Andronicus Chesebrough1

b. 6 February 1629
Relationship2nd great-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*6 February 1629Andronicus Chesebrough was baptized on 6 February 1629 at Boston, Lincolnshire, England.1
Burial*8 February 1629He was buried just two days later on 8 February 1629 at Boston, Lincolnshire.2

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, page 17, referencing records in Boston, England.

David Chesebrough1

b. 9 September 1624
Relationship2nd great-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*9 September 1624David Chesebrough was baptized on 9 September 1624 at Boston, Lincolnshire, England.1
Burial*23 October 1624He was buried on 23 October 1624 at Boston, Lincolnshire.2

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, page 17, referencing records in Boston, England.

Elisha Chesebrough1

b. 4 June 1637, d. 1 September 1670
Relationship2nd great-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*4 June 1637Elisha Chesebrough was baptized on 4 June 1637 at Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Death*1 September 1670He died on 1 September 1670 in Stonington, Connecticut, at age 33.1

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.

Elisha Chesebrough1

b. 4 April 1667, d. 1 September 1727
RelationshipGreat-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*Samuel Chesebrough1 b. 1 Apr 1627
Mother*Abigail ______1
Birth*4 April 1667Elisha Chesebrough was born on 4 April 1667.1
(Children) Baptism of Family23 June 1672 On 23 June 1672 the following the children of Samuel and Abigail (__?__) Chesebrough were baptized by Simon Bradstreet at the First Church of New London, New London, New London County, Connecticut: Abigail Chesebrough, Samuel Chesebrough, William Chesebrough, Sarah Chesebrough, Elisha Chesebrough and Elizabeth Chesebrough. The notation in the source indicates the family had moved from Rehoboth, Massachusetts.2
Marriage*27 January 1692He married Marie Minor on 27 January 1692.1
Marriage*He married Rebecca Mason.1
Death*1 September 1727He died on 1 September 1727 at age 60.1

Family 1

Marie Minor b. 6 Oct 1671, d. 29 Nov 1704

Family 2

Rebecca Mason

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301; the source references the records of the First Church of New London, Connecticut, with the notation "Rehoboth" (quotes included).

Elizabeth Chesebrough1

b. 6 January 1669
RelationshipGreat-grandaunt of John Bolton
Father*Samuel Chesebrough1 b. 1 Apr 1627
Mother*Abigail ______1
Birth*6 January 1669Elizabeth Chesebrough was born on 6 January 1669.1
(Children) Baptism of Family23 June 1672 On 23 June 1672 the following the children of Samuel and Abigail (__?__) Chesebrough were baptized by Simon Bradstreet at the First Church of New London, New London, New London County, Connecticut: Abigail Chesebrough, Samuel Chesebrough, William Chesebrough, Sarah Chesebrough, Elisha Chesebrough and Elizabeth Chesebrough. The notation in the source indicates the family had moved from Rehoboth, Massachusetts.2
Marriage*She married William Ingraham.1

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301; the source references the records of the First Church of New London, Connecticut, with the notation "Rehoboth" (quotes included).

Jabez Chesebrough1

b. 3 May 1635
Relationship2nd great-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Death*He died young.2
Baptism*3 May 1635Jabez Chesebrough was baptized on 3 May 1635 at Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, biographical sketch of William Chesebrough, pages 7-15 and page 17.

John Chesebrough1

b. 2 September 1632, d. 1650
Relationship2nd great-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*2 September 1632John Chesebrough was baptized on 2 September 1632 at Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Death*1650He died from a wound by a scythe in 1650 at age 18,2
Burial* and was the first English person to be buried in Stonington, Connecticut.2

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, biographical sketch of William Chesebrough, pages 7-15 and page 17.

Jonathan Chesebrough1

b. 9 September 1624, d. 1630
Relationship2nd great-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*9 September 1624Jonathan Chesebrough was baptized on 9 September 1624 at Boston, Lincolnshire, England.1
Death*1630He died during the family's passage to America in 1630.1

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.

Joseph Chesebrough1

b. 18 July 1640
Relationship2nd great-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*18 July 1640Joseph Chesebrough was baptized on 18 July 1640 at Braintree, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Death*He died young.2

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, biographical sketch of William Chesebrough, pages 7-15 and page 17.

Junia Chesebrough1

b. 6 February 1629
Relationship2nd great-grandaunt of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*6 February 1629Junia Chesebrough, a stillborn twin, was baptized on 6 February 1629 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England.1
Burial*6 February 1629She was buried the same day on 6 February 1629 at Boston, Lincolnshire.2

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, page 17, referencing records in Boston, England.

Marie Chesebrough1

b. 2 May 1622
Relationship2nd great-grandaunt of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*2 May 1622Marie Chesebrough was baptized on 2 May 1622 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England.1
Burial*9 June 1622She was buried on 9 June 1622 at Boston, Lincolnshire.2

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, page 17, referencing records in Boston, England.

Marie Chesebrough1

b. 28 February 1658, d. 25 September 1669
RelationshipGreat-grandaunt of John Bolton
Father*Samuel Chesebrough1 b. 1 Apr 1627
Mother*Abigail ______1
Birth*28 February 1658Marie Chesebrough was born on 28 February 1658.1
Death*25 September 1669She died on 25 September 1669 at age 11.1

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.

Martha Chesebrough1

b. 18 September 1623
Relationship2nd great-grandaunt of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*18 September 1623Martha Chesebrough was baptized on 18 September 1623 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England.1
Burial*26 September 1623She was buried on 26 September 1623 at Boston, Lincolnshire.2

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, page 17, referencing records in Boston, England.

Nathaniel Chesebrough1

b. 25 January 1630, d. 22 November 1678
Relationship2nd great-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*25 January 1630Nathaniel Chesebrough was baptized on 25 January 1630 at Boston, Lincolnshire, England.1
Death*22 November 1678He died on 22 November 1678 in Stonington, New London County, Connecticut, at age 48.2

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Part II, Descendants of Nathaniel, pages 302-474.

Samuel Chesebrough1

b. 1 April 1627
Relationship2nd great-grandfather of John Bolton
Father*William Chesebrough1 b. 1594
Mother*Anne Stevenson1
Baptism*1 April 1627Samuel Chesebrough was baptized on 1 April 1627 at Boston, Lincolnshire, England.1
Marriage*30 November 1655He married Abigail ______ on 30 November 1655.2,3
Freeman*1657Samuel was made a Freeman of Pawcatuck (Stonington), New London County, Connecticut, in 1657, meaning he was legally recognized as a white male over 21 years of age holding full rights of citizenship, being free to engage in a trade or business, own land, and to vote. He signed the Pawcatuck Articles of Association in 1658 and was elected Constable. He was a Selectman in 1660 and Deputy to the General Court in 1665 and 1666, and then again from 1670 through 1673.2
Baptism of Family*23 June 1672 On 23 June 1672 the following the children of Samuel and Abigail (__?__) Chesebrough were baptized by Simon Bradstreet at the First Church of New London, New London, New London County, Connecticut: Abigail Chesebrough, Samuel Chesebrough, William Chesebrough, Sarah Chesebrough, Elisha Chesebrough and Elizabeth Chesebrough. The notation in the source indicates the family had moved from Rehoboth, Massachusetts.4
Burial*31 July 1673He was buried on 31 July 1673 in Stonington, Connecticut.2

Family

Abigail ______
Children1.Abigail Chesebrough2 b. 30 Sep 1656
2.Marie Chesebrough2 b. 28 Feb 1658, d. 25 Sep 1669
3.Samuel Chesebrough2 b. 20 Nov 1660, d. 27 Oct 1735
4.William Chesebrough2 b. 8 Apr 1662, d. 2 Jan 1739/40
5.Sarah Chesebrough+2 b. 24 Dec 1663, d. 24 Oct 1743
6.Elisha Chesebrough2 b. 4 Apr 1667, d. 1 Sep 1727
7.Elizabeth Chesebrough2 b. 6 Jan 1669

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), page 17. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301.
  3. [S472] Thomas and Manasseh Minor, The Minor Diaries, Stonington, Connecticut: Thomas 1653 to 1684 and Manasseh 1696 to 1720 (reprinted in 2001 by Edward Brothers Inc., Lillington, North Carolina: The Thomas Minor Society, 1993), Thomas, page 16. Hereinafter cited as The Minor Diaries.
  4. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301; the source references the records of the First Church of New London, Connecticut, with the notation "Rehoboth" (quotes included).

Samuel Chesebrough1

b. 20 November 1660, d. 27 October 1735
RelationshipGreat-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*Samuel Chesebrough1 b. 1 Apr 1627
Mother*Abigail ______1
Birth*20 November 1660Samuel Chesebrough was born on 20 November 1660.1
(Children) Baptism of Family23 June 1672 On 23 June 1672 the following the children of Samuel and Abigail (__?__) Chesebrough were baptized by Simon Bradstreet at the First Church of New London, New London, New London County, Connecticut: Abigail Chesebrough, Samuel Chesebrough, William Chesebrough, Sarah Chesebrough, Elisha Chesebrough and Elizabeth Chesebrough. The notation in the source indicates the family had moved from Rehoboth, Massachusetts.2
Marriage*He married Marie Ingraham.1
Death*27 October 1735He died on 27 October 1735 at age 74.1

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301; the source references the records of the First Church of New London, Connecticut, with the notation "Rehoboth" (quotes included).

Sarah Chesebrough1

b. 24 December 1663, d. 24 October 1743
RelationshipGreat-grandmother of John Bolton
ChartsDescendants of Nicholas Boulton, The Immigrant
Father*Samuel Chesebrough1 b. 1 Apr 1627
Mother*Abigail ______1
Birth*24 December 1663Sarah Chesebrough was born on 24 December 1663.1
(Children) Baptism of Family23 June 1672 On 23 June 1672 the following the children of Samuel and Abigail (__?__) Chesebrough were baptized by Simon Bradstreet at the First Church of New London, New London, New London County, Connecticut: Abigail Chesebrough, Samuel Chesebrough, William Chesebrough, Sarah Chesebrough, Elisha Chesebrough and Elizabeth Chesebrough. The notation in the source indicates the family had moved from Rehoboth, Massachusetts.2
Marriage*8 March 1683She married John Bolton, son of Nicholas Boulton and Elizabeth ______, on 8 March 1683. Thomas Minor performed the marriage ceremony and recorded the event in his diary. "The ffirst moneth is march, hath .31. days.... .1683.... and Thursday the .8. day I was at the mill and maried John bolten, Rezident in stoneington, and sarah Cheesbrough of the same towne...."1,3
(Wife) Death21 December 1721Sarah became a widow when John Bolton died on 21 December 1721.4
(Widow) Administration4 April 1722Sarah (Chesebrough) Bolton, widow of the deceased John Bolton, and John Bolton Jr., the couple's eldest son, were appointed Administrators on the deceased's estate on 4 April 1722 by Isaac Winslow, Judge of the Probate of Wills and for Granting Administrations in Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).5,4
(Administrator) Inventory12 April 1722The Inventory of the estate of John Bolton, late of Bridgewater, was appraised and completed by Joseph Edson, Nathaniel Brett and John Field on 12 April 1722. They appeared before Josiah Edson Esq., Justice of the Peace, on 7 May and made an oath to its accuracy according to their best judgment. Administrators John Bolton Jr. and Sarah (Chesebrough) Bolton appeared before Judge Isaac Winslow to approve the submitted inventory, making their oath that it was a true and perfect inventory as far as it came to their knowledge and when more should appear, they would give it to the Judge, and the document was filed with the court on 7 May 1722.

The value of his housing and about 53 acres of land being part of two 50 acre lots was appraised at £340; 4 oxen, 3 cows, 1 heifer, 1 mare and 5 swine were valued at £43, 18s; his farming tools at £13, 1s, 6p, 1 feather bed, bedstead and covering at £7, 5s, wooden vessels and lumber at £4, 7s, Indian Corn at £4, household furniture at £2, iron vessels and utensils about the fire at £2, 10s, a warming iron, glass and earthen vessels at 16s, pewter platters and plates at £1, 18s, a bag of cotton wool, cards and table linen at £1, 6s, 2 pounds of woolen yarn and 1 meal bag at 8s, books appraised at £2, 3s, and his wearing apparel at £4, 11s, 6p.5,4
Guardianship*4 June 1722When Sarah's husband, John Bolton died the previous year, the couple had three minor children, Joseph, Nathaniel and Abigail Bolton. Joseph at age 17 and Nathaniel at age 15, both being under the age of 21 and above the age of 14 were, under the law, permitted to choose their own guardians. Both Joseph and Nathaniel chose their mother, Sarah (Chesebrough) Bolton, who was approved by the court on 4 June 1722. Abigail, who was only 12, was under the age of 14, and the court appointed Sarah guardian of Abigail, as well.

Sarah's guardianship duties to all three of her minor children, as instructed by the court, were to take them into her care and tuition until their majority at age 21. She was directed, for each child, to take into her hands and possession, to their benefit, their estates, lands, moneys, goods and chattels for the purpose of improving them in such a manner as she should judge best for them. She was also instructed to submit a plain and true account of her guardianship for each upon oath, and to include all and singular such estate that came into her hands and possession by virtue of her guardianship, and to account for the profits and improvements of each of the minor children's estates. She would be lawfully required to pay and deliver the accounting, and as much of the estate remaining, after first being examined and allowed by the appropriate judge, as each child reached the age of full majority.6,7
(Widow) Estate and Land5 April 1723The personal estate of Sarah's husband, John Bolton, late of Bridgewater, after the payment of debts and charges, was divided by agreement between Sarah, his widow, and their children.

A special committee of five good and sufficient freeholders, Josiah Edson Esq., Nathaniel Hayward, Joseph Edson, Nathaniel Brett and John Field, was appointed by Judge Isaac Winslow to determine a fair distribution of real estate that John Bolton died seized of in the County of Plymouth. The committee's task was completed on 5 April 1723 and included setting off the widow Sarah's Dower or Thirds of housing and lands, and also setting off an equitable portion or share of land for each of the couple's ten children.

Sarah's portion began from the town lot at the east end, beginning at a great tree fallen down near the river with a stub of a limb standing upward marked upon two sides, and from there running north-westerly to a great black oak marked on two sides and so keeping the same range the whole breadth of the lot; and from the upper lot, she received that part of the lot between the highway and the lands of her son, John Bolton Jr., twenty-six pole in breadth on the easterly side bounded by a small forked apple tree at the foot of the hill and keeping the same breadth throughout. Additionally, out of the housing, she was allotted the fourth room below, a quarter part of the cellar, a quarter of the barn, and a third part of the fruit of the orchard, yearly. Sarah's daughter Mary received the other two-thirds of the buildings and orchard.4,5
(Mother) Estate and Land25 September 1730Sarah's daughter, Mary Bolton, had died intestate and the settlement and distribution of her real estate was completed on 25 September 1730. Mary's estate was divided into ten equal shares and distributed between her mother, Sarah (Chesebrough) Bolton, and brothers and sisters, John Bolton, Samuel Bolton, Sarah (Bolton) Leonard, Elizabeth (Bolton) May, Nicholas Bolton, Elisha Bolton, Joseph Bolton, Nathaniel Bolton, and Abigail Bolton.

A special committee of five freeholders consisting of Joseph Alden, whose land bordered the deceased's, and Joseph Edson, Eleazer Carver, Daniel Hudson and Jonathan Sprague had earlier been appointed by Judge Isaac Winslow on 15 June 1730 to inventory Mary's land and to determine, in their best judgment, an equitable division of her real estate, which they estimated to be 6 acres. Their recommendation, submitted to the court on 10 August 1730 and approved on 21 August 1730, distributed the lands into ten equal shares or lots.

Sarah's share was part of the lot identified as the eighth, ninth and tenth shares, which were distributed together as one larger lot to Sarah, and to two of her children, Samuel and Abigail Bolton. The lot was on the east end and joining to the lot distributed to Sarah's eldest daughter, Sarah (Bolton) Leonard, and also joined to the southerly side of the easterly end of the lot distributed to her second daughter, Elizabeth (Bolton) May. The combined share contained about 18 rods of land, together with the Bolton house, and began at a stake and heap of stones which was at the south-east corner of the lot, and from there ranged north 30 degrees east 4 rods and 1/4 to a stake and heap of stones standing near an apple tree, and from there ranged south 56 degrees east 7 rods to a stake and heap of stones standing by the highway and bounded by the highway 8 rods to the bounds first mentioned at the south-east corner of the combined share.8,9
Death*24 October 1743She was probably the Widow Bolton who died on 24 October 1743 in Bridgewater, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England), at age 79.10,11,12,13,9,8
Administration*10 July 1744Sarah died intestate, and her estate was opened for Administration on 10 July 1744 in Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England). Her eldest son, John Bolton, a yeoman of Bridgewater, was appointed Administrator. His duties, as described by Judge John Cushing Esq., were to accept the full power entrusted to him by the court and to administer all and singular goods, chattels, rights and credits of the deceased, and to sell and faithfully dispose of them according to law. And also to gather, levy, recover and receive all and whatsoever credits were owed to his mother at the time of her death, and to pay all debts she owed so far as her goods, chattels, rights and credits could cover. John was further instructed to make and exhibit a true and perfect inventory of the estate, including all and singular goods, chattels, rights and credits, into the registry of the Court of Probate for the County of Plymouth on or before 10 July 1745 and to render a plain and true account of his administration of his mother's estate. No additional documents, or the final accounting, were found in the probate packet.12,13

Family

John Bolton b. c 1660, d. 21 Dec 1721
Children1.Sarah Bolton+1 b. 26 Dec 1683
2.John Bolton+1 b. 21 May 1686, d. 5 Jun 1755
3.Samuel Bolton1 b. 6 Dec 1688, d. 30 May 1753
4.Elizabeth Bolton1 b. 24 Apr 1692, d. 22 Jan 1770
5.Nicholas Bolton1 b. 17 Apr 1695, d. 2 Mar 1750
6.Mary Bolton1 b. 29 Oct 1697, d. b 13 Mar 1728
7.Elisha Bolton+1 b. 9 Mar 1700, d. 26 Feb 1777
8.Joseph Bolton+1 b. 27 Jul 1704, d. 12 Mar 1751
9.Nathaniel Bolton+1 b. 5 May 1706, d. 8 Aug 1770
10.Abigail Bolton+1 b. 21 Mar 1709

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301; the source references the records of the First Church of New London, Connecticut, with the notation "Rehoboth" (quotes included).
  3. [S472] Thomas and Manasseh Minor, The Minor Diaries, Stonington, Connecticut: Thomas 1653 to 1684 and Manasseh 1696 to 1720 (reprinted in 2001 by Edward Brothers Inc., Lillington, North Carolina: The Thomas Minor Society, 1993), page 176. Hereinafter cited as The Minor Diaries.
  4. [S1124] John Bolton, Probate (1723 Bridgewater, Plymouth County) Case number 2216, Box 107049 on FHL Film# 2426726. Probate file papers 1686-1881, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; microfilm of records at Supreme Judicial Court, Boston, on 246 microfilm reels. LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as Probate of John Bolton (1723 Bridgewater).
  5. [S624] Probate records, 1686-1903; with index and docket, 1685-1967, Massachusetts Probate Court (Plymouth County), microfilm of originals at Plymouth, Massachusetts on 157 microfilm reels filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, 1968. Includes Index. LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, FHL Film# 549782, Index and Docket Abe-Bur 1685-1881, Case number 2216; FHL Film# 550705, Index to probates 1686-1820; FHL Film# 550510, Probates 1717-1724, Volume 4, pages 322-324; FHL Film# 550511, Probates 1724-1731, Volume 5, pages 643-649. Hereinafter cited as Plymouth County Massachusetts Probate (Index) 1686-1903.
  6. [S624] Plymouth County Massachusetts Probate (Index) 1686-1903, FHL Film# 549782, Index and Docket Abe-Bur 1685-1881, Case number 2221; FHL Film# 550705, Index to probates 1686-1820; FHL Film# 550510, Probates 1717-1724, Volume 4, pages 331-332.
  7. [S1126] Joseph, Nathaniel and Abigail Bolton, Guardianship (1722 Bridgewater, Plymouth County) Case number 2221, Box 107049 on FHL Film# 2426726. Probate file papers 1686-1881, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; microfilm of records at Supreme Judicial Court, Boston, on 246 microfilm reels. LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as Guardianship for Joseph, Nathaniel and Abigail Bolton (1722 Bridgewater).
  8. [S1127] Mary Bolton, Probate (1730 Bridgewater, Plymouth County) Case number 2220, Box 107049 on FHL Film# 2426726. Probate file papers 1686-1881, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; microfilm of records at Supreme Judicial Court, Boston, on 246 microfilm reels. LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as Probate of Mary Bolton (1730 Bridgewater).
  9. [S624] Plymouth County Massachusetts Probate (Index) 1686-1903, FHL Film# 549782, Index and Docket Abe-Bur 1685-1881, Case number 2220; FHL Film# 550705, Index to probates 1686-1820; FHL Film# 550511, Probates 1724-1731, Volume 5, pages 704-705, 780-786 and 789-790.
  10. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301, noted her date of death as 9 September 1729. However the date is not believed to be correct. Sarah's estate was not probated until 1744, and evidence suggests that Sarah was alive on 25 September 1730 when she received a distribution of land from the estate of her deceased daughter, Mary.
  11. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, noting the death of Widow Bolton on 24 October 1743 and referencing a source that may be incorrect since 1743 was not within the dates identified. The source referenced P.R.4: citing a private record, from a record of deaths kept from 1766 to 1820 by Oliver Alden, and from 1820 to 1846 by his son, Caleb Alden, and grandson, Cromwell Alden, or members of the family, now in the possession of the Bridgewater Public Library. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  12. [S624] Plymouth County Massachusetts Probate (Index) 1686-1903, FHL Film# 549782, Index and Docket Abe-Bur 1685-1881, Case number 2225; FHL Film# 550705, Index to probates 1686-1820; FHL Film# 551533, Probates 1742-1745, Volume 9, page 314.
  13. [S1125] Sarah (Chesebrough) Bolton, Probate (1744 Bridgewater, Plymouth County) Case number 2225, Box 107049 on FHL Film# 2426726. Probate file papers 1686-1881, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; microfilm of records at Supreme Judicial Court, Boston, on 246 microfilm reels. LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as Probate of Sarah (Chesebrough) Bolton (1744 Bridgewater).

William Chesebrough

b. 1594
Relationship3rd great-grandfather of John Bolton
Biographical Info*

William Chesebrough, the first settler of English lineage in the town of Stonington, Connecticut, was born in England in 1594. His place of his birth and the names of his parents have not yet, with certainty, been determined. The probabilities are that he was born in or near Boston, Lincolnshire, where he is known to have had his residence some eleven or twelve years prior to his emigration to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in America, and where he and his wife were communicants in St. Botolph's Church. The home of the Chesebrough family was in the eastern counties of England, and the name occurs in the public registries of Wills in the County of Norfolk, which adjoins Lincolnshire. Sarah Chesebrough, whose name was No. 78 on the roll of the First Church of Boston, Massachusetts, was doubtless a passenger with William on the ship Arbella, and is thought to have been his mother. His wife, Anna, and three surviving children of the eight that had been born to him -- the youngest, Nathaniel, an infant in arms -- came with him in the same company. The Arbella, a ship of three hundred and fifty tons, with Captain Peter Milborne as master, received its name "in honour of the Lady Arbella," wife of Isaac Johnson, Esq., one of the more prominent people among the passengers. This ship was one of a fleet of fourteen vessels with eight hundred and forty passengers, comprising the Massachusetts Bay Colony. It set sail from Cowes, Isle of Wight, on Tuesday, March 30, 1630, and was termed the "Admiral" of the fleet, for the reason partly, that it was the staunchest and best furnished of the vessels, and partly perhaps, as Savage in his notes in Winthrop's Journal suggests, that it was owned by and carried "the principal people" of the Colony, including Johnson, Winthrop, Coddington, Dudley, Bradstreet and Saltonstall with their respective families among others.

The first thirty-six years of William Chesebrough's life were closing when he set foot upon American soil. They covered the last nine years of Queen Elizabeth's reign, the entire reign of James I, and the first five years of the reign of the ill-fated Charles I, and they were among the most eventful years in the history of England. Mary, Queen of Scots, was beheaded only seven years before Chesebrough's birth; and only six years before, the first issue of the first English newspaper was printed, and the Spanish Armada was destroyed. It was the period in which Edmund Spencer, William Shakespeare and Lord Bacon won their undying fame; in which, the first telescopes were invented, and in which also the authorized version of the Bible was prepared by order of King James. He was eleven years old at the time of the Gunpowder Plot; thirteen when Jamestown, Virginia, was founded; twenty when New Amsterdam (now New York) was settled by the Dutch and twenty-six when the Pilgrim Fathers landed upon Plymouth Rock.

The corruptions in both Church and State in England, the high-handed and cruel measures of the Courts of High Commission and of the Star Chamber to crush out all freedom of thought and speech and worship, the insecurity of life and property, and the civil and religious disintegration which threatened ruin to the nation, prompted many of the better class of the clergy and of the people to sacrifice their homes and seek an asylum where they could enjoy a rational liberty. The immigrants who came to New England with the illustrious Winthrop, organized their churches on the simple polity of a self-governing brotherhood. Such an organization was effected in their new settlement which they named Charlestown, on the 30th of July, 1630, with Rev. John Wilson as teacher, but in the course of three months it was transferred to the south side of the Charles River to Boston, which the majority preferred on the score of healthiness, as the place for a permanent settlement. The names of William and Anna Chesebrough appear as Nos. 44 and 45, on the roll of the original members of this, the First Church of Boston. When Rev. John Cotton, their former Minister at St. Botolph's in England, came over some three years later, he took the place of Mr. Wilson as teacher of the church, and Mr. Wilson was chosen as the pastor.

The government of the new colony was administered under a charter granted by Charles I to "The Governor and Company of Massachusetts Bay in New England," bearing date March 4, 1639. On the emigration to America of the leading members of this Corporation, the Corporation itself with all its powers and privileges was transferred to them and the other freemen of the company who should inhabit the new plantation. Thus the administrative officers of the company became "The General Court of Massachusetts," which took charge of the civil government, and John Winthrop was chosen governor. Under this government, William Chesebrough was made a freeman in May, 1631. It soon became necessary to order the several towns which had been organized by the colonists, to choose each two deputies to appear at the Court, for the purpose of concerting a plan for a public treasury and for levying taxes for the support of the government. William Colburn, who was deacon of the Church, and William Chesebrough, were appointed upon this service as the first deputies or representatives of Boston. This was the entering wedge to the yearly representation of the towns in the legislative body. Mr. Chesebrough filled other responsible positions in the young municipality. He was chosen constable, an office equivalent to what would now be called " high sheriff," and subsequently an assessor of rates, and again one of a committee to allot to "the able bodied men and youth" grounds for planting.

For the purpose of obtaining more arable land and pasture than was assigned to them within the limits of Boston, Mr. Chesebrough, with many others, removed their residences a few miles southward, near to a promontory called Mount Wollaston, in 1637 or 1638. A church was organized for the growing community, September 17, 1639, to which he and his wife brought letters of dismission and recommendations from the Boston church on the 6th of the ensuing February. This Mount Wollaston section was set off the same year as a distinct town and named Braintree, and Mr. Chesebrough, with Stephen Kinsley, was chosen to represent the new municipality in the General Court. He was appointed commissioner or local judge to try certain classes of cases which came up for adjudication, and held also other responsible positions. The grounds he occupied are those which have constituted for more than two and a half centuries the old homestead of the Adams family, and are now included within the limits of the city of Quincy. The late Ex-President, John Quincy Adams, informed the writer that the deed of transfer given by William Chesebrough to his ancestor was still in his possession.

In the course of two or three years the subject of this sketch joined a company which settled at " Seekonk," in the vicinity of the Plymouth Colony. Early in July, 1644, he with twenty-nine others of the resident planters there, entered into a civil compact, agreeing to be governed by nine persons, "according to law and equity, until we shall subject ourselves jointly to some other government." It appears that this compact and agreement was drawn up and carried through by Mr. Chesebrough's efforts, for on the12th of July following, at a public meeting, his efficient services in setting up the new government were gratefully acknowledged by the enactment of a provision, " that he should have division in all lands of Seekonk, for one hundred and fifty-three pounds, besides what he is to have for his own proportion, and that in the way of consideration for the pains and charges he hath been at in setting off this platantion."

The question of jurisdiction was settled by the plantation submitting itself to the government of the Plymouth Colony, rather than that of Massachusetts Bay, and it was incorporated by the Scriptural name of Rehoboth. This decision was arrived at contrary to Chesebrough's wishes and judgment, and the Plymouth authorities took his opposition as an affront, and treated him harshly. Feeling deeply the prejudice awakened against him, he mounted his horse, and in company with one of his sons, turned his face westward with a view of finding a place of settlement where he could escape unjust treatment and live in peace. On this tour of about seventy miles along the coast, he carefully noted the different localities on the route until he reached Pequot, now New London. John Winthrop Jr., an old acquaintance, under commission of the General Court of Massachusetts, had charge of a new settlement at Pequot, and he was strongly urged to make this place his permanent abode. But the location did not suit him, although a town-lot was offered him as an inducement. After successive explorations he made choice of the head of Wequetequock cove, in what was called Pawcatuck, on the bordering lands of which he found arable lands for planting, with an abundance of pasture ground for stock raising, to which he had largely turned his attention. To this place, after having built a dwelling house on the west side of the cove, he removed with his wife and four sons, assisted by his friend, Roger Williams, in the summer of 1649. At this time he was fifty-five years old, his wife fifty-one, his son Samuel twenty-two, Nathaniel nineteen, John seventeen, and Elisha twelve. John died from a wound by a scythe in 1650, at the age of eighteen, and was the first white person whose remains were buried in Stonington.

Singularly enough, he had hardly become domiciled in his new home, when a trouble came upon him similar to that from which he had just fled. Connecticut was about as jealous of Massachusetts as was Plymouth, and unfriendly persons belonging to Plymouth, took advantage of this fact to awaken the suspicions of the Connecticut authorities against him. The trumped-up charge was that he had taken up his present residence with a view of carrying on an unlawful this charge. Supposing that he was within the jurisdiction of Massachusetts, he refused for a year or more to pay any attention to the order of the Court; but afterwards on the advice of Mr. Winthrop and his friends at Pequot, he voluntarily presented himself before the Court at Hartford and refuted the slanderous charge, in support of which not a particle of evidence was presented. Ostensibly as a measure of precaution, he was required to give a bond not to engage in any trade with the Indians forbidden by the Laws of the Colony, and before the succeeding winter to furnish the Court with the names of such persons as he could persuade to settle in his neighborhood. On these conditions permission was given him to remain unmolested where he was. This action of the Court was largely prompted by a jealousy of all settlers in that section who were supposed to be favorable to the Massachusetts claims, lest that Colony should get the control of the Pawcatuck territory. It now became a burning question as to which Colony this territory belonged, -- whether to Connecticut or Massachusetts. Connecticut attempted to steal the march on the sister Colony by a public act making the Pawcatuck River the eastern boundary of Pequot, so that Chesebrough's place of settlement came within the boundaries of that town. On this basis the town not only voted him a house-lot within the Pequot settlement itself, but also confirmed his title to three hundred acres of land at Wequetequock, which were subsequently increased to twenty-three hundred and sixty-two acres.

The first man who joined Mr. Chesebrough in the new plantation was Thomas Stanton, the famous Indian interpreter, who in 1650 built a trading-house on the west tide of Pawcatuck River, though he did not move his family there until 1657. In the year 1653, Walter Palmer, one of the settlers at Rehoboth, dissatisfied for house on the east side of Wequetequock Cove. Thomas Minor moved into the neighborhood in 1654, and built his house at Mistuxet, now Quiambaug. These four men: Chesebrough, Stanton, Palmer and Minor, were the founders of Stonington, in honor of whom the monument in the ancient cemetery at Wequetequock was erected in 1899, that being the two hundred and fiftieth year from the first settlement by Mr. Chesebrough.

The action of the General Court of Connecticut in pushing its claims eastward to the Pawcatuck River, was by no means acquiesced in by Massachusetts, and the seriously disputed question of jurisdiction was referred to the Commissioners of the United Colonies for decision. Meanwhile, Acting on this advice, the original settlers and a few others who had joined them, met together on the 30th of June, 1658, and organized a local government constitution, entitled " The and his son Thomas, Walter Palmer and his two sons, Elihu and Moses, George Denison, and Thomas Shaw. This compact is in the handwriting of William Chesebrough and pledged the signers " to maintain and deffend the peac of the plac & to aid and asist one another acoarding to law & rules of righteousnes, till such other provition be maide ffor us as may atain our end above written." After affixing their names to the document, the signers chose Captain George Denison and William Chesebrough to be "comytioners" to carry out the provisions of the contract. Three months later the Commissioners of the United Colonies decided that the territory in dispute belonged to Massachusetts, and the General Court of that Colony named it Southertown and annexed it to the County of Suffolk. Southertown remained a township of Massachusetts until the issue of the Charter of Connecticut by King Charles II, dated April 25, 1662, which fixed the eastern boundary of Connecticut at Pawcatuck River, thereupon this territory which for three and a half years had been subject to the control of Massachusetts, reverted back to the sister Colony. Through this period Mr. Chesebrough held the office of selectman.

During the time in which the plantation was included in the town of Pequot, Mr. Chesebrough had been elected its deputy to the General Court of Connecticut at Hartford in 1653, 1654, 1655, and 1656; he held also the offices of assessor and commissioner. On its reversion to Connecticut under the charter, some of the planters manifested an almost defiant unwillingness to acknowledge the jurisdiction of this Colony, at which the authorities at Hartford took offense. In 1664, however, they united in choosing William Chesebrough as their first representative to the General Court. With much effort and considerable delay, he was successful in adjusting the disturbed relations between them and the court. In 1665, the name of Southertown was changed to that of Mystic, and in the year following to Stonington. During the last three years of his life, which closed on Sunday, the 9th day of June, 1667, he being then seventy-three years old, Mr. Chesebrough was selectman of the town. His wife, Mrs. Anna Chesebrough, died on the 24th day of August, 1773, at the age of seventy-five. Their remains rest side by side in the old cemetery, a short distance from their dwelling-house.




This brief sketch of the life of William Chesebrough makes it clearly evident that he was a strong character, -- a man well fitted in capacity and high purpose to be a pioneer in laying the foundations of a well-ordered, civil and religious community. Mature in years, of a well-balanced mind, wise in counsel, a man of positive convictions, and withal of uncompromising uprightness, he naturally drew to himself the confidence of his associates, as to one whose lead it would be safe to follow. He was a man of deeds rather than of words; and yet, when the occasion called for it, he could give utterance to his views in language that needed no interpreter, or he could put them into proper written form.

His organizing capacity was very marked. He took a prominent part in bringing into associated and orderly form the scattered and diverse populations of Braintree, Rehoboth and Stonington ; and his versatility was wonderful. On all occasions we find him possessed of large resources, and capable of turning his hand without difficulty to almost any business or branch of employment that offered itself. He could frame a building or sit as a judge in a case at law. He could forge a chain, or draw up a plan for the organization of a municipal government. He could survey a tract of land, or worthily represent a town in the General Court.

One fact which marks him as a man who commanded great respect, is that after gathering around him such men of superior ability as Thomas Stanton, Walter Palmer and Captain George Denison, they worked so harmoniously with him in the organization and ordering of the new community.

And further, it needs only to be added, that he was a man of decided Christian principle, and that wherever he planted himself he was an earnest supporter of religious worship, and religious institutions. When he emigrated to America he brought his religion with him, and both he and his wife were enrolled among the first members of the church in Boston, Massachusetts, and on his removal to Braintree and Rehoboth, he took his church relations with him ; and although he died prior to the organization of the First Church in Stonington, the tradition is that prior to the establishment of religious worship in his neighborhood, he was accustomed, in all suitable weather, to attend Sunday services at Pequot, starting a little after midnight that he might in good time accomplish the fifteen miles of travel over rough roads and the crossing of two rivers. There can be no doubt that he took an active part in the measures which were initiated in 1657 for establishing regular religious services within the limits of the plantation, and which issued, after the employment of several preachers for short seasons, in an invitation to Rev. James Noyes to serve the people as their permanent pastor. Mr. Noyes entered upon his labors here in 1664, about three years before Mr. Chesebrough's death; but he was not ordained, nor was the church organized until 1674. In his last Will and Testament, Mr. Chesebrough speaks of Rev. James Noyes and Mr. Amos Richardson, as "my truly and well-beloved friends," -- thus showing that one of the persons to whom he was strongly attached was a Christian minister.1
Birth*1594William Chesebrough was born in 1594 in England.2
Marriage*15 December 1620He married Anne Stevenson, daughter of Peter Stevenson, by license on 15 December 1620 by "the blessed John Cotton" at St. Botolph's Church, Boston, Lincolnshire, England.3
Children* They had twelve children together. Only three, however, lived to be married: Samuel, Nathaniel and Elisha.2

Family

Anne Stevenson
Children1.Marie Chesebrough4 b. 2 May 1622
2.Martha Chesebrough4 b. 18 Sep 1623
3.David Chesebrough4 b. 9 Sep 1624
4.Jonathan Chesebrough4 b. 9 Sep 1624, d. 1630
5.Samuel Chesebrough+4 b. 1 Apr 1627
6.Andronicus Chesebrough4 b. 6 Feb 1629
7.Junia Chesebrough4 b. 6 Feb 1629
8.Nathaniel Chesebrough+4 b. 25 Jan 1630, d. 22 Nov 1678
9.John Chesebrough4 b. 2 Sep 1632, d. 1650
10.Jabez Chesebrough4 b. 3 May 1635
11.Elisha Chesebrough4 b. 4 Jun 1637, d. 1 Sep 1670
12.Joseph Chesebrough4 b. 18 Jul 1640

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), from the biographical sketch of William Chesebrough written by Reverend Amos S. Chesebrough, D.D., New Hartford, Connecticut, March 5, 1901. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, biographical sketch of William Chesebrough, pages 7-15 and page 17.
  3. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, page 17, referencing the Parish Register of St. Botolph's Church.
  4. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, page 17.

William Chesebrough1

b. 8 April 1662, d. 2 January 1739/40
RelationshipGreat-granduncle of John Bolton
Father*Samuel Chesebrough1 b. 1 Apr 1627
Mother*Abigail ______1
Birth*8 April 1662William Chesebrough was born on 8 April 1662.1
(Children) Baptism of Family23 June 1672 On 23 June 1672 the following the children of Samuel and Abigail (__?__) Chesebrough were baptized by Simon Bradstreet at the First Church of New London, New London, New London County, Connecticut: Abigail Chesebrough, Samuel Chesebrough, William Chesebrough, Sarah Chesebrough, Elisha Chesebrough and Elizabeth Chesebrough. The notation in the source indicates the family had moved from Rehoboth, Massachusetts.2
Death*2 January 1739/40He died on 2 January 1739/40 at age 77.1

Citations

  1. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts (New York, New York: Press of T.A. Wright, 1903), Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts.
  2. [S471] Anna Chesebrough Wildey, Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Part I, Descendants of Samuel, pages 18-301; the source references the records of the First Church of New London, Connecticut, with the notation "Rehoboth" (quotes included).

Anna Chickering1,2,3,4

b. circa 1635, d. 1 January 1687/88
Father*Francis Chickering5 d. 10 Oct 1658
Mother*Anne Fiske5 b. 1 Apr 1610, d. 5 Dec 1649
Birth*circa 1635Anna Chickering was born circa 1635 in England.6
Marriage*3 November 1652She married Stephen Paine on 3 November 1652 in Dedham, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England).3,4,7
(Wife) Burial24 January 1678Anna became a widow when Stephen Paine died. He was buried on 24 January 1678 in Rehoboth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts (Plymouth Colony).6
Marriage*2 December 1679She married second, as his second wife, Thomas Metcalf, son of Michael Metcalf and Sarah Elwyn, on 2 December 1679 in Rehoboth, Massachusetts (Plymouth Colony).4,3,1
Death*1 January 1687/88She died on 1 January 1687/88 in Dedham.6,2

Family 1

Stephen Paine b. 1629
Child1.Sarah Paine+6 b. 12 Oct 1666

Family 2

Thomas Metcalf b. 27 Dec 1629, d. 16 Nov 1702

Citations

  1. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Rehoboth, Volume 1, page 904, his surname transcribed as "Medselfe" and her name "Anna". Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  2. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Dedham, Volumes 1 and 2, page 21, her name "Anna."
  3. [S1358] Sidney L. Paine, "The English Ancestry of Stephen Paine of Rehoboth, Plymouth Colony", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 143, pages 291-302 (October 1989): her name noted as "Ann". Hereinafter cited as "Ancestry of Stephen Paine of Rehoboth."
  4. [S1359] Dr. Luther Metcalf Harris, "Metcalf Genealogy", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 6, pages 171-178 (April 1852): her name noted as "Anne". Hereinafter cited as "Metcalf Genealogy (NEHGR April 1852)."
  5. [S1360] George Walter Chamberlain, "The English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 69, pages 226-229 (July 1915). Hereinafter cited as "English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England."
  6. [S1358] Sidney L. Paine, "Ancestry of Stephen Paine of Rehoboth."
  7. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Dedham, Volumes 1 and 2, page 126, her name "An."

Francis Chickering1

d. 10 October 1658
Father*Henry Chickering1 b. c 1560, d. b 7 Jul 1627
Mother*Mary ______1
Relationship Note*It is unlikely that Annis, the wife of John Morse of Dedham, and Francis Chickering of Dedham, were siblings. In his Morse-Chickering Correction article, the author acknowledged that the information he had relied upon had come from two secondary sources and that further research had convinced him that "it is most doubtful if Annas, wife of John Morse, was a Chickering."2,3
Birth*Francis Chickering was born in Norfolk County, England.1
Marriage*He married first Amy or Anne Fiske, daughter of John Fiske and Anne Lawter, in England. The Chickering Ancestry source was uncertain whether her name was Amy or Ann.4
(Husband) Death5 December 1649Francis became a widower when Anne (Fiske) Chickering died on 5 December 1649.5,6
Marriage*11 June 1650He married second Sarah Sibble on 11 June 1650 in Dedham.1,7
Death*10 October 1658He died on 10 October 1658 in Dedham, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England).1,8

Family 1

Anne Fiske b. 1 Apr 1610, d. 5 Dec 1649
Child1.Anna Chickering+1 b. c 1635, d. 1 Jan 1687/88

Family 2

Sarah Sibble

Citations

  1. [S1360] George Walter Chamberlain, "The English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 69, pages 226-229 (July 1915). Hereinafter cited as "English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England."
  2. [S504] Compiled by J. Howard Morse and Emily W. Leavitt, Morse Genealogy : comprising the descendants of Samuel, Anthony, William and Joseph Morse and John Moss : being a revision of the "Memorial of the Morses" published by Rev. Abner Morse in 1850, downloaded from the Family History Library at www.familysearch.org. Samuel Morse (1587-1654) immigrated to Watertown, Massachusetts in 1635. Anthony Morse (1618-1686) and his brother, William Morse (1614-1683), immigrated to Newbury, Massachusetts. Joseph Morse (d.1646) immigrated to Ipswich, Massachusetts. John Moss (1603 or 4-1707) immigrated to New Haven, Connecticut. All emigrated from England. Includes indexes. (Cloverdale, Oregon: Morse Society, 1982), Samuel Morse, Second Generation, pages 5-11, probably incorrectly reporting her surname was "Chickering". Hereinafter cited as Morse Genealogy : comprising the descendants of Samuel, Anthony, William and Joseph Morse and John Moss.
  3. [S1364] G. Andrews Moriarty, "Morse-Chickering Correction", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 100, page 79 (1946): the author correcting his earlier statement that John Morse of Dedham married Annas, a sister of Francis Chickering of Dedham. He acknowledged that the information had come from two secondary sources and that further research convinced him that "it is most doubtful if Annas, wife of John Morse, was a Chickering". Hereinafter cited as "Morse-Chickering Correction."
  4. [S1360] George Walter Chamberlain, "English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England", questioning whether her name was Amy or Ann.
  5. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Dedham, Volumes 1 and 2, page 128, her name recorded as "An" and the date written as "the 5 of the 10 mo" which, under the Gregorian calendar of that period, was December, not October. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  6. [S1361] Compiled by Nathan Grier Parke II and edited by Donald Lines Jacobus, The Ancestry of Lorenzo Ackley & his wife Emma Arabella Bosworth, downloaded from the Family History Library at www.familysearch.org. (Woodstock, Vermont: N. Grier Parke II, 1960), Richard Fiske, page 115. Hereinafter cited as Ancestry of Lorenzo Ackley.
  7. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Dedham, Volumes 1 and 2, page 126, the date written as "11 of the 4 mo" which, under the Gregorian calendar of that period, was June, not April.
  8. [S1361] Nathan Grier Parke II and edited by Donald Lines Jacobus, Ancestry of Lorenzo Ackley, Francis Chickering, pages 113-114.

Henry Chickering1

b. circa 1560, d. before 7 July 1627
Birth*circa 1560Henry Chickering was probably born circa 1560 in England.1
Marriage*He married Mary ______ in England.1
Residence*between 1588 and 1595Mary and Henry Chickering lived in Bramfield, Suffolk County, England, between 1588 and 1595, and perhaps for a longer period of time.1
Occupation*He was a yeoman.1
Will*11 July 1626Henry wrote his will dated 11 July 1626 in Ringsfield, Suffolk County,1
Death*before 7 July 1627 and died before 7 July 1627 when his will was proved.1

Family

Mary ______
Children1.Henry Chickering1 b. 5 Jan 1588/89, d. 21 Jul 1671
2.Francis Chickering+1 d. 10 Oct 1658
3.Simon Chickering+1 d. b 22 Aug 1674

Citations

  1. [S1360] George Walter Chamberlain, "The English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 69, pages 226-229 (July 1915). Hereinafter cited as "English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England."

Henry Chickering1

b. 5 January 1588/89, d. 21 July 1671
Father*Henry Chickering1 b. c 1560, d. b 7 Jul 1627
Mother*Mary ______1
Baptism*5 January 1588/89Henry Chickering was baptized on 5 January 1588/89 at Bramfield, Suffolk County, England.1
Death*21 July 1671He died on 21 July 1671 in Dedham, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England), at age 82.1

Citations

  1. [S1360] George Walter Chamberlain, "The English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 69, pages 226-229 (July 1915). Hereinafter cited as "English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England."

Mary Chickering1

b. 15 October 1680
Father*Nathaniel Chickering1 b. 8 Oct 1647, d. 27 Oct 1694
Mother*Lydia Fisher1 b. 14 Jul 1652, d. 17 Jul 1737
Birth*15 October 1680Mary Chickering was born on 15 October 1680 in Dedham, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England).1
Marriage*19 April 1715She married, as his second wife, Nathan Aldis, son of John Aldis and Mary ______, on 19 April 1715 in Dedham.1

Family

Nathan Aldis b. 11 May 1685, d. 10 Feb 1749/50

Citations

  1. [S1355] Frederick H. Whitin, The Aldis Family of Dedham, Wrentham, Roxbury and Franklin, Massachusetts, 1640-1800, downloaded from the Boston Public Library EBooks and Texts Archive at www.archive.org. Reprint from Dedham Historical Register, Volume XIV. (Dedham, Massachusetts: Dedham Transcript Press, 1905), Nathan Aldis, pages 13-14. Hereinafter cited as The Aldis Family, Massachusetts,1640-1800.

Nathaniel Chickering1

b. 8 October 1647, d. 27 October 1694
Father*Simon Chickering2 d. b 22 Aug 1674
Mother*Prudence ______2
Birth*8 October 1647Nathaniel Chickering was born on 8 October 1647 in Wrentham, Suffolk County, England.2,1
Marriage*30 December 1668He married first Mary Judson on 30 December 1668 in Dedham, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England).3,4
(Husband) Death27 January 1668/69Nathaniel became a widower when Mary (Judson) Chickering died on 27 January 1668/69, just one month after their marriage.3,4
Marriage*3 December 1674He married second Lydia Fisher, daughter of Daniel Fisher and Abigail Marriott, on 3 December 1674 in Dedham, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England).1,3,5,6
Death*27 October 1694He died on 27 October 1694 in Dedham at age 47.1

Family 1

Mary Judson d. 27 Jan 1668/69

Family 2

Lydia Fisher b. 14 Jul 1652, d. 17 Jul 1737
Child1.Mary Chickering6 b. 15 Oct 1680

Citations

  1. [S1255] Philip A. Fisher, The Fisher Genealogy : record of the descendants of Joshua, Anthony and Cornelius Fisher, of Dedham, Mass., 1636-1640, downloaded from Google Books at www.google.com. (Everett, Massachusetts: Massachusetts Publishing Company, 1898), pages 38-39. Hereinafter cited as The Fisher Genealogy.
  2. [S1360] George Walter Chamberlain, "The English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 69, pages 226-229 (July 1915). Hereinafter cited as "English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England."
  3. [S413] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages: Prior to 1700 (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1985 and 1992), page 150. Hereinafter cited as New England Marriages: Prior to 1700.
  4. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Dedham, Volumes 1 and 2, page 11. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  5. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Dedham, Volumes 1 and 2, page 13, the date written as "3 of ye 10 mo" which, under the Gregorian calendar of that period, was December, not October.
  6. [S1355] Frederick H. Whitin, The Aldis Family of Dedham, Wrentham, Roxbury and Franklin, Massachusetts, 1640-1800, downloaded from the Boston Public Library EBooks and Texts Archive at www.archive.org. Reprint from Dedham Historical Register, Volume XIV. (Dedham, Massachusetts: Dedham Transcript Press, 1905), Nathan Aldis, pages 13-14. Hereinafter cited as The Aldis Family, Massachusetts,1640-1800.

Simon Chickering1

d. before 22 August 1674
Father*Henry Chickering1 b. c 1560, d. b 7 Jul 1627
Mother*Mary ______1
Birth*Simon Chickering was born in Suffolk County, England.1
Marriage*He married first Thomazine ______ in England.1
(Husband) Burial5 August 1641Simon became a widower when Thomazine (__?__) Chickering died. She was buried as "Goody Chickry" on 5 August 1641 in Wrentham, Suffolk County, England.1
Marriage*circa 1642He married second Prudence ______ circa 1642 in England.1
Will*8 July 1674Simon wrote his will dated 8 July 1674 in Wrentham, Suffolk County,1
Death*before 22 August 1674 and died before 22 August 1674 when his will was proved.1

Family 1

Thomazine ______

Family 2

Prudence ______
Child1.Nathaniel Chickering+1 b. 8 Oct 1647, d. 27 Oct 1694

Citations

  1. [S1360] George Walter Chamberlain, "The English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 69, pages 226-229 (July 1915). Hereinafter cited as "English Ancestry of the Chickerings of New England."

Oliver L. Child1

Marriage*9 February 1809He married Polly Brown, daughter of Lemuel Brown and Sarah Draper, on 9 February 1809.1

Family

Polly Brown b. 10 May 1786

Citations

  1. [S1002] Records copied by Mrs. L.A. Child from a Bible printed by Kimber and Sharpless of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and, in 1935, in the possession of Miss Ella E. Emerson of Stoneham, Massachusetts. "Notes: Child Bible Records", New England Historical & Genealogical Register. Volume 89, pages 386-387 (1935). Hereinafter cited as "Child Bible Records."

Joseph Chillson1

d. 9 February 1778
Marriage*15 November 1747He married Lydia Pratt, daughter of Joseph Pratt and Lydia Hawes, on 15 November 1747 in Bellingham, Suffolk County.1,2
Death*9 February 1778He died on 9 February 1778 in Bellingham.3

Family

Lydia Pratt b. 17 Oct 1722, d. 29 Mar 1789

Citations

  1. [S1240] Raymond Gordon Hawes, The Edward Hawes Heirs : Edward Hawes, ca. 1616-1687, of Dedham, Massachusetts, and his wife, Eliony Lumber : and some of their descendants through eleven generations. Edward Hawes (ca. 1616-1687) was living at Dedham, Massachusetts, by 1648, where he married Eliony Lumber (ca. 1625-1688/9) that year. They had nine children, 1648/9-1666, all born at Dedham. Descendants lived in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, Maine, Vermont, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and elsewhere. Descendants also spell their surname Haws. (Baltimore, Maryland: Gateway Press, 1996), Generation Three, pages 15-27. Hereinafter cited as The Edward Hawes Heirs.
  2. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Bellingham Marriages, Volume 1, page 95. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  3. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Bellingham Deaths, Volume 1, page 174.

Isabella Chilton1

b. 15 January 1586/87
Father*James Chilton1,2 b. b 1556, d. 18 Dec 1620
Mother*Susannah Furner2 d. a 11 Jan 1620/21
Baptism*15 January 1586/87Isabella Chilton was baptized on 15 January 1586/87 at St. Paul's Parish, Canterbury, Kent County, England.1
Marriage*21 July 1615She married Roger Chandler from Colchester, England on 21 July 1615 in Leyden, South Holland Province, Holland.1

Family

Roger Chandler d. bt 1658 - 3 Oct 1665
Children1.Mary Chandler1 b. a 1622
2.Martha Chandler1 b. a 1622
3.Sarah Chandler+1 b. b 15 Oct 1622, d. b 27 Oct 1675
4.Samuel Chandler1 b. b 15 Oct 1622

Citations

  1. [S896] Revised by Robert S. Wakefield, Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Volume 15, James Chilton and Richard More. Note: Volume 2, Parts I and II (1975), Chilton and More, were revised and replaced in 1997 by this Volume 15, Chilton and More. (Plymouth, Massachusetts: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1997), Person# 2, Isabella Chilton, page 5. Hereinafter cited as James Chilton and Richard More of the Mayflower (Five).
  2. [S896] Revised by Robert S. Wakefield, James Chilton and Richard More of the Mayflower (Five), Person# 1, James Chilton, page 3.

James Chilton

b. before 1556, d. 18 December 1620
Father*Lyonell Chylton1
Birth*before 1556James Chilton was probably born before 1556, if his age in 1619 was actually 63, in Canterbury, Kent County, England.1
Marriage*before 1587He married Susannah Furner, daughter of ______ Furner and Isabel (__?__) Furner, before 1587.1,2
(Adult Male) Mayflower Passenger9 November 1620James Chilton was about 64 years old, and likely the oldest passenger, when he sailed with his wife Susannah and daughter Mary onboard the Mayflower from Plymouth, England to Plymouth Colony in what is now Massachusetts. His daughter Mary has traditionally been given the honor of being the first female to step ashore at Plymouth Rock, however no historical documentation for this tradition has ever been found. When the Mayflower departed Plymouth, England on 6 Sep 1620, she was carrying 102 passengers, including three pregnant women. During the voyage one baby, Oceanus Hopkins, was born making a total of 103 passengers. Three days before land was sighted, passenger William Button died, so when the Mayflower arrived there were again 102 passengers. A full list of the passengers may be accessed by clicking on the PDF icon at the end of this section and those included in this project so far include adult males John Alden, Francis Cooke and James Chilton, adult females Susanna (Furner) Chilton, young male John Cooke, and young females Priscilla Mullins and Mary Chilton.

During the weeks ahead, while everyone still "lived" on the ship, the men explored the area looking for a place to build their settlement. Another baby, Peregrine (meaning "wanderer") White, son of William and Susannah, was born in America onboard the Mayflower on 20 Nov, the first English child born to the Pilgrims in the New World. The White's servant, Edward Thompson, died on 4 Dec, followed shortly by 7 year old Jasper More, one of the four illegitimate children placed on the Mayflower in the care of the William Brewster family by their mother's humiliated husband. Two of the other More children died as well. And, tragically, Dorothy May Bradford, William Bradford's wife, slipped over the side of the anchored Mayflower and drowned. In early December the group decided to move the ship and look somewhere else for a settlement location. The ship and its passengers left Provincetown Harbor on 15 Dec. Two days later on 17 Dec, the Mayflower dropped anchor at Plymouth Harbor and on 21 Dec the first landing party arrived at the site of what would become the settlement of Plymouth. The weather, however, was so terrible they could not begin work on shore for several days. In the meantime, the Mayflower had become a hospital ship, the passengers suffering from colds, coughs, fevers and scurvy. James Chilton had died even before the Mayflower arrived in Plymouth Harbor. Richard Britteridge passed away the day the ship arrived, and two days later Solomon Prower, the stepson of Christopher Martin, the ship's designated "governor", died. The following day Mary Allerton gave birth to a stillborn son.

By the end of January 1621, enough of the settlement had been built to begin unloading provisions from the Mayflower, however the emigrants' ordeal was far from over. With two and sometimes three people dying a day during February and March, almost everyone had lost a loved one. Christopher Martin died in early January, his wife Mary soon after. The Rigsdale, Tinker and Turner families were completely wiped out, followed by Susannah Chilton whose husband James had died while the ship was at Provincetown Harbor. The Chilton's 13 year old daughter Mary had become an orphan. Also orphaned that first winter were 17 year old Joseph Rogers, 12 year old Samuel Fuller, 18 year old John Crackston, 17 year old Priscilla Mullins and 13 year old Elizabeth Tilley, who also lost her aunt and uncle, Edward and Ann Tilley. By mid-March, William Bradford, Myles Standish, Francis Eaton and Isaac Allerton, who had three children between the ages of eight and four, had all become widowers. When William White died, his widow Susannah was left with their newborn son Peregrine and 5 year old Resolved. Susannah was the plantation's only surviving widow. By that first spring, 52 of the 102 who had originally arrived at Provincetown were dead. Half, however, survived. And, miraculously, the families of William Brewster, Francis Cooke, Stephen Hopkins and John Billington were completely untouched by all the disease. The remaining "Pilgrims" worked, prayed and fought together and their settlement of Plimouth Plantation in Plymouth Colony had begun.3,4,5
(Signer) Mayflower Compact11 November 1620James Chilton was one of the 41 adult males who signed the Mayflower Compact on 11 November 1620 onboard the Mayflower which was at anchor in what is now Provincetown Harbor, Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts (Plymouth Colony). All 41 of the adult male members on the Mayflower signed the Compact. It outlined the first written laws for the new land, determined authority within the settlement and was observed as "the law" until 1691. The Compact established that the colony of mostly persecuted Separatists was to be free of English law. It was devised to set up a government from within themselves and was written by those to be governed. When creating the Mayflower Compact, the signers believed that covenants were not only to be honored between God and man, but also between each other. They had always honored covenants as part of their righteous integrity and agreed to be bound by this same principle with the Compact. John Adams and many historians have referred to the Mayflower Compact as the foundation of the U.S. Constitution written more than 150 later.3,6,7
Death*18 December 1620He died aboard the Mayflower in Cape Cod Harbor on 18 December 1620.1
(Father) OrphanWhen James and Susanna (Furner) Chilton both died during their first winter in America, their 13-year-old daughter Mary Chilton was left orphaned in her new world.2,1

Family

Susannah Furner d. a 11 Jan 1620/21
Children1.Isabella Chilton+8,1 b. 15 Jan 1586/87
2.Mary Chilton+2 b. 31 May 1607, d. b 1 May 1679

Citations

  1. [S896] Revised by Robert S. Wakefield, Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Volume 15, James Chilton and Richard More. Note: Volume 2, Parts I and II (1975), Chilton and More, were revised and replaced in 1997 by this Volume 15, Chilton and More. (Plymouth, Massachusetts: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1997), Person# 1, James Chilton, page 3. Hereinafter cited as James Chilton and Richard More of the Mayflower (Five).
  2. [S474] Nahum Mitchell, History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, including an extensive Family Register. Note: page numbers differ slightly between publications used in our research, including FHL copy, Google Books, Boston Public Library EBooks online and our personal library reprint published by Heritage Books. (Baltimore, Maryland: Gateway Press, Inc., original publication date was 1840; reprinted for the third and fourth times in 1970 and 1975; first reprinted in 1897 by Henry T. Pratt, Bridgewater, Massachusetts; originally printed in 1840 by Kidder and Wright, Boston, Massachusetts), Winslow, pages 409-412. Hereinafter cited as History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater.
  3. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.
  4. [S911] Nathaniel Philbrick, Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War (New York, New York: Penguin Group, Inc., 2006), Chapter 5, The Heart of Winter, pages 78-92. Hereinafter cited as Mayflower: A Story.
  5. [S911] Nathaniel Philbrick, Mayflower: A Story, Chapter 4, Beaten with Their Own Rod, pages 56-77.
  6. [S841] Mayflower History.com, online at www.mayflowerhistory.com. Hereinafter cited as MayflowerHistory.com.
  7. [S912] All About History, online at www.allabouthistory.org. Hereinafter cited as All About History.
  8. [S896] Revised by Robert S. Wakefield, James Chilton and Richard More of the Mayflower (Five), Person# 2, Isabella Chilton, page 5.