Samuel Sherman1

b. say 1593
Father*Edmund Sherman1 b. s 1548
Mother*Ann Clere1 b. s 1566, d. b 12 Jan 1610/11
Birth*say 1593Samuel Sherman was born say 1593 in Dedham, Essex County, England.1

Citations

  1. [S1327] Michael Johnson Wood, "The Earliest Shermans of Dedham, Essex, and their Wives", New England Historical & Genealogical Register. Note: This article, in 6 Parts, spans six issues of the Register. It is thoroughly researched and fully sourced, and includes a wealth of knowledge on the Shermans and their extended families. Only a very small amount of the information available in Mr. Wood's article is included in this researcher's website project. Volumes 166 - 168 (October 2012 - January 2014): Part 6: The Family of Edmund Sherman, Volume 168, pages 16-33. Hereinafter cited as "The Earliest Shermans of Dedham, Essex."

Sarah Sherman1

b. 4 July 1587
Father*Edmund Sherman1 b. s 1548
Mother*Ann Clere1 b. s 1566, d. b 12 Jan 1610/11
Baptism*4 July 1587Sarah Sherman was baptized on 4 July 1587 in Dedham, Essex County, England.1

Citations

  1. [S1327] Michael Johnson Wood, "The Earliest Shermans of Dedham, Essex, and their Wives", New England Historical & Genealogical Register. Note: This article, in 6 Parts, spans six issues of the Register. It is thoroughly researched and fully sourced, and includes a wealth of knowledge on the Shermans and their extended families. Only a very small amount of the information available in Mr. Wood's article is included in this researcher's website project. Volumes 166 - 168 (October 2012 - January 2014): Part 6: The Family of Edmund Sherman, Volume 168, pages 16-33. Hereinafter cited as "The Earliest Shermans of Dedham, Essex."

Susan Sherman1

b. 17 February 1590/91
Father*Edmund Sherman1 b. s 1548
Mother*Ann Clere1 b. s 1566, d. b 12 Jan 1610/11
Baptism*17 February 1590/91Susan Sherman was baptized on 17 February 1590/91 in Dedham, Essex County, England.1

Citations

  1. [S1327] Michael Johnson Wood, "The Earliest Shermans of Dedham, Essex, and their Wives", New England Historical & Genealogical Register. Note: This article, in 6 Parts, spans six issues of the Register. It is thoroughly researched and fully sourced, and includes a wealth of knowledge on the Shermans and their extended families. Only a very small amount of the information available in Mr. Wood's article is included in this researcher's website project. Volumes 166 - 168 (October 2012 - January 2014): Part 6: The Family of Edmund Sherman, Volume 168, pages 16-33. Hereinafter cited as "The Earliest Shermans of Dedham, Essex."

Robert Forster Shields

(Heir) Will21 September 1766John Hinds of Kilmainham, County Cavan, Ireland, left a will dated 21 September 1766 and proven on 7 Feb 1769 naming the following beneficiaries: Mary (Hinds) Stephens, Mary (Hinds) Clarke, Ralph Clarke, Mary Anne Clarke, Catherine (Clarke) Stephens, Anthony Clarke, Walter Hinds, John Hinds, Thomas Hinds, William Hinds, Margaret Hinds, Richard Booth, George Hinds, Thomas Hinds, Ralph Hinds, John Hinds, Margaret Latterton, William Latterton, Mary Latterton, George Grahams, Robert Forster Shields and Jane Trimble. Robert Forster Shields received the sum of five pounds sterling.1

Citations

  1. [S342] John Hinds will (21 Sep 1766), Copy of the Last Will and Testament of John Hinds, late of Kilmainham (County Meath), proven 7 Feb 1769, National Archives of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. Hereinafter cited as Will of John Hinds, proven 1769.

John H. Shively1

b. 1849
Father*Michael Shively1 b. 1828
Mother*Sarah Thornburgh1 b. 24 Jun 1830
Birth*1849John H. Shively was born about 1849 in Indiana.1
(Son) Census 185013 August 1850John appeared on the 1850 census taken on 13 August 1850 in the household of his parents in Dalton, Wayne County, Indiana. He was one year old.1

Citations

  1. [S17] 1850 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Michael Shively, Dalton, Wayne, Indiana; Roll: M432_180; Page: 87B; Image: 182. Hereinafter cited as 1850 US Federal Census.

Michael Shively1,2

b. 1828
Birth*1828Michael Shively was born about 1828 in Germany.2
Marriage*He married Sarah Thornburgh, daughter of Henry Thornburgh and Sarah Reynolds.2,1
Census 1850*13 August 1850Sarah and Michael Shively appeared on the 1850 census taken on 13 August 1850 in Dalton, Wayne County, Indiana. They lived in the next census household to Sarah's parents with their one-year-old son, John. Michael was 22 years of age and worked as a laborer and Sarah was 21.2

Family

Sarah Thornburgh b. 24 Jun 1830
Child1.John H. Shively2 b. 1849

Citations

  1. [S1509] Cora M. (Patty) Payne, Genealogy of the Maulsby Family for Five Generations, 1699-1902, downloaded from Internet Archive at www.archive.org. (Des Moines, Iowa: Geo. A. Miller Press, 1902), page 96. Hereinafter cited as Genealogy of the Maulsby Family.
  2. [S17] 1850 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Michael Shively, Dalton, Wayne, Indiana; Roll: M432_180; Page: 87B; Image: 182. Hereinafter cited as 1850 US Federal Census.

Clarence Vinton Shove

b. 25 August 1837, d. 10 January 1918
RelationshipsGrandson of John Bolton
4th great-grandson of Nicholas Boulton
ChartsDescendants of Nicholas Boulton, The Immigrant
Descendants of John Bolton and Zilpah Peirce
Father*Samuel Shove1 b. 2 Feb 1789, d. 11 Dec 1874
Mother*Elizabeth Everett Bolton b. 30 May 1806, d. 21 Jan 1864
Birth*25 August 1837Clarence Vinton Shove was born on 25 August 1837 in Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.
(Son) Residence1847About the year of 1847, Clarence Vinton Shove moved with his parents to Pope Creek, Knox County, Illinois, where his father Samuel continued to work a small piece of land and kept a stock of goods, enjoying the variety to be found in running a country store. Their two youngest children were with them in Pope Creek, and Elizabeth's daughter, Elizabeth Brown, age 21, had married Lucien Conger in 1845 and lived in Galesburg. Samuel's daughter, Nancy, had died in 1844 and his daughter, Hannah, had possibly already married Gershom Redway before her family moved from Providence. The whereabouts of the four older boys, all old enough to be on their own, William Shove at age 33, Josiah Shove at 23, James Brown, also 23 and George Brown at 19, remains a mystery to this researcher. William and Josiah Shove were still living in 1874, but James and George Brown have not yet been found.2
(Son) Residence1849Around 1849, Clarence Vinton Shove moved with his parents, Samuel Shove and Elizabeth E. Shove from Mount Hope to Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois.1
(Son) Census 185024 September 1850Clarence Vinton Shove appeared on the 1850 census taken on 24 September 1850 in the household of his parents Samuel Shove and Elizabeth E. Shove in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois. Samuel's occupation was recorded as Merchant. The household was made up of Samuel, age 63, Elizabeth, 43, son Clarence Vinton, 13, and daughter, Louisa, age 9.3
(Brother) Census 18607 June 1860Clarence Shove appeared on the 1860 census taken on 7 June 1860 in the household of his half-brother, George W. Brown and his wife Eleanor (Kenyon) Brown, in Mount Hope, McLean County, Illinois. Clarence was helping George with the farm's labor. George and Eleanor had four young sons also living with them in the household. Cassius was 7, Harold 5, Frank 4, and Lucien 2. The next family enumerated on the census was the household of James Brown, Clarence's and George's older brother, and members of Eleanor's kenyon family also lived nearby.4
Marriage*9 August 1865He married Sarah Amelia Spicer, daughter of Reuben Hull Spicer and Sophia Whitehead, on 9 August 1865.
Census 1870*14 July 1870Clarence V. and Sarah A. Shove appeared on the 1870 census taken on 14 July 1870 in Greene, Mercer County, Illinois. Their son, George, was 4 years old.5
Occupation*Clarence was a farmer.5
Residence*1874Clarence Vinton Shove lived in 1874 at Viola, Mercer County, Illinois.2
Census 1880*4 June 1880Clarence V. and Sarah A. Shove appeared on the 1880 census taken on 4 June 1880 in Viola, Mercer County, Illinois. Their two sons, George 13, and Marius 7, resided with their parents.6
OccupationClarence was a merchant of grocery and dry goods.6
Death*10 January 1918 Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross reported that her grandmother, Louisa Agnes (Shove) Conger told her that her brother Clarence had died on January 10, 1918.1

Family

Sarah Amelia Spicer b. 14 May 1838, d. 1906
Children1.George Spicer Shove b. 1866, d. 1890
2.Marius Bolton Shove b. 1872, d. 1953

Citations

  1. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).
  2. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  3. [S17] 1850 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Samuel Shove, Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois, roll M432_113, page 354, image 54. Hereinafter cited as 1850 US Federal Census.
  4. [S18] 1860 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of G.W. Brown, Mount Hope, McLean County, Illinois; Roll: M653_204; Page: 14; Image: 15. Hereinafter cited as 1860 US Federal Census.
  5. [S37] 1870 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Clarence "B" and Sarah A Shove, Greene, Mercer County, Illinois; Roll: 593_260; Page: 197; Image: 395. Hereinafter cited as 1870 US Federal Census.
  6. [S23] 1880 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Clarence... and Sarah Shove, Viola, Mercer County, Illinois; Roll: T9_236; Family History Film: 1254236; Page: 287.2000; Enumeration District: 175; Image: 0360. Hereinafter cited as 1880 US Federal Census.

Elizabeth Shove1

Marriage*She married John Mills Jr.1

Family

John Mills Jr.
Child1.Susanna Mills1 b. 1675, d. 1754

Citations

  1. [S869] Marcus Taft Jones, Hayward-Howard genealogy and family history: descendants of William and Margery Hayward of Braintree, Massachusetts, 1648; earlier of Weymouth. Microfilm of typescript at the Rhode Island Historical Society in Providence, Rhode Island. Hayward genealogy 1648-1690: pages 1-13; FHL Film# 22344, Item 2, LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as Hayward-Howard genealogy and family history.

George Shove1

b. 1634, d. 21 April 1687
Birth*1634George Shove was born in 1634 in England.2,1
Marriage*12 July 1664George Shove married first Hopestill Newman of Rehoboth on 12 July 1664 in Taunton, Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts (Plymouth Colony).3,4
(Husband) Death7 March 1673/74George became a widower when Hopestill Shove died on 7 March 1673/74.5
Death*21 April 1687He died on 21 April 1687 in Taunton, Bristol County, Massachusetts (Plymouth Colony), just four months after his third marriage.5

Family

Hopestill Newman d. 7 Mar 1673/74
Child1.Nathaniel Shove+1,6 b. 29 Jan 1668, d. b 1778

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  2. [S291] Benjamin Jay Shove, The Family Shove, origin England and early New England, Tables of Descent : a genealogical narrative dedicated to all descendants of the Reverend George Shove, third pastor of Taunton, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Ferris Printing Company, 1941), chapter "Rev. Edward Shove, Jr., Gent. - 1606-1638", pages 24-29. Hereinafter cited as The Family Shove.
  3. [S48] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850. CD-ROM (101 Newbury, Boston, Massachusetts: NEHGS), Births - Marriages - Deaths, Taunton, Volume 2, page 348, her surname spelled "Newman". Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850.
  4. [S1193] Edgar H. Reed, "Marriages, Births and Deaths at Taunton Mass.", compiled from the Taunton Proprietors' Records, New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 16, pages 324-328 and Volume 17, pages 34-37 and pages 232-236 (October 1862 and January 1863): Volume 17, page 236, his name spelled "Goarg" and her surname spelled "Numan". Hereinafter cited as "Taunton Marriages, Births and Deaths."
  5. [S292] From the Proprietors' Records. Communicated by Edgar H. Reed of Taunton, "Marriages, Births and Deaths at Taunton, Mass.", New England Historical and Genealogical Register volume 16, page 326 (Oct 1862): page 326. Hereinafter cited as "Shove Marriages, Births and Deaths at Taunton."
  6. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Taunton Births, Volume 1, page 387. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.

George Spicer Shove

b. 1866, d. 1890
RelationshipsGreat-grandson of John Bolton
5th great-grandson of Nicholas Boulton
ChartsDescendants of Nicholas Boulton, The Immigrant
Descendants of John Bolton and Zilpah Peirce
Father*Clarence Vinton Shove b. 25 Aug 1837, d. 10 Jan 1918
Mother*Sarah Amelia Spicer b. 14 May 1838, d. 1906
Birth*1866George Spicer Shove was born in 1866 in Illinois.1
(Son) Census 187014 July 1870George S. Shove appeared on the 1870 census taken on 14 July 1870 in the household of his parents, Clarence and Sarah A. Shove, in Greene, Mercer County, Illinois. George was 4 years old.1
(Son) Census 18804 June 1880George Spicer Shove, who was 13, and his brother Marius, 7, appeared on the 1880 census taken on 4 June 1880 in the household of their parents, Clarence V. and Sarah A. Shove in Viola, Mercer County, Illinois.2
Death*1890He died in 1890.

Citations

  1. [S37] 1870 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Clarence "B" and Sarah A Shove, Greene, Mercer County, Illinois; Roll: 593_260; Page: 197; Image: 395. Hereinafter cited as 1870 US Federal Census.
  2. [S23] 1880 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Clarence... and Sarah Shove, Viola, Mercer County, Illinois; Roll: T9_236; Family History Film: 1254236; Page: 287.2000; Enumeration District: 175; Image: 0360. Hereinafter cited as 1880 US Federal Census.

Hannah Shove1

b. 8 April 1751
Father*Nathaniel Shove1 b. 29 Jan 1668, d. b 1778
Mother*Hannah Baxter1
Birth*8 April 1751Hannah Shove was born on 8 April 1751.2
Marriage*9 September 1779She married Micajah Chase on 9 September 1779.2

Family

Micajah Chase

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  2. [S290] Contributed by John Carroll Chase of Derry NH as compiled for him by George Walter Chamberlain M.S. of Malden MA, "Some of the Descendants of William Chase of Roxbury and Yarmouth, Massachusetts", New England Historical and Genealogical Register Volume 88, pages 7-32 (January 1934): page 17. Hereinafter cited as "William Chase of Roxbury and Yarmouth, Mass."

Hannah Baxter Shove

b. 1818
Father*Samuel Shove1 b. 2 Feb 1789, d. 11 Dec 1874
Mother*Lydia Buffum1 b. 17 Oct 1787, d. 8 Sep 1833
Birth*1818Hannah Baxter Shove was born in 1818 in Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island.2
Birth1819Hannah Baxter Shove was born in 1819.
(Daughter) Residencebetween 1820 and 1825About the year 1820, Samuel Shove and Lydia (Buffum) Shove purchased what, in 1874, had become known as the "Ephraim Coe farm" in Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island. Hannah Baxter Shove lived there with her parents until 1825 when they moved to Providence.2
(Daughter) Residencebetween 1825 and 1840Hannah Baxter Shove moved with her parents in between 1825 and 1840 to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, where the family lived for the next sixteen years. Where Lydia died in 1835 and the rest of the family continued to live for the next six years. Most of their sixteen years in Providence, they lived in a double brick house on Benefit Street between College and Waterman streets, and Samuel was a charming host to all who visited, extending his hospitalities largely to visiting members of the Society of Friends and his many business associates. All who came under his roof were welcomed heartily and entertained liberally.

In Providence, Samuel was very active within the community. He was one of the first directors of the Globe Bank, organized in 1831, with William Sprague as President, and John R. Bartlett as cashier, and also for some years was a director in the American Insurance Company.

In politics, Samuel was an active and devoted member of the Whig Party, which was formed in 1832 to oppose the policies of President Andrew Jackson and the Democratic Party. In particular, the Whigs supported the supremacy of Congress over the Executive Branch and favored a program of modernization and economic development.

The Party's name was chosen to echo the American Whigs of the 1770s who fought for independence, and the Whig Party included among its members such national political personalities as Daniel Webster, William Henry Harrison, and their greatest leader, Henry Clay of Kentucky. In addition to Harrison, the Whig Party also counted four war heroes among its ranks, including Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. Its Illinois leader was Abraham Lincoln.

In its 26-year existence, the Whig Party saw two of its candidates elected President of the United States -- Harrison and Taylor -- and saw both of them die in office. Four months after succeeding Harrison, Whig President John Tyler was expelled from the Party, and Millard Fillmore, Taylor's Vice President, was the last Whig to hold the nation's highest office.

The party was ultimately destroyed by the question of whether to allow the expansion of slavery to the territories. Deep fissures in the membership on this question led the party to run Winfield Scott over its own incumbent President Fillmore in the presidential election of 1852. The Whig Party never elected another President. Its leaders quit politics (as Lincoln did temporarily) or changed parties. By 1856 the Party had ceased operations and the voter base defected in a variety of different directions. Samuel, in Illinois, followed Lincoln, and gave his hearty allegiance to the Republican Party at its first formation. He retained an intelligent interest in, and supported its activities, up to the last moment of his life. He believed strongly in the value of homeland business and "made in the USA" merchandise, and throughout his entire career lost no opportunity to defend that principle whenever and wherever he found the opportunity.

He had a clear head and sound judgment and never failed to give good counsel to all who sought it of him. His son, Josiah, wrote that Samuel Shove "led a very active life mentally and physically, and his ruling aim seemed to be to do whatsoever came to his hand with all his might, deeming all honest work honorable, and only scorning to eat the bread of idleness or of dishonesty."2,3
(Daughter) Census 18301 June 1830Hannah Baxter Shove likely appeared on the 1830 census taken on 1 June 1830 in the household of her father Samuel Shove in East Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. There were seven members of the household, including one male aged 5-10 (Josiah), one male aged 15-20 (William), one male aged 40-50 (Samuel), one female aged 5-10 (Nancy), one female aged 10-15 (Hannah), one female aged 20-30 (likely a servant) and one female aged 40-50 (Lydia.)4
Marriage*She married Gershom M. Redway.2
Residence*1874Hannah Baxter Shove lived in 1874 at New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.2

Citations

  1. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).
  2. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  3. [S253] The Whig Party (United States), online at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States), downloaded 22 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as Whig Party (United States).
  4. [S16] 1830 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Samuel Shove, Providence East Side of River, Providence County, Rhode Island, roll 168, page 19. Hereinafter cited as 1830 US Federal Census.

Josiah Shove

b. 8 October 1824
Father*Samuel Shove1 b. 2 Feb 1789, d. 11 Dec 1874
Mother*Lydia Buffum1 b. 17 Oct 1787, d. 8 Sep 1833
Birth*8 October 1824Josiah Shove was born on 8 October 1824.2
(Son) Residencebetween 1825 and 1840Josiah Shove moved with his parents in between 1825 and 1840 to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, where the family lived for the next sixteen years. Where Lydia died in 1835 and the rest of the family continued to live for the next six years. Most of their sixteen years in Providence, they lived in a double brick house on Benefit Street between College and Waterman streets, and Samuel was a charming host to all who visited, extending his hospitalities largely to visiting members of the Society of Friends and his many business associates. All who came under his roof were welcomed heartily and entertained liberally.

In Providence, Samuel was very active within the community. He was one of the first directors of the Globe Bank, organized in 1831, with William Sprague as President, and John R. Bartlett as cashier, and also for some years was a director in the American Insurance Company.

In politics, Samuel was an active and devoted member of the Whig Party, which was formed in 1832 to oppose the policies of President Andrew Jackson and the Democratic Party. In particular, the Whigs supported the supremacy of Congress over the Executive Branch and favored a program of modernization and economic development.

The Party's name was chosen to echo the American Whigs of the 1770s who fought for independence, and the Whig Party included among its members such national political personalities as Daniel Webster, William Henry Harrison, and their greatest leader, Henry Clay of Kentucky. In addition to Harrison, the Whig Party also counted four war heroes among its ranks, including Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. Its Illinois leader was Abraham Lincoln.

In its 26-year existence, the Whig Party saw two of its candidates elected President of the United States -- Harrison and Taylor -- and saw both of them die in office. Four months after succeeding Harrison, Whig President John Tyler was expelled from the Party, and Millard Fillmore, Taylor's Vice President, was the last Whig to hold the nation's highest office.

The party was ultimately destroyed by the question of whether to allow the expansion of slavery to the territories. Deep fissures in the membership on this question led the party to run Winfield Scott over its own incumbent President Fillmore in the presidential election of 1852. The Whig Party never elected another President. Its leaders quit politics (as Lincoln did temporarily) or changed parties. By 1856 the Party had ceased operations and the voter base defected in a variety of different directions. Samuel, in Illinois, followed Lincoln, and gave his hearty allegiance to the Republican Party at its first formation. He retained an intelligent interest in, and supported its activities, up to the last moment of his life. He believed strongly in the value of homeland business and "made in the USA" merchandise, and throughout his entire career lost no opportunity to defend that principle whenever and wherever he found the opportunity.

He had a clear head and sound judgment and never failed to give good counsel to all who sought it of him. His son, Josiah, wrote that Samuel Shove "led a very active life mentally and physically, and his ruling aim seemed to be to do whatsoever came to his hand with all his might, deeming all honest work honorable, and only scorning to eat the bread of idleness or of dishonesty."2,3
(Son) Census 18301 June 1830Josiah Shove likely appeared on the 1 June 1830 census in the household of his father Samuel Shove in East Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. There were seven members of the household, including one male aged 5-10 (Josiah), one male aged 15-20 (William), one male aged 40-50 (Samuel), one female aged 5-10 (Nancy), one female aged 10-15 (Hannah), one female aged 20-30 (likely a servant) and one female aged 40-50 (Lydia.)4
Residence*1874Josiah Shove lived in 1874 at New York City, New York County, New York.2

Citations

  1. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).
  2. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  3. [S253] The Whig Party (United States), online at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States), downloaded 22 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as Whig Party (United States).
  4. [S16] 1830 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Samuel Shove, Providence East Side of River, Providence County, Rhode Island, roll 168, page 19. Hereinafter cited as 1830 US Federal Census.

Josiah Shove1

b. 18 April 1756
Father*Nathaniel Shove1 b. 29 Jan 1668, d. b 1778
Mother*Hannah Baxter1
Birth*18 April 1756Josiah Shove was born on 18 April 1756, and reported in the records of Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England), with the notation that the information was obtained from his gravestone, so he may not have actually been born in Uxbridge.2
Occupation*1778His occupation was recorded as a blacksmith of Mendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts (Continental Congress), in 1778.2
Marriage*23 September 1778He married first Joanna Dow, daughter of Samuel Dow and Marcy ______, on 23 September 1778 in Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts (Continental Congress), their intention of marriage recorded on 20 Aug 1778 in Amesbury, also in Essex County. She was the mother of all nine of his children.1,2
MarriageHe married second Avis Sisson.1
MarriageJosiah Shove married third Sarah Wilbur.1,3

Family

Joanna Dow b. 14 Nov 1755, d. 10 May 1796
Child1.Samuel Shove+4,3 b. 2 Feb 1789, d. 11 Dec 1874

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  2. [S48] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850. CD-ROM (101 Newbury, Boston, Massachusetts: NEHGS), Births - Marriages - Deaths. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850.
  3. [S44] Roy Henry Heaton, (Miles City, Montana). "Heaton Family Pedigree Chart - Eleven Generations", prepared by hand in 1941. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, some of the information and the dates, particularly, in this pedigree chart often prove to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented was a good place for us to start, and has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. Hereinafter cited as "Heaton Family Pedigree Chart - 1941."
  4. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).

Louisa Agnes Shove1,2

b. 24 June 1841, d. circa 1943
Louisa Agnes (Shove) Conger
RelationshipsGranddaughter of John Bolton
4th great-granddaughter of Nicholas Boulton
ChartsDescendants of Nicholas Boulton, The Immigrant
Descendants of John Bolton and Zilpah Peirce
Father*Samuel Shove2,3 b. 2 Feb 1789, d. 11 Dec 1874
Mother*Elizabeth Everett Bolton2,1 b. 30 May 1806, d. 21 Jan 1864
Birth*24 June 1841Louisa Agnes Shove was born on 24 June 1841 near Bloomington, McLean County, Illinois.4,3
(Daughter) Residence1847About the year of 1847, Louisa Agnes Shove moved with her parents to Pope Creek, Knox County, Illinois, where her father Samuel continued to work a small piece of land and kept a stock of goods, enjoying the variety to be found in running a country store. Their two youngest children were with them in Pope Creek, and Elizabeth's daughter, Elizabeth Brown, age 21, had married Lucien Conger in 1845 and lived in Galesburg. Samuel's daughter, Nancy, had died in 1844 and his daughter, Hannah, had possibly already married Gershom Redway before her family moved from Providence. The whereabouts of the four older boys, all old enough to be on their own, William Shove at age 33, Josiah Shove at 23, James Brown, also 23 and George Brown at 19, remains a mystery to this researcher. William and Josiah Shove were still living in 1874, but James and George Brown have not yet been found.5
(Daughter) Residence1849Around 1849, Louisa Agnes Shove moved with her parents, Samuel Shove and Elizabeth E. Shove from Mount Hope to Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois.2
(Daughter) Underground Railroadcirca 1850One night the Shove's young daughter, Louisa, was awakened in the night in her upstairs bedroom in their Galesburg, Illinois house. She told her grandchildren, years later, of going sleepily downstairs as nine year olds will, and opening the door on a room filled with people -- her parents, some neighbors and some black strangers. She was hushed back to bed. And for a long time she did not know whether it was dream or memory. When she was older she realized that her parents' home had been a station on the Underground Railway.

In the 1850s the Underground Railroad existed in every State from Maine to Iowa, but mainly in Ohio and Illinois. It functioned without formal organization, officers, rules or maps. It was altogether spontaneous. The slaves fled across the border, appealed for help, found it, sent back word; others found the way, and soon scores of men were helping them, how many no one knows. Galesburg was the most important station in Illinois. The galleries of its Old First Church afforded hiding places for slaves. There were houses in the village and farms on the prairie whose occupants, like the Shoves, were ready to receive fugitives at any hour of the night. Each group worked in ignorance of the size of the movement or its ramifications. All they knew were the stations nearest and the men who went to and fro. There were no records, no statistics. The less they knew the better when it came to testifying in court. Passwords were arranged between those dealing with each other. The routes were frequently changed. It was the simplest organization imaginable and in its simplicity lay its success.6,7
(Daughter) Census 185024 September 1850Louisa Agnes Shove appeared on the 1850 census taken on 24 September 1850 in the household of her parents Samuel Shove and Elizabeth E. Shove in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois. Samuel's occupation was recorded as Merchant. The household was made up of Samuel, age 63, Elizabeth, 43, son Clarence Vinton, 13, and daughter, Louisa, age 9.8
(Daughter) Residence13 December 1853In 1853 the family moved to Mercer County and Louisa's father, by Warrant, purchased federal land on 13 December 1853 in Mercer County, Illinois. The land, consisting of 40 acres, was located in Section Number 32, Township 14N, Range 2W of the 4th Principal Meridian of the County of Mercer, and had the legal description SESE.2,9
(Daughter) Residencebetween 1854 and 1864Samuel Shove and Elizabeth E. Shove made several moves between 1854 and 1864 and their actual pattern of relocation has not yet been determined accurately. Their daughter, Louisa Agnes Shove moved with her parents Samuel, on a journey he made to New England in 1853, contracted an infection of his eyes which resulted within a year or two in a total loss of sight in one eye, and such impaired vision of the remaining one, he became no longer able to continue the work of his business. He was a much disciplined man however, with a very strong work ethic, and continued to make himself as useful as he possibly could. In 1857, following the loss of his sight, he and Elizabeth removed to Oneida, Knox County, Illinois.5
Marriage*2 May 1866She married, as his second wife, Crayton Hall Conger, son of Uzziah Conger and Hannah West, on 2 May 1866 in Henry County, Illinois.2,1,10,11
Census 1870*9 July 1870Louisa and Crayton Hall Conger appeared on the 1870 census taken on 9 July 1870 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. Crayton was 44 and worked as a Lumber Dealer. His real estate was valued at $15,000 and his personal estate at $20,000. Louisa was 29 and was keeping house. Crayton's three children from his first marriage, Arthur at 19, Irene at 16 and Lillie, at 14, lived with the couple whose first child, Alice, had just been born the day before and was not enumerated. Irene and Lillie were both at school and Arthur, who had attended school within the last year, was working as a bookkeeper. Emily Anderson, age 19 and born in Sweden, also lived with the family as a domestic servant.

The Lucien Conger family also lived in Chicago Ward 5 in 1870, probably fairly near, since both families were enumerated by the same person only two days apart. In the other Conger household, Lucien was Crayton's brother and Samuel Shove and Elizabeth (Brown) Conger were Louisa's father and half-sister.12
Great Chicago Fire8 October 1871 No one knows how the fire started in the cow barn at the rear of the Patrick O'Leary cottage at 137 DeKoven Street on Chicago's West Side. The blaze began about 9 p.m. that Sunday night, and by midnight the fire had jumped the river's south branch and by 1:30 a.m., the business district was in flames. Shortly thereafter the fire raced northward across the main river.

The waterworks were evacuated although the tower was not badly damaged and still stands. During Monday, the fire burned as far as Fullerton Avenue and rainfall, which started about midnight, helped put out the last of the flames. 300 Chicagoans were dead, 90,000 homeless, and the property loss was $200 million.

Chicago quickly rebuilt and by 1875 little evidence of the disaster remained.13
Residence*Around the time of the Great Chicago Fire, which occurred 8 Oct 1871, Louisa and Crayton Hall Conger moved with their baby daughter to a farm near Oneida, Knox County, Illinois. Their daughter Alice's two letters contradict each other regarding the timing of the family's move. Her "c1935" source said the move was just prior to the fire and her "c1950" notes stated it was shortly after.13,14,15,5
Relocation*12 April 1878 Within a few years of moving his family to the farm in Oneida, Crayton's health began to fail. Thinking that a change in climate might help, he and Louisa moved their family to New Mexico in 1877. Their daughter, Alice, was 7 years old and wrote that she had only a dim recollection of the long journey. Son Roy was 4, Elizabeth 2, and Hazel was an infant. Crayton's older son, Arthur, and his family made the trip also. Arthur was 26, his wife Ella was 21, and their young daughter Lucy was 3.

At that time, Trinidad, Colorado was the end of the railroad line and the family made the remainder of the trip to New Mexico on the Santa Fe Trail by stagecoach. It was a tiring and dusty trip, and would have been especially so for the young children. Crayton and his son, Arthur, invested together in the purchase of what was commonly known then as a "Post Traders" store at Fort Union, Mora County, New Mexico. Crayton was appointed as the post trader and they bought the Sutler's store on 12 April 1878.16,14,15
(Wife) Death22 May 1880Louisa became a widow when Crayton Hall Conger died on 22 May 1880.14,17
Census 1900*15 June 1900Louisa was enumerated on the 1900 census taken on 15 June 1900 at 565 6th Street, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. She was 58 years of age, a widow, and lived with three of her daughters, Elizabeth, Hazel and Emma in a house she rented. Elizabeth was 25 years of age and worked as a stenographer, Hazel was 22 and worked as a bill clerk, and Emma was 20 years of age.18
(Participant) Family Photo19 January 1903 On 19 Jan 1903 several photos of the extended Heaton family were taken at a family gathering, probably at William and Lucy Heaton's home in Des Moines, Iowa. Multiple shots of primarily the same individuals in different groupings are spread across the country among the Heaton descendants.19
(Mother-in-Law) Census 191015 April 1910Louisa (Shove) Conger appeared on the 1910 census taken on 15 April 1910 in the household of her daughter and son-in-law, Hazel and Roy Henry Heaton, in Dalhart, Dallam County, Texas. She was 68 years of age and worked as a librarian in a library.20
Biographical Info* Louisa enjoyed celebrating her birthday. The Des Moines, Iowa Tribune wrote quite a long article about her when she turned 100 -- with the headline "Mrs. Louisa Conger 100 YEARS OLD". The story said she was "a child of the depression" of 1841 and that she was born two years before the first telegraph line linked Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland. "Mrs. Conger is enjoying the fruit of progress" and was planning to have her first airplane ride to celebrate her birthday.

In describing Louisa, the article said "her sight is failing some; she requires earphones for conversation; she uses a cane and a crutch to walk -- but her mind and memory are clear, and she hasn't lost her sense of humor."21
Death*circa 1943 Her granddaughter, Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, estimated the year of her grandmother's death as between 1942 and 1944.22

Family

Crayton Hall Conger b. 24 Apr 1825, d. 22 May 1880
Children1.Alice Shove Conger+1 b. 8 Jul 1870, d. bt 1958 - 1959
2.Roy Uzziah Conger1 b. 6 Feb 1873, d. c 1934
3.Elizabeth May Conger+1 b. 12 Apr 1875, d. 20 Aug 1922
4.Hazel Conger+1 b. 19 Sep 1877, d. 13 Jun 1929
5.Emma B. Conger+1 b. 29 Jan 1880, d. 14 Dec 1911

Citations

  1. [S9] Compiled by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, transcribed from the original Conger Volumes published by Helen Maxine Cromwell in 1973, "Notes Taken From: The Conger Family of America", compiled on 10 Aug 1982 (Issaquah, Washington 98029). Hereinafter cited as "Conger Family Outline."
  2. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).
  3. [S9] Compiled by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, transcribed from the original Conger Volumes published by Helen Maxine Cromwell in 1973, "Conger Family Outline", noting her place of birth incorrectly as Albany, New York.
  4. [S19] Says Lincoln Not Homely - Mrs. Conger Recalls Douglas Debate - She's 95, Des Moines Tribune, Des Moines, Iowa, 1936. Hereinafter cited as Des Moines Tribune, Mrs. Louisa Conger is 95.
  5. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  6. [S240] Mary Lou Skinner Ross, Thoughts While Ironing. Warning: The publication contains no chapters or page numbers. (Atlanta, Georgia: Ross, Mary Lou Skinner, 1981). Hereinafter cited as Thoughts While Ironing.
  7. [S241] Earnest Elmo Calkins, They Broke the Prairie (New York, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1937), pages 226 - 228. Hereinafter cited as They Broke the Prairie.
  8. [S17] 1850 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Samuel Shove, Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois, roll M432_113, page 354, image 54. Hereinafter cited as 1850 US Federal Census.
  9. [S249] Illinois Public Domain Land Tract Database of the Illinois State Archives, online at http://www.library.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/…. Hereinafter cited as Illinois Public Domain Land Records.
  10. [S44] Roy Henry Heaton, (Miles City, Montana). "Heaton Family Pedigree Chart - Eleven Generations", prepared by hand in 1941. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, some of the information and the dates, particularly, in this pedigree chart often prove to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented was a good place for us to start, and has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. Hereinafter cited as "Heaton Family Pedigree Chart - 1941."
  11. [S512] Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900, online at www.ilsos.gov/Genealogy/. Hereinafter cited as Illinois Marriage Index, 1763-1900.
  12. [S37] 1870 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Crayton H. Conger, Chicago Ward 5, Cook County, Illinois, roll M593_200, page 204, image 409. Hereinafter cited as 1870 US Federal Census.
  13. [S256] The Great Chicago Fire of 1871, online at http://www.chipublib.org/004chicago/timeline/greatfire.html. Hereinafter cited as Great Chicago Fire of 1871.
  14. [S21] Alice Shove (Conger) Hunter, "(Autobiographical Notes of) Alice Shove Conger-Hunter, c1935", first of two writings obtained, (untitled with the exception of her name, undated and probably written around 1935). Hereinafter cited as "Autobiographical Notes of Alice Shove Conger-Hunter, c1935."
  15. [S22] Alice Shove (Conger) Hunter, "(Autobiographical Notes of) Alice Shove Conger-Hunter, c1950", second of two writings obtained, (undated and probably written around 1950). Hereinafter cited as "Autobiographical Notes of Alice Shove Conger-Hunter, c1950."
  16. [S258] James Ivey, "'The Best Sutler's Store in America': James E. Barrow and the Formation of Trader's Row at Fort Union, New Mexico, 1867-1891", New Mexico Historical Review volume 70, number 3, pages 299-327 (July 1995): pages 229-327. Hereinafter cited as "Trader's Row (and the Congers) at Fort Union."
  17. [S133] Maxine Crowell Leonard, The Conger Family of America, Volumes I and II (Janesville, Iowa 50647: Larry and Maxine Leonard, 1972), Volume I, page 494. Hereinafter cited as Conger Family of America.
  18. [S34] 1900 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Louisa A. Conger, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa; roll: T623_453; Page 18A; Enumeration District: 71. Hereinafter cited as 1900 US Federal Census.
  19. [S1457] "Heaton Family Photograph Collection." (Old family photographs in the possession of LHB, Santa Barbara, California, ). Hereinafter cited as "Heaton Family Photograph Collection."
  20. [S40] 1910 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of R. H. Heaton, 4-Wd Delhart, Dallam County, Texas; series: T624; roll: 1541; page 97; Enumeration District: 70. Hereinafter cited as 1910 US Federal Census.
  21. [S213] Mrs. Louisa Conger 100 Years Old Plans Plane Ride, Des Moines Tribune, Des Moines, Iowa, 1941. Hereinafter cited as Des Moines Tribune, Louisa Conger 100 Years Old.
  22. [S1] Personal Knowledge of LHB, (Santa Barbara, California).

Lydia Shove1

Father*Nathaniel Shove1 b. 29 Jan 1668, d. b 1778
Mother*Hannah Baxter1

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.

Marius Bolton Shove

b. 1872, d. 1953
RelationshipsGreat-grandson of John Bolton
5th great-grandson of Nicholas Boulton
ChartsDescendants of Nicholas Boulton, The Immigrant
Descendants of John Bolton and Zilpah Peirce
Father*Clarence Vinton Shove b. 25 Aug 1837, d. 10 Jan 1918
Mother*Sarah Amelia Spicer b. 14 May 1838, d. 1906
Marriage*He married Minnie E. Conquest.
Birth*1872Marius Bolton Shove was born in 1872.
(Son) Census 18804 June 1880Marius Bolton Shove, who was 7, and his brother George, 13, appeared on the 1880 census taken on 4 June 1880 in the household of their parents, Clarence V. and Sarah A. Shove in Viola, Mercer County, Illinois.1
Death*1953He died in 1953.

Family

Minnie E. Conquest b. 1880, d. 1968

Citations

  1. [S23] 1880 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Clarence... and Sarah Shove, Viola, Mercer County, Illinois; Roll: T9_236; Family History Film: 1254236; Page: 287.2000; Enumeration District: 175; Image: 0360. Hereinafter cited as 1880 US Federal Census.

Nancy Hacker Shove

b. 1821, d. June 1844
Father*Samuel Shove1 b. 2 Feb 1789, d. 11 Dec 1874
Mother*Lydia Buffum1 b. 17 Oct 1787, d. 8 Sep 1833
Birth*1821Nancy Hacker Shove was born in 1821.
(Daughter) Residencebetween 1825 and 1840Nancy Hacker Shove moved with her parents in between 1825 and 1840 to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, where the family lived for the next sixteen years. Where Lydia died in 1835 and the rest of the family continued to live for the next six years. Most of their sixteen years in Providence, they lived in a double brick house on Benefit Street between College and Waterman streets, and Samuel was a charming host to all who visited, extending his hospitalities largely to visiting members of the Society of Friends and his many business associates. All who came under his roof were welcomed heartily and entertained liberally.

In Providence, Samuel was very active within the community. He was one of the first directors of the Globe Bank, organized in 1831, with William Sprague as President, and John R. Bartlett as cashier, and also for some years was a director in the American Insurance Company.

In politics, Samuel was an active and devoted member of the Whig Party, which was formed in 1832 to oppose the policies of President Andrew Jackson and the Democratic Party. In particular, the Whigs supported the supremacy of Congress over the Executive Branch and favored a program of modernization and economic development.

The Party's name was chosen to echo the American Whigs of the 1770s who fought for independence, and the Whig Party included among its members such national political personalities as Daniel Webster, William Henry Harrison, and their greatest leader, Henry Clay of Kentucky. In addition to Harrison, the Whig Party also counted four war heroes among its ranks, including Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. Its Illinois leader was Abraham Lincoln.

In its 26-year existence, the Whig Party saw two of its candidates elected President of the United States -- Harrison and Taylor -- and saw both of them die in office. Four months after succeeding Harrison, Whig President John Tyler was expelled from the Party, and Millard Fillmore, Taylor's Vice President, was the last Whig to hold the nation's highest office.

The party was ultimately destroyed by the question of whether to allow the expansion of slavery to the territories. Deep fissures in the membership on this question led the party to run Winfield Scott over its own incumbent President Fillmore in the presidential election of 1852. The Whig Party never elected another President. Its leaders quit politics (as Lincoln did temporarily) or changed parties. By 1856 the Party had ceased operations and the voter base defected in a variety of different directions. Samuel, in Illinois, followed Lincoln, and gave his hearty allegiance to the Republican Party at its first formation. He retained an intelligent interest in, and supported its activities, up to the last moment of his life. He believed strongly in the value of homeland business and "made in the USA" merchandise, and throughout his entire career lost no opportunity to defend that principle whenever and wherever he found the opportunity.

He had a clear head and sound judgment and never failed to give good counsel to all who sought it of him. His son, Josiah, wrote that Samuel Shove "led a very active life mentally and physically, and his ruling aim seemed to be to do whatsoever came to his hand with all his might, deeming all honest work honorable, and only scorning to eat the bread of idleness or of dishonesty."2,3
(Daughter) Census 18301 June 1830Nancy Hacker Shove likely appeared on the 1830 census taken on 1 June 1830 in the household of her father Samuel Shove in East Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. There were seven members of the household, including one male aged 5-10 (Josiah), one male aged 15-20 (William), one male aged 40-50 (Samuel), one female aged 5-10 (Nancy), one female aged 10-15 (Hannah), one female aged 20-30 (likely a servant) and one female aged 40-50 (Lydia.)4
Death*June 1844She died in June 1844.2

Citations

  1. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).
  2. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  3. [S253] The Whig Party (United States), online at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States), downloaded 22 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as Whig Party (United States).
  4. [S16] 1830 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Samuel Shove, Providence East Side of River, Providence County, Rhode Island, roll 168, page 19. Hereinafter cited as 1830 US Federal Census.

Nathaniel Shove1

b. 29 January 1668, d. before 1778
Father*George Shove1,2 b. 1634, d. 21 Apr 1687
Mother*Hopestill Newman2 d. 7 Mar 1673/74
Birth*29 January 1668Nathaniel Shove was born on 29 January 1668 in Taunton, Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts (Plymouth Colony).3,1,2
Marriage*He married Hannah Baxter.1
Death*before 1778He died before 1778 in Dighton, Bristol County. The 1778 marriage record of his son, Josiah, is confusing to this researcher in that it noted that either Nathaniel or his wife, Hannah, or both of them were deceased.4

Family

Hannah Baxter
Children1.William Shove1
2.Lydia Shove1
3.Hannah Shove1 b. 8 Apr 1751
4.Nathaniel Shove1
5.Josiah Shove+1 b. 18 Apr 1756
6.Yet-Mercy Shove1
7.Squires Shove+1 b. 1 Mar 1761
8.Thomas Shove1

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  2. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Taunton Births, Volume 1, page 387. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  3. [S292] From the Proprietors' Records. Communicated by Edgar H. Reed of Taunton, "Marriages, Births and Deaths at Taunton, Mass.", New England Historical and Genealogical Register volume 16, page 326 (Oct 1862): page 326. Hereinafter cited as "Shove Marriages, Births and Deaths at Taunton."
  4. [S48] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850. CD-ROM (101 Newbury, Boston, Massachusetts: NEHGS), Births - Marriages - Deaths, son Josiah's marriage, recorded in Salisbury, Essex County, noted his parents were of Dighton. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850.

Nathaniel Shove1

Father*Nathaniel Shove1 b. 29 Jan 1668, d. b 1778
Mother*Hannah Baxter1

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.

Samuel Shove

b. 2 February 1789, d. 11 December 1874
Samuel Shove
ChartsDescendants of Nicholas Boulton, The Immigrant
Descendants of John Bolton and Zilpah Peirce
Father*Josiah Shove1,2 b. 18 Apr 1756
Mother*Joanna Dow3 b. 14 Nov 1755, d. 10 May 1796
Birth*2 February 1789Samuel Shove was born on 2 February 1789 in Mendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, the sixth of nine children. He was born in the part of Mendon that later became the village of Millville. His birth date is also included in the records of Uxbridge, Worcester County.4,3,1
Name VariationSamuel's full name may have been Samuel Asa SHOVE.
Apprenticeship*1803At the age of 14, Samuel Shove was apprenticed to his uncle, Squires Shove, of Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts, a tanner and currier. Before completing his apprenticeship, however, Samuel had mastered the trade and saved enough money to purchase the remainder of his time, which he did.1,3
Education*Samuel Shove had no formal schooling. The only education he received was gained by attendance at evening schools during his apprenticeship, and six months at a day school.3
Occupation*between 1811 and 1815He was a reader and a thinker and very much interested in the policies of the country. In 1811 Samuel Shove believed the United States would have war with England and knew that would cause a cutting off of supplies of manufactured goods, so he went into debt and built and stocked a mill in order to manufacture satinet, an imitation satin fabric, and a popular cloth for men's wear in those days. In the first year he paid off his indebtedness and had a profit margin as well. By 1813 he lived in Union Village, Rhode Island and owned the "Old Lyman Mill" in Woonsocket, Rhode Island.3,1
Marriage*1 July 1813Samuel Shove married first Lydia Buffum on 1 July 1813 in Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island. Following their marriage, they lived for a short time in Union Village, Rhode Island and in 1814, moved to Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island and lived, as reported in 1874, "where the Woonsocket Hotel is now."5,1,3,6
Residence1815 Just about a year after moving his family to Woonsocket, in 1815, Samuel had a terrible work accident that caused the loss of his left arm. He had run the belt off the woolen picker, and was picking a loose piece of wool from the front, when the teeth caught the back of his hand and tore the flesh from his arm, injuring the bone enough to require amputation just below the elbow. The surgery was performed by a carpenter with one of his saws under the supervision of a village doctor. The awkward manner of the operation caused, upon healing, the end of the bone to be exposed for nearly an inch and to correct it, Samuel was required to journey to Boston, for the nearest surgeon. The flesh was again opened and the bone once more sawed off.3
Residencebetween 1820 and 1825About the year 1820, Samuel purchased what, in 1874, had become known as the "Ephraim Coe farm" in Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island, and lived there with his family until 1825 when they moved to Providence.3
Religion17 October 1821Samuel Shove was a Quaker and joined the Society of Friends on 17 October 1821.3
Occupationbetween 1825 and 1837After moving to Providence, Samuel Shove was largely engaged in the manufacture of cotton and woolen goods, owning or running mills in Manchaug, Ironstone, Woonsocket and Fall River, and accumulating what was at that time considered a large fortune.3
Residence*between 1825 and 1840Around 1825, Samuel Shove and Lydia (Buffum) Shove moved to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, where Lydia died in 1835 and the rest of the family continued to live for the next six years. Most of their sixteen years in Providence, they lived in a double brick house on Benefit Street between College and Waterman streets, and Samuel was a charming host to all who visited, extending his hospitalities largely to visiting members of the Society of Friends and his many business associates. All who came under his roof were welcomed heartily and entertained liberally.

In Providence, Samuel was very active within the community. He was one of the first directors of the Globe Bank, organized in 1831, with William Sprague as President, and John R. Bartlett as cashier, and also for some years was a director in the American Insurance Company.

In politics, Samuel was an active and devoted member of the Whig Party, which was formed in 1832 to oppose the policies of President Andrew Jackson and the Democratic Party. In particular, the Whigs supported the supremacy of Congress over the Executive Branch and favored a program of modernization and economic development.

The Party's name was chosen to echo the American Whigs of the 1770s who fought for independence, and the Whig Party included among its members such national political personalities as Daniel Webster, William Henry Harrison, and their greatest leader, Henry Clay of Kentucky. In addition to Harrison, the Whig Party also counted four war heroes among its ranks, including Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. Its Illinois leader was Abraham Lincoln.

In its 26-year existence, the Whig Party saw two of its candidates elected President of the United States -- Harrison and Taylor -- and saw both of them die in office. Four months after succeeding Harrison, Whig President John Tyler was expelled from the Party, and Millard Fillmore, Taylor's Vice President, was the last Whig to hold the nation's highest office.

The party was ultimately destroyed by the question of whether to allow the expansion of slavery to the territories. Deep fissures in the membership on this question led the party to run Winfield Scott over its own incumbent President Fillmore in the presidential election of 1852. The Whig Party never elected another President. Its leaders quit politics (as Lincoln did temporarily) or changed parties. By 1856 the Party had ceased operations and the voter base defected in a variety of different directions. Samuel, in Illinois, followed Lincoln, and gave his hearty allegiance to the Republican Party at its first formation. He retained an intelligent interest in, and supported its activities, up to the last moment of his life. He believed strongly in the value of homeland business and "made in the USA" merchandise, and throughout his entire career lost no opportunity to defend that principle whenever and wherever he found the opportunity.

He had a clear head and sound judgment and never failed to give good counsel to all who sought it of him. His son, Josiah, wrote that Samuel Shove "led a very active life mentally and physically, and his ruling aim seemed to be to do whatsoever came to his hand with all his might, deeming all honest work honorable, and only scorning to eat the bread of idleness or of dishonesty."3,7
Census 1830*1 June 1830Samuel Shove appeared on the 1 June 1830 census as the Head of Household in East Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. There were seven members of the household, including one male aged 5-10 (Josiah), one male aged 15-20 (William), one male aged 40-50 (Samuel), one female aged 5-10 (Nancy), one female aged 10-15 (Hannah), one female aged 20-30 (likely a servant) and one female aged 40-50 (Lydia.)8
Marriage7 July 1836Samuel Shove married second Elizabeth Everett (Bolton) Brown, daughter of John Bolton and Zilpah Peirce, on 7 July 1836 in Trinity Episcopal Church, New York City, New York County, New York. Their marriage likely caused some concern among family and friends because she was a member of the Episcopalian Church and he was a Quaker and active member of the Society of Friends.
Religion*Although he remained attached to his Quaker faith and general principles of the Society throughout the remainder of his life, Samuel's formal association with the Society of Friends was dissolved as a result of his marriage to Elizabeth Bolton Brown, an Episcopalian.3
Occupationbetween 1837 and 1840Samuel Shove remained in the manufacturing business until 1840 and was very successful, having quite a few factories making different kinds of cloth. Unlike most of his friends, he weathered the financial crisis of 1837 and as a result had the opportunity to obtain unlimited credit. His not so fortunate business associates in Providence, Rhode Island, where he had lived for many years, came to him for his signature on notes so that they could get back into business again. He knew them for capable, honest men and felt sure they would repay their loans, and all was going fine until the crash of 1840. It occurred so soon after 1837 that they were not yet firmly established and went down, carrying him with them. Samuel sold everything at a sacrifice and paid off every cent of that indebtedness.1
Relocation*1840Now without resources, in 1840, at the age of fifty-one, with a family of five still to provide for, he borrowed $1,000 from his first wife's brother, possibly William, and in the fall of 1840 began the relocation of his family to Mount Hope, McLean County, Illinois, a colony of Rhode Island and Massachusetts people. He had a small farm of sixty acres on which he lived with his family for about seven years, performing with his one arm most of the work usually done on a farm by the more fortunate possession of two.3,1
Residence*1847About the year of 1847, Samuel Shove and Elizabeth E. Shove moved to Pope Creek, Knox County, Illinois, where Samuel continued to work a small piece of land and kept a stock of goods, enjoying the variety to be found in running a country store. Their two youngest children were with them in Pope Creek, and Elizabeth's daughter, Elizabeth Brown, age 21, had married Lucien Conger in 1845 and lived in Galesburg. Samuel's daughter, Nancy, had died in 1844 and his daughter, Hannah, had possibly already married Gershom Redway before her family moved from Providence. The whereabouts of the four older boys, all old enough to be on their own, William Shove at age 33, Josiah Shove at 23, James Brown, also 23 and George Brown at 19, remains a mystery to this researcher. William and Josiah Shove were still living in 1874, but James and George Brown have not yet been found.3
Residence1849In 1849, Samuel Shove and Elizabeth E. Shove moved with their family from Mount Hope to Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois.1
Underground Railroad*circa 1850One night the Shove's young daughter, Louisa, was awakened in the night in her upstairs bedroom in their Galesburg, Illinois house. She told her grandchildren, years later, of going sleepily downstairs as nine year olds will, and opening the door on a room filled with people -- her parents, some neighbors and some black strangers. She was hushed back to bed. And for a long time she did not know whether it was dream or memory. When she was older she realized that her parents' home had been a station on the Underground Railway.

In the 1850s the Underground Railroad existed in every State from Maine to Iowa, but mainly in Ohio and Illinois. It functioned without formal organization, officers, rules or maps. It was altogether spontaneous. The slaves fled across the border, appealed for help, found it, sent back word; others found the way, and soon scores of men were helping them, how many no one knows. Galesburg was the most important station in Illinois. The galleries of its Old First Church afforded hiding places for slaves. There were houses in the village and farms on the prairie whose occupants, like the Shoves, were ready to receive fugitives at any hour of the night. Each group worked in ignorance of the size of the movement or its ramifications. All they knew were the stations nearest and the men who went to and fro. There were no records, no statistics. The less they knew the better when it came to testifying in court. Passwords were arranged between those dealing with each other. The routes were frequently changed. It was the simplest organization imaginable and in its simplicity lay its success.9,10
Census 1850*24 September 1850Samuel Shove and Elizabeth E. Shove appeared on the 1850 census taken on 24 September 1850 in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois. Samuel's occupation was recorded as Merchant. The household was made up of Samuel, age 63, Elizabeth, 43, son Clarence Vinton, 13, and daughter, Louisa, age 9.11
Residence13 December 1853In 1853 the family moved to Mercer County and, by Warrant, Samuel Shove purchased federal land on 13 December 1853 in Mercer County, Illinois. The land, consisting of 40 acres, was located in Section Number 32, Township 14N, Range 2W of the 4th Principal Meridian of the County of Mercer, and had the legal description SESE.1,12
Residencebetween 1854 and 1864Samuel Shove and Elizabeth E. Shove made several shorter moves after relocating from Rhode Island to Illinois in 1840 and their actual pattern of movement was described differently by their daughter, Louisa Shove Conger, who was a very young child and with them at the time, and Josiah Shove, Samuel's grown son, who was not. Samuel, on a journey he made to New England in 1853, contracted an infection of his eyes which resulted within a year or two in a total loss of sight in one eye, and such impaired vision of the remaining one, he became no longer able to continue the work of his business. He was a much disciplined man however, with a very strong work ethic, and continued to make himself as useful as he possibly could. In 1857, following the loss of his sight, he and Elizabeth removed to Oneida, Knox County, Illinois, where they remained until Elizabeth's death in 1864.3
Census 1860*8 July 1860Samuel Shove and Elizabeth E. Shove appeared on the 1850 census taken on 8 July 1860 in Oneida, Knox County, Illinois. Samuel was 71 and lived with his wife Elizabeth who was 51.13
(Father-in-law) Residence1864Following the death of Elizabeth, his second wife, Samuel Shove went to live with the family of Lucien West Conger and Elizabeth Everett Brown his stepdaughter and son-in-law in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois. With the Congers he found all the loving care and diligent attention that his advancing years, combined with his helpless condition, were necessary for his comfort.3
(Husband) Death21 January 1864Samuel became a widower for the second time when Elizabeth E. Shove died on 21 January 1864.1
(Father-in-law) Census 187011 June 1870Samuel Shove appeared on the 1870 census taken on 11 June 1870 in the household of Lucien West Conger and Elizabeth Conger in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. Lucien was 46 and his occupation was Jeweler. The value of his real estate was recorded as $12,000 and his personal estate as $15,000. Elizabeth was 43 and keeping house. Included in the household were the couple's 14-year-old son Clarence LaForest Conger, recorded as "C. La Fay Conger", who was at school, and Edith B. Conger, believed to have been a relative and not yet identified, age 9 and born in Illinois, their newly married daughter Laura, age 17 and her husband, Alexander R. Webb, age 22, also a Jeweler, the 81-year-old Samuel Shove, Elizabeth Conger's stepfather, and a domestic, Mary Reil, born in Ireland, age 30.

The Crayton Hall Conger family also lived in Chicago Ward 5 in 1870, probably fairly near, since both families were enumerated by the same person only two days apart. In the other Conger household, Crayton was Lucien's brother and Louisa (Shove) Conger was Elizabeth's half-sister and Samuel Shove's daughter.14
(Father-in-law) Residence1873Samuel Shove moved with Lucien W. Conger and Elizabeth Conger in 1873 to Unionville, Putnam County, Missouri, and continued to live with them until his death in 1874.1,3
Death*11 December 1874Samuel Shove died on 11 December 1874 in Unionville, Putnam County, Missouri, at age 85.3,1
Burial*He was buried in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois.3,1

Family 1

Lydia Buffum b. 17 Oct 1787, d. 8 Sep 1833
Children1.William Buffum Shove1 b. Sep 1814
2.Hannah Baxter Shove1 b. 1818
3.Nancy Hacker Shove1 b. 1821, d. Jun 1844
4.Josiah Shove1 b. 8 Oct 1824
5.Thomas Shove3 b. bt Mar 1827 - Apr 1827, d. 1 Nov 1828

Family 2

Elizabeth Everett Bolton b. 30 May 1806, d. 21 Jan 1864
Children1.Clarence Vinton Shove+1 b. 25 Aug 1837, d. 10 Jan 1918
2.Thomas Shove1 b. c 1839, d. c 1839
3.Louisa Agnes Shove+1,15 b. 24 Jun 1841, d. c 1943

Citations

  1. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).
  2. [S44] Roy Henry Heaton, (Miles City, Montana). "Heaton Family Pedigree Chart - Eleven Generations", prepared by hand in 1941. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, some of the information and the dates, particularly, in this pedigree chart often prove to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented was a good place for us to start, and has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. Hereinafter cited as "Heaton Family Pedigree Chart - 1941."
  3. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  4. [S48] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850. CD-ROM (101 Newbury, Boston, Massachusetts: NEHGS), Births - Marriages - Deaths, Mendon town and C.R.1, from records of the First Congregational Society (Unitarian). Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850.
  5. [S14] James N. Arnold, Rhode Island Vital records, Vital Record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, first series, births, marriages, and deaths; a family register for the people, CD-ROM (Providence, RI: Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 1891; CD-ROM produced by CDventura, Inc., 1999), Index included in most of the 21 volumes, volume 7, page 173, Friends and Ministers, Smithfield Friends Record -- Marriages and volume 7, page 274, Friends and Ministers, Providence Friends Record -- Deaths. Hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1850.
  6. [S11] Owen A. Perkins, Buffum Family, Volume II (Buffalo, New York: Buffum Family Association Inc., 1983), pages 23, 43 and 87. Hereinafter cited as Buffum Family.
  7. [S253] The Whig Party (United States), online at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States), downloaded 22 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as Whig Party (United States).
  8. [S16] 1830 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Samuel Shove, Providence East Side of River, Providence County, Rhode Island, roll 168, page 19. Hereinafter cited as 1830 US Federal Census.
  9. [S240] Mary Lou Skinner Ross, Thoughts While Ironing. Warning: The publication contains no chapters or page numbers. (Atlanta, Georgia: Ross, Mary Lou Skinner, 1981). Hereinafter cited as Thoughts While Ironing.
  10. [S241] Earnest Elmo Calkins, They Broke the Prairie (New York, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1937), pages 226 - 228. Hereinafter cited as They Broke the Prairie.
  11. [S17] 1850 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Samuel Shove, Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois, roll M432_113, page 354, image 54. Hereinafter cited as 1850 US Federal Census.
  12. [S249] Illinois Public Domain Land Tract Database of the Illinois State Archives, online at http://www.library.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/…. Hereinafter cited as Illinois Public Domain Land Records.
  13. [S18] 1860 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Samuel Shove, Ontario, Knox County, Illinois, roll M653_195, page 486, image 152. Hereinafter cited as 1860 US Federal Census.
  14. [S37] 1870 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of L.W. Conger, Chicago Ward 5, Cook County, Illinois, roll M593_200, page 165, image 332. Hereinafter cited as 1870 US Federal Census.
  15. [S9] Compiled by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, transcribed from the original Conger Volumes published by Helen Maxine Cromwell in 1973, "Notes Taken From: The Conger Family of America", compiled on 10 Aug 1982 (Issaquah, Washington 98029), noting her place of birth incorrectly as Albany, New York. Hereinafter cited as "Conger Family Outline."

Squires Shove1

b. 1 March 1761
Father*Nathaniel Shove1 b. 29 Jan 1668, d. b 1778
Mother*Hannah Baxter1
Birth*1 March 1761Squires Shove was born on 1 March 1761 in Dighton, Bristol County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England), and likely recorded in Danvers, Essex County later when he moved to Danvers.2
Occupation*Squires Shove was a Tanner and Currier at Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts.1
(Uncle) Apprenticeship1803At the age of 14, Samuel Shove was apprenticed to his uncle, Squires Shove, of Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts, a tanner and currier. Before completing his apprenticeship, however, Samuel had mastered the trade and saved enough money to purchase the remainder of his time, which he did.3,1

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  2. [S48] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850. CD-ROM (101 Newbury, Boston, Massachusetts: NEHGS), Births - Marriages - Deaths. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850.
  3. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).

Thomas Shove

b. circa 1839, d. circa 1839
RelationshipsGrandson of John Bolton
4th great-grandson of Nicholas Boulton
ChartsDescendants of Nicholas Boulton, The Immigrant
Descendants of John Bolton and Zilpah Peirce
Father*Samuel Shove1 b. 2 Feb 1789, d. 11 Dec 1874
Mother*Elizabeth Everett Bolton b. 30 May 1806, d. 21 Jan 1864
Death*circa 1839Thomas Shove died at birth circa 1839 in Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.1,2

Citations

  1. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).
  2. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.

Thomas Shove1

Father*Nathaniel Shove1 b. 29 Jan 1668, d. b 1778
Mother*Hannah Baxter1

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.

Thomas Shove1

b. between March 1827 and April 1827, d. 1 November 1828
Father*Samuel Shove1 b. 2 Feb 1789, d. 11 Dec 1874
Mother*Lydia Buffum1 b. 17 Oct 1787, d. 8 Sep 1833
Birth*between March 1827 and April 1827Thomas Shove was born between March 1827 and April 1827 in Providence County, Rhode Island,1,2
Death*1 November 1828 and died at 19 months on 1 November 1828 at Providence, Providence County.

There is some confusion regarding the name of this child. The Vital Record of Rhode Island collection, under Friends and Ministers, Providence Friends Record--Births and Deaths, listed the birth of "Samuel" Shove to Samuel and Lydia, but the date was not noted, and also listed the 1 Nov 1828 death of "Samuel" Shove, of Samuel and Lydia. The same collection, under Newspaper Deaths from the Providence Journal, listed the death of "Thomas" Shove, son of Samuel, at 19 months of age on 1 Nov 1828. The Samuel Shove Obituary, written by his son Josiah Shove in 1874 said Samuel and Lydia's son "Thomas" died in infancy and in the "Grandma Conger Notes", Grandma Conger thought that "Thomas" had died at birth and was the son of Samuel and Elizabeth. It is believed by this researcher that there was probably only one son and that his name was probably Thomas.1,3,4

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  2. [S14] James N. Arnold, Rhode Island Vital records, Vital Record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, first series, births, marriages, and deaths; a family register for the people, CD-ROM (Providence, RI: Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 1891; CD-ROM produced by CDventura, Inc., 1999), Index included in most of the 21 volumes, Volume 13. Newspaper Deaths. Page 26. Providence Journal Deaths S-Z. "SHOVE Thomas of Samuel, aged 19 months, at Providence." It was dated Nov. 1, 1828 which may mean the date the item appeared in the newspaper or the actual date of his death. Hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1850.
  3. [S14] Rhode Island Vital records, Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, Volume 13, page 26, Newspaper Deaths--Providence Journal, and Volume 7, pages 260 and 264, Friends and Ministers, Providence Friends Record--Births and Deaths.
  4. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).

William Shove1

Father*Nathaniel Shove1 b. 29 Jan 1668, d. b 1778
Mother*Hannah Baxter1

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.

William Buffum Shove

b. September 1814
Father*Samuel Shove1 b. 2 Feb 1789, d. 11 Dec 1874
Mother*Lydia Buffum1 b. 17 Oct 1787, d. 8 Sep 1833
Birth*September 1814William Buffum Shove was born in September 1814 in Union Village, Providence County, Rhode Island.2
(Son) Residence1815Not long after William was born, his parents moved to Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island. Just about a year after moving his family to Woonsocket, in 1815, Samuel had a terrible work accident that caused the loss of his left arm. He had run the belt off the woolen picker, and was picking a loose piece of wool from the front, when the teeth caught the back of his hand and tore the flesh from his arm, injuring the bone enough to require amputation just below the elbow. The surgery was performed by a carpenter with one of his saws under the supervision of a village doctor. The awkward manner of the operation caused, upon healing, the end of the bone to be exposed for nearly an inch and to correct it, Samuel was required to journey to Boston, for the nearest surgeon. The flesh was again opened and the bone once more sawed off.2
Birth1817William Buffum Shove was born in 1817.2
(Son) Residencebetween 1820 and 1825About the year 1820, Samuel Shove and Lydia (Buffum) Shove purchased what, in 1874, had become known as the "Ephraim Coe farm" in Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island. William Buffum Shove lived there with his parents until 1825 when they moved to Providence.2
(Son) Residencebetween 1825 and 1840William Buffum Shove moved with his parents in between 1825 and 1840 to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, where the family lived for the next sixteen years. Where Lydia died in 1835 and the rest of the family continued to live for the next six years. Most of their sixteen years in Providence, they lived in a double brick house on Benefit Street between College and Waterman streets, and Samuel was a charming host to all who visited, extending his hospitalities largely to visiting members of the Society of Friends and his many business associates. All who came under his roof were welcomed heartily and entertained liberally.

In Providence, Samuel was very active within the community. He was one of the first directors of the Globe Bank, organized in 1831, with William Sprague as President, and John R. Bartlett as cashier, and also for some years was a director in the American Insurance Company.

In politics, Samuel was an active and devoted member of the Whig Party, which was formed in 1832 to oppose the policies of President Andrew Jackson and the Democratic Party. In particular, the Whigs supported the supremacy of Congress over the Executive Branch and favored a program of modernization and economic development.

The Party's name was chosen to echo the American Whigs of the 1770s who fought for independence, and the Whig Party included among its members such national political personalities as Daniel Webster, William Henry Harrison, and their greatest leader, Henry Clay of Kentucky. In addition to Harrison, the Whig Party also counted four war heroes among its ranks, including Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. Its Illinois leader was Abraham Lincoln.

In its 26-year existence, the Whig Party saw two of its candidates elected President of the United States -- Harrison and Taylor -- and saw both of them die in office. Four months after succeeding Harrison, Whig President John Tyler was expelled from the Party, and Millard Fillmore, Taylor's Vice President, was the last Whig to hold the nation's highest office.

The party was ultimately destroyed by the question of whether to allow the expansion of slavery to the territories. Deep fissures in the membership on this question led the party to run Winfield Scott over its own incumbent President Fillmore in the presidential election of 1852. The Whig Party never elected another President. Its leaders quit politics (as Lincoln did temporarily) or changed parties. By 1856 the Party had ceased operations and the voter base defected in a variety of different directions. Samuel, in Illinois, followed Lincoln, and gave his hearty allegiance to the Republican Party at its first formation. He retained an intelligent interest in, and supported its activities, up to the last moment of his life. He believed strongly in the value of homeland business and "made in the USA" merchandise, and throughout his entire career lost no opportunity to defend that principle whenever and wherever he found the opportunity.

He had a clear head and sound judgment and never failed to give good counsel to all who sought it of him. His son, Josiah, wrote that Samuel Shove "led a very active life mentally and physically, and his ruling aim seemed to be to do whatsoever came to his hand with all his might, deeming all honest work honorable, and only scorning to eat the bread of idleness or of dishonesty."2,3
(Son) Census 18301 June 1830William Buffum Shove likely appeared on the 1 June 1830 census in the household of his father Samuel Shove in East Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. There were seven members of the household, including one male aged 5-10 (Josiah), one male aged 15-20 (William), one male aged 40-50 (Samuel), one female aged 5-10 (Nancy), one female aged 10-15 (Hannah), one female aged 20-30 (likely a servant) and one female aged 40-50 (Lydia.)4
Residence*1874William Buffum Shove lived in 1874 at New York City, New York County, New York.2

Citations

  1. [S6] Interview with Grandma Conger, Louisa Shove Conger (1840-1942), by Mary Lou Heaton Skinner Ross, sometime before Grandma Conger's death in 1942. LHB Notebook - E-Mails and Letters (Santa Barbara, California).
  2. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.
  3. [S253] The Whig Party (United States), online at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whig_Party_(United_States), downloaded 22 Dec 2006. Hereinafter cited as Whig Party (United States).
  4. [S16] 1830 United States Federal Census, online at www.ancestry.com, Household of Samuel Shove, Providence East Side of River, Providence County, Rhode Island, roll 168, page 19. Hereinafter cited as 1830 US Federal Census.

Yet-Mercy Shove1

Father*Nathaniel Shove1 b. 29 Jan 1668, d. b 1778
Mother*Hannah Baxter1

Citations

  1. [S7] Obituary of Samuel Shove, submitted by his son Josiah Shove, pages 223-225, although some of the lineage information, especially of the early Shoves in America, has proved to be incorrect. (Names mixed up and at least one generation skipped.) Samuel's son Josiah likely wrote parts of the obituary from his memory of stories his father had told him. And, of course, neither of them had any first hand information of anything before Samuel's birth in 1789. From this researcher's point of view, other sources should be considered more reliable -- especially on events and people of the 1600s and 1700s, Necrology of the Rhode Island Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Industry, for the year 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, LHB Notebook - Books, News, & Online, Santa Barbara, California. Hereinafter cited as Shove Necrology - RI Society 1874.

Jacob Drell Showalter1

b. 1813
Father*Joseph Showalter1
Mother*Elizabeth ______1
Birth*1813Jacob Drell Showalter was born in 1813 in Berkeley County, Virginia.1
Marriage*12 March 1857He married, as her first husband, Louisa Rochester Hill, daughter of Rees Hill and Louise (__?__) Abbott, on 12 March 1857 in Frederick, Frederick County, Virginia.1,2

Family

Louisa Rochester Hill b. 1830

Citations

  1. [S1405] Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940.
  2. [S1272] Howard L. Leckey, The Tenmile Country and its Pioneer Families. A Genealogical History of the Upper Monongahela Valley (with surname index). (Apollo, Pennsylvania: Closson Press, August 1993), page 291. Hereinafter cited as The Tenmile Country.

Joseph Showalter1

Marriage*He married Elizabeth ______.1

Citations

  1. [S1405] Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940.