, the information in this work often proves to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. (111 Water Street, Baltimore, MD 21202: Gateway Press, Inc., 1982), Chapter 2, page 12. Hereinafter cited as The Heaton Families: 350 Years in America.
  2. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Wrentham Marriages, Volume 2, page 309. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.

Anthony Gulliver1

Residence*29 October 1675At the time of his daughter Lydia's marriage on 29 October 1675, Anthony resided in Milton, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England).1

Family

Child1.Lydia Gulliver+1 b. c 1659, d. 24 Jul 1705

Citations

  1. [S1142] Wm. R. Deane, Genealogical Memoir of the Leonard Family containing a full account of the first three generations of the family of James Leonard, who was an early settler of Taunton, MS. (Massachusetts), downloaded from the Boston Public Library EBooks and Texts Archive at www.archive.org. (Boston, Massachusetts: Office of the New England Historic-Genealogical Register, 1851), Genealogy, page 17. Hereinafter cited as The Family of James Leonard of Taunton.

John Gulliver1

Marriage*28 March 1717He married, as her first husband, Lydia Gulliver, daughter of Jonathan Gulliver and Mary Robertson, on 28 March 1717 in Milton, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1,2

Family

Lydia Gulliver b. 14 Jun 1698

Citations

  1. [S1142] Wm. R. Deane, Genealogical Memoir of the Leonard Family containing a full account of the first three generations of the family of James Leonard, who was an early settler of Taunton, MS. (Massachusetts), downloaded from the Boston Public Library EBooks and Texts Archive at www.archive.org. (Boston, Massachusetts: Office of the New England Historic-Genealogical Register, 1851), Genealogy, page 18. Hereinafter cited as The Family of James Leonard of Taunton.
  2. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Milton, Marriages, page 127. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.

Jonathan Gulliver1

Marriage*17 January 1686He married Mary Robertson of Dorchester on 17 January 1686 in Milton, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England).2

Family

Mary Robertson
Child1.Lydia Gulliver3,1 b. 14 Jun 1698

Citations

  1. [S1142] Wm. R. Deane, Genealogical Memoir of the Leonard Family containing a full account of the first three generations of the family of James Leonard, who was an early settler of Taunton, MS. (Massachusetts), downloaded from the Boston Public Library EBooks and Texts Archive at www.archive.org. (Boston, Massachusetts: Office of the New England Historic-Genealogical Register, 1851), Genealogy, page 18. Hereinafter cited as The Family of James Leonard of Taunton.
  2. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Milton, Marriages, page 127. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  3. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Milton, Births, page 30.

Lydia Gulliver1

b. circa 1659, d. 24 July 1705
Father*Anthony Gulliver1
Birth*circa 1659Lydia Gulliver was born circa 1659, as calculated from her noted age at death.1
Marriage*29 October 1675She married, as his second wife, James Leonard Jr. of Taunton, son of James Leonard and Mary Jane Martin, on 29 October 1675.1
Death*24 July 1705She died on 24 July 1705 in her 47th year.1

Family

James Leonard Jr. b. c 1643, d. 1 Nov 1726
Children1.James Leonard2 b. 11 May 1677, d. 16 Jan 1764
2.Lydia Leonard2 b. 10 Mar 1679
3.Stephen Leonard2 b. 14 Dec 1680
4.Abigail Leonard2 b. 30 Jan 1682, d. b 4 Mar 1725/26
5.Nathaniel Leonard2 b. 18 Mar 1685, d. 11 Jun 1685
6.Seth Leonard3 b. 3 Apr 1686
7.Sarah Leonard3,2 b. 6 Sep 1688
8.Mehitabel Leonard4,2 b. 24 Oct 1691, d. 10 Jun 1695
9.Elizabeth Leonard5,2 b. 19 Apr 1694, d. 9 Oct 1750

Citations

  1. [S1142] Wm. R. Deane, Genealogical Memoir of the Leonard Family containing a full account of the first three generations of the family of James Leonard, who was an early settler of Taunton, MS. (Massachusetts), downloaded from the Boston Public Library EBooks and Texts Archive at www.archive.org. (Boston, Massachusetts: Office of the New England Historic-Genealogical Register, 1851), Genealogy, page 17. Hereinafter cited as The Family of James Leonard of Taunton.
  2. [S1142] Wm. R. Deane, The Family of James Leonard of Taunton, Genealogy, pages 17-18.
  3. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Taunton, Volume 1, Births, page 258. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  4. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Taunton, Volume 1, Births, page 256.
  5. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Taunton, Volume 1, Births, page 251.

Lydia Gulliver1

b. 14 June 1698
Father*Jonathan Gulliver2,1
Mother*Mary Robertson2
Birth*14 June 1698Lydia Gulliver was born on 14 June 1698 in Milton, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).2
Marriage*28 March 1717She married first John Gulliver on 28 March 1717 in Milton, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1,3
Marriage*14 December 1726She married second, as his second wife, James Leonard of Taunton, son of James Leonard Jr. and Lydia Gulliver, on 14 December 1726 in Taunton, Bristol County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).4,5,1

Family 1

John Gulliver

Family 2

James Leonard b. 11 May 1677, d. 16 Jan 1764

Citations

  1. [S1142] Wm. R. Deane, Genealogical Memoir of the Leonard Family containing a full account of the first three generations of the family of James Leonard, who was an early settler of Taunton, MS. (Massachusetts), downloaded from the Boston Public Library EBooks and Texts Archive at www.archive.org. (Boston, Massachusetts: Office of the New England Historic-Genealogical Register, 1851), Genealogy, page 18. Hereinafter cited as The Family of James Leonard of Taunton.
  2. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Milton, Births, page 30. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  3. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Milton, Marriages, page 127.
  4. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Taunton, Volume 2, Marriages, page 292.
  5. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Milton, Marriages, page 145.

Mehitabel Gunn1

b. 28 July 1644
Father*Thomas Gunn2
Birth*28 July 1644Mehitabel Gunn was born on 28 July 1644 in Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut.1,3
Marriage*22 October 1663She married, with parental consent, as his first wife, David Ensign, son of James Ensign, on 22 October 1663 in Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut.1,2
Divorce*1682Mehitabel and David Ensign were divorced in 1682.1

Family

David Ensign b. c 1646, d. 13 Dec 1727
Children1.David Ensign2 b. 16 Nov 1664
2.Sarah Ensign4 b. 22 Jan 1671
3.Mary Ensign5 b. 26 Jan 1674

Citations

  1. [S1394] Donald Lines Jacobus, "Culver and Winthrop", The American Genealogist, Volume 22, pages 107-110 (July 1945). Hereinafter cited as "Culver and Winthrop."
  2. [S550] Connecticut vital records (Jacquelyn L. Ricker), The Ricker compilation of vital records of early Connecticut : based on the Barbour Collection of Connecticut town vital records and other statistical sources, CD-ROM (Salt Lake City, Utah: Genealogical Publishing Co., c2006), Available now directly from computers located in the FHL, page 4467, citing Hartford Vital Records. Hereinafter cited as Ricker compilation of Connecticut vital records.
  3. [S550] Connecticut vital records (Jacquelyn L. Ricker), Ricker compilation of Connecticut vital records, page 5668, citing Windsor Vital Records.
  4. [S550] Connecticut vital records (Jacquelyn L. Ricker), Ricker compilation of Connecticut vital records, page 4471, citing Hartford Vital Records.
  5. [S550] Connecticut vital records (Jacquelyn L. Ricker), Ricker compilation of Connecticut vital records, page 4470, citing Hartford Vital Records.

Thomas Gunn1

Family

Child1.Mehitabel Gunn+1 b. 28 Jul 1644

Citations

  1. [S550] Connecticut vital records (Jacquelyn L. Ricker), The Ricker compilation of vital records of early Connecticut : based on the Barbour Collection of Connecticut town vital records and other statistical sources, CD-ROM (Salt Lake City, Utah: Genealogical Publishing Co., c2006), Available now directly from computers located in the FHL, page 4467, citing Hartford Vital Records. Hereinafter cited as Ricker compilation of Connecticut vital records.