Gaynor Barry1

Deed Memorial*13 January 1773A memorial deed dated 13 January 1773 made between Gaynor Barry of the city of Dublin Esq. of the one part and William Gerrard of Dormstown in the county of Meath, gentleman, of the other part.

Whereby, in consideration of £1,979, 19s, 2p sterling to the said Gaynor Barry in hand paid by the said William Gerrard, the said Gaynor Barry did demise, grant, set to farm and let unto the said William Gerrard all that part of the town and lands at Dormstown in as full a manner as then in the possession of the said William Gerrard, containing 86 acres, 2 roods and 26 perches, be the same more or less, situate in the county of Meath with all the rights, members and appurtenances thereunto belonging.

To hold unto the said William Gerrard, his heirs and assigns, from the first day of November last for and during the lives and life of the said Gaynor Barry, of Henry Codington of the city of Dublin Esq., now clerk to the Honorable Justice Dennison, and of Dixie Codington, eldest son of Dixie Codington, late of Athlumney, Esq. and the survivors and survivor of them at the yearly rent of £80 to be paid half yearly in which said deed of lease is contained a covenant that the said Gaynor Barry, his heirs and assigns, should from time to time, forever thereafter, at the request of the said William Gerrard, his heirs and assigns, as often as any of the said lives in said lease named, or any of the lives to be named, in all or every of the renewals thereof, should happen to die and, upon payment or tender of all the rent that should be then in arrears, and upon tender of one peppercorn by way of fine, renew or make a new lease of the premises aforesaid to the said William Gerrard, his heirs and assigns for the two lives then in being and for the life nominated as aforesaid at the like rent clause for renewal and other covenants contained in the lease.

The deed of lease was executed, signed and sealed by William Gerrard and Gaynor Barry and witnessed by Stewart Mulligan, clerk to Mr. Edward King of the city of Dublin, attorney, and Richard Tegart, clerk to the said Gaynor Barry on 15 January 1773. It was registered the same day.1

Citations

  1. [S588] Ireland Registry of Deeds, Transcripts of memorials of deeds, conveyances and wills, 1708-1929; on 2687 FHL microfilms. Most are now digitized and available online at www.familysearch.org, LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah: 1773; Film# 531669, Volume 296, pages 77-78, deed number 194325, images 47-48. Hereinafter cited as Deeds, conveyances and wills, 1708-1929.

James Barry1

Residence*He lived in Newtonbarry, County Wexford, which is now, since 1950, called Bunclody.1

Family

Child1.Judith Barry+1

Citations

  1. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Maxwell,_1st_Baron_Farnham. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.

Judith Barry1

Father*James Barry1
Marriage*1719She married John Maxwell in 1719.1

Family

John Maxwell b. 1687, d. 6 Aug 1759
Children1.Robert Maxwell1 b. c 1720, d. 16 Nov 1779
2.Barry Maxwell1 d. 7 Oct 1800
3.Henry Maxwell+1 d. 7 Oct 1798

Citations

  1. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Maxwell,_1st_Baron_Farnham. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.

______ Bartholomew1

Marriage*______ Bartholomew of Boston married Eliza Hayward, daughter of Josiah Hayward and Mary Dunham.1,2

Family

Eliza Hayward

Citations

  1. [S474] Nahum Mitchell, History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, including an extensive Family Register. Note: page numbers differ slightly between publications used in our research, including FHL copy, Google Books, Boston Public Library EBooks online and our personal library reprint published by Heritage Books. (Baltimore, Maryland: Gateway Press, Inc., original publication date was 1840; reprinted for the third and fourth times in 1970 and 1975; first reprinted in 1897 by Henry T. Pratt, Bridgewater, Massachusetts; originally printed in 1840 by Kidder and Wright, Boston, Massachusetts), Hayward, pages 181-190. Hereinafter cited as History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater.
  2. [S612] Paul Dillon Hayward, Thomas Hayward of Bridgewater (Denver, Colorado: P.D. Hayward, 1985), Author stated in his Preface that this book is his third compilation on the Haywards and that most of the data he obtained from previously published sources. He warned that there are undoubtedly many errors, some of which may invalidate entire sections, page 2. Hereinafter cited as Thomas Hayward of Bridgewater.

Dorothy Bartlett1

Marriage*15 December 1737She married Cutting Moody on 15 December 1737 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1,2

Family

Cutting Moody
Child1.Sarah Moody1,2 b. 26 Apr 1739, d. 25 Jul 1792

Citations

  1. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Newbury Births, page 333. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  2. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Newbury Marriages, page 334.

Ebenezer Bartlett1

b. circa 1694, d. 24 October 1781
Birth*circa 1694Ebenezer Bartlett was born circa 1694 probably in Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1
Marriage*3 July 1718He married Mary Rider on 3 July 1718 in Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1
(Husband) Deathbefore 8 October 1730Ebenezer became a widower when Mary (Rider) Bartlett died on before 8 October 1730.1
Death*24 October 1781He died on 24 October 1781 in Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts (Continental Congress).1

Family

Mary Rider b. 10 Oct 1694, d. b 8 Oct 1730
Child1.Lydia Bartlett+1 b. 17 Aug 1721, d. b 5 Jul 1819

Citations

  1. [S278] Multiple editors and compilers, Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Descendants of the Pilgrims Who Landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, December 1620, volumes 1-23 (Plymouth, Massachusetts: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1975), Volume 18, Part II: Richard Warren, Family number 251, page 14. Hereinafter cited as Mayflower Families through Five Generations.

Jane Bartlett1

d. 6 September 1659
Marriage*16 January 1654/55Jane Bartlett married William Bolton on 16 January 1654/55 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England).1,2,3
Death*6 September 1659She died on 6 September 1659 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England).1,2

Family

William Bolton d. 27 Mar 1697
Child1.Mary Bolton2 b. 25 Sep 1655, d. 6 Dec 1656

Citations

  1. [S490] Charles Knowles Bolton, The Boltons of Old and New England: with a genealogy of the descendants of William Bolton of Reading, Massachusetts, 1720 (Albany, New York: Joel Munsell's Sons, 1889), page xi. Hereinafter cited as Boltons of Old and New England.
  2. [S48] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850. CD-ROM (101 Newbury, Boston, Massachusetts: NEHGS), Births - Marriages - Deaths. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850.
  3. [S413] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages: Prior to 1700 (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1985 and 1992), page 81. Hereinafter cited as New England Marriages: Prior to 1700.

Lydia Bartlett1

b. 17 August 1721, d. before 5 July 1819
Father*Ebenezer Bartlett2 b. c 1694, d. 24 Oct 1781
Mother*Mary Rider2 b. 10 Oct 1694, d. b 8 Oct 1730
Birth*17 August 1721Lydia Bartlett was born on 17 August 1721 in Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1
Marriage*9 July 1741She married Lemuel Delano, son of Benoni Delano and Elizabeth Drew, on 9 July 1741 in Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1
Death*before 5 July 1819She died before 5 July 1819.1

Family

Lemuel Delano b. 6 Nov 1712, d. 6 Sep 1778
Child1.Esther Delano+1 b. 15 Nov 1745, d. 23 Apr 1818

Citations

  1. [S424] Muriel Curtis Cushing, Philip Delano of the "Fortune" 1621 and his Descendants for Four Generations (Plymouth, Massachusetts: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2002), Family number 76, pages 66-67. Hereinafter cited as Philip Delano of the "Fortune" 1621 Four Generations.
  2. [S278] Multiple editors and compilers, Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Descendants of the Pilgrims Who Landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, December 1620, volumes 1-23 (Plymouth, Massachusetts: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1975), Volume 18, Part II: Richard Warren, Family number 251, page 14. Hereinafter cited as Mayflower Families through Five Generations.

Mercy Bartlett1

b. 10 March 1650/51
Birth*10 March 1650/51Mercy Bartlett was born on 10 March 1650/51 in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts (Plymouth Colony).1
Marriage*25 December 1668She married John Joy, who may have been the son of Thomas Joy and Joan Gallop, on 25 December 1668 in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts (Plymouth Colony). The Mayflower source noted that previously published Plymouth Colony Records and Mayflower publications stated that Mercy married John "Ivey" and that a closer reading of the original record revealed that Mercy married John "Joy."1

Family

John Joy b. 10 Oct 1641, d. b 8 Jul 1677
Child1.John Joy1 b. 30 Sep 1672

Citations

  1. [S842] Robert S. Wakefield, Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Volume 18, Family of Richard Warren. Third Edition, in 3 Parts. (Plymouth, Massachusetts: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2004), Part I, Person# 16, Mercy Bartlett, page 19. Hereinafter cited as Mayflower 18: Family of Richard Warren.

Relief Bartlett1

b. 10 March 1740
Father*Wright Bartlett1
Mother*Bethia Packard1,2
Birth*10 March 1740Relief Bartlett was born on 10 March 1740 in Bridgewater, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).3
Marriage*25 August 1761She married first Ebezener Hooper, son of Nathaniel Hooper and Elizabeth Tinkham, on 25 August 1761 in Bridgewater, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1,4
(Wife) Death31 December 1782Relief (Bartlett) became a widow when Ebezener Hooper died on 31 December 1782.5
Marriage*4 September 1788She married second Joseph Howard of Raynham on 4 September 1788.1

Family 1

Ebezener Hooper b. Jun 1740, d. 31 Dec 1782

Family 2

Joseph Howard

Citations

  1. [S610] Charles Henry Pope and Thomas Hooper, compilers, downloaded from Google Books, Hooper Genealogy (Boston, Massachusetts: Charles H. Pope, 1908), Part I, The Reading Family, compiled by Thomas Hooper of Boston, Fourth Generation, pages 19-32. Hereinafter cited as Hooper Genealogy.
  2. [S474] Nahum Mitchell, History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, including an extensive Family Register. Note: page numbers differ slightly between publications used in our research, including FHL copy, Google Books, Boston Public Library EBooks online and our personal library reprint published by Heritage Books. (Baltimore, Maryland: Gateway Press, Inc., original publication date was 1840; reprinted for the third and fourth times in 1970 and 1975; first reprinted in 1897 by Henry T. Pratt, Bridgewater, Massachusetts; originally printed in 1840 by Kidder and Wright, Boston, Massachusetts), Packard, pages 264-276. Hereinafter cited as History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater.
  3. [S836] New England Historic Genealogical Society, compiler, downloaded from Google Books, Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts to the Year 1850. In two Volumes: Volume I. Births and Volume II. Marriages and Deaths. (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1916), Births, Volume I, page 41, her name spelled "Releaf Bartlet". Hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts to 1850.
  4. [S836] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts to 1850, Marriages, Volume II, page 41.
  5. [S836] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts to 1850, Deaths, Volume II, page 493.

Wright Bartlett1

Marriage*29 July 1731He married Bethia Packard, daughter of Samuel Packard and Elizabeth Edson, on 29 July 1731 in Bridgewater, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1,2,3,4

Family

Bethia Packard
Child1.Relief Bartlett1 b. 10 Mar 1740

Citations

  1. [S610] Charles Henry Pope and Thomas Hooper, compilers, downloaded from Google Books, Hooper Genealogy (Boston, Massachusetts: Charles H. Pope, 1908), Part I, The Reading Family, compiled by Thomas Hooper of Boston, Fourth Generation, pages 19-32. Hereinafter cited as Hooper Genealogy.
  2. [S474] Nahum Mitchell, History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, including an extensive Family Register. Note: page numbers differ slightly between publications used in our research, including FHL copy, Google Books, Boston Public Library EBooks online and our personal library reprint published by Heritage Books. (Baltimore, Maryland: Gateway Press, Inc., original publication date was 1840; reprinted for the third and fourth times in 1970 and 1975; first reprinted in 1897 by Henry T. Pratt, Bridgewater, Massachusetts; originally printed in 1840 by Kidder and Wright, Boston, Massachusetts), Packard, pages 264-276. Hereinafter cited as History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater.
  3. [S474] Nahum Mitchell, History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater, Bartlett, page 109.
  4. [S836] New England Historic Genealogical Society, compiler, downloaded from Google Books, Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts to the Year 1850. In two Volumes: Volume I. Births and Volume II. Marriages and Deaths. (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1916), Marriages, Volume II, page 41. Hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts to 1850.

James Barton1

Marriage*He married Mary Smithson.1

Family

Mary Smithson
Child1.Mary Barton+1 b. 1 Jan 1788, d. 29 Mar 1867

Citations

  1. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, in two volumes, with indexes in Volume II. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, the information in these volumes often proves to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. (Tempe, Arizona: published for the author by Graphics of Tempe, 1999), Volume II, Chapter 20, pages 768-769. Hereinafter cited as Heaton Families II.

Mary Barton1

b. 1 January 1788, d. 29 March 1867
ChartsDescendants of Robert Heaton of Yorkshire, The Immigrant
Father*James Barton1
Mother*Mary Smithson1
Birth*1 January 1788Mary Barton was born on 1 January 1788.1
Marriage*18 June 1809She married, as his second wife, William Heaton, son of Jeremiah Heaton and Elizabeth Carter, on 18 June 1809.1
Relocation*1827Mary's husband sold his farm in the township of Fawn, York County in 1827 and moved his family west as Mary's brothers had already done. When they settled in Meigs County, Ohio, they were disappointed in the land, but remained there as farmers for the rest of their lives.1
(Wife) Deathbetween 1842 and 1843Mary became a widow when William Heaton died between 1842 and 1843.2,3
Death*29 March 1867She died on 29 March 1867 in Meigs County, Ohio, at age 79.1

Family

William Heaton b. 1764, d. bt 1842 - 1843
Children1.Thomas Heaton1 b. 27 May 1810
2.James Heaton4 b. 17 Oct 1811, d. 1 Jan 1885
3.Marguerite Heaton1 b. 23 Nov 1813
4.Jackson Heaton5 b. 6 Dec 1815, d. 26 Jul 1865
5.Daniel Heaton1 b. 27 Feb 1818
6.Joseph Heaton6 b. 11 Oct 1821, d. 9 Sep 1862
7.Samuel Heaton1 b. 21 Feb 1823
8.Elizabeth Heaton1 b. 2 Mar 1825
9.Susannah Heaton6 b. 14 May 1827, d. 1904
10.Charles Barton Heaton7 b. 6 May 1831, d. 23 Jun 1878
11.Ethel Heaton1 b. 1 Mar 1833, d. 11 Jun 1864

Citations

  1. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, in two volumes, with indexes in Volume II. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, the information in these volumes often proves to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. (Tempe, Arizona: published for the author by Graphics of Tempe, 1999), Volume II, Chapter 20, pages 768-769. Hereinafter cited as Heaton Families II.
  2. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, Volume II, Chapter 20, page 768, noting his date of death as 4 April 1843.
  3. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, Volume II, Chapter 20, pages 768-769, noting his date of death as 11 April 1842.
  4. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, Volume II, Chapter 20, pages 770-772.
  5. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, Volume II, Chapter 20, pages 772-773.
  6. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, Volume II, Chapter 20, pages 796-797.
  7. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, Volume II, Chapter 20, pages 799-800.

Susanna Barton1

b. 1794, d. 16 February 1850
ChartsDescendants of Robert Heaton of Yorkshire, The Immigrant
Birth*1794Susanna Barton was born in 1794 in Maryland.1
Marriage*She married John Heaton, son of William Heaton and Nancy Richardson.1
Residence*Susanna and John lived on the same farm all of their lives.1
Death*16 February 1850She died on 16 February 18501
Burial* and was buried in Fawn Grove Friends Cemetery, Fawn Grove, York County, Pennsylvania.1

Family

John Heaton b. 1792, d. 2 Sep 1867

Citations

  1. [S45] Dean Heaton, Heaton Families II, in two volumes, with indexes in Volume II. Warning: In this researcher's opinion, the information in these volumes often proves to be inaccurate. At the same time, the information presented has provided us with valuable clues for pursuing future research strategies in our attempt to establish a factual history of our Heaton family. (Tempe, Arizona: published for the author by Graphics of Tempe, 1999), Volume II, Chapter 20, pages 801-802. Hereinafter cited as Heaton Families II.

Christian Bass1

b. 19 December 1722
Father*Samuel Bass2
Mother*Christian Turell2 b. 17 Dec 1688
Birth*19 December 1722Christian Bass was born on 19 December 1722 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England),3
Baptism23 December 1722 and was baptized on 23 December 1722 at Old South Church, Boston.1
Marriage*4 January 1747She married John Armstrong on 4 January 1747 in Boston.4,5
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute2 March 1780 On 2 March 1780, Nathaniel Thayer, Cornelius Thayer, Samuel Bass, William Andrews, Deborah (Thayer) Whitworth, Hannah (Thayer) Abbott, Christian (Bass) Armstrong, Mary Thayer, Sarah (Thayer) White and Rebecca (Bass) Thomas Fowle, all of Boston and residual legatees resulting from the will of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell, submitted a document to the court addressing their concerns regarding the inequities between the value of silver and gold compared with the value of Continental currency, which had gone through several changes and devaluations during and after the Revolutionary War. In 1780, paper money in the new United States, called Continentals, was worth only about 1/40th of its face value. The document stated their understanding that Simon Tufts Esq. of Medford, as Executor to the last will and testament of Ebenezer Turell, late of Medford, Clerk, was entitled by the will to a legacy of £20, and was by virtue of his Executorship in possession of a sum of silver and gold coin, which according to a law of Massachusetts for regulating the value of silver and god coin, amounted to £503, 15s, 6p. Their petition went on to state that a dispute had arisen between the Executor Simon and several of the legatees regarding whether their legacies ought to be paid in silver and gold or in the present currency of the state. The petition's subscribers recommended that the Executor pay them 2/3 of their legacies in silver and gold, after deducting 1/2 of his own legacy, and that the Executor's other half be paid to himself in paper money. The petition went on to recommend that the £150 allowed the Executor for all his services in settling the estate be paid in paper money. The petition's subscribers, all residual legatees as the children, or their heirs, of Lydia (Turell) Thayer and Christian (Turell) Bass, both of whom were deceased sisters of the late Reverend Turell, agreed to be obligated to the court for the sum of £100,000 in lawful money of the state as protection for the Executor. Their document stated that in the case any debts owed to the estate were recovered which would increase the assets owed to the Executor, they would refund their prorated parts of those debts on the condition that their obligation of £100,000 to the court be voided and of no effect. Their petition concluded with the statement that should they fail to keep their agreement, their obligation would remain in full force and effect.6
(Residual Legatee) Massachusetts Money The pound was the currency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its colonial predecessors until 1793. Like the British pound sterling of that era, the Massachusetts pound was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence, but the Massachusetts and British pounds were not equivalent in value. British and other foreign coins were widely circulated in Massachusetts, supplemented by locally-produced coins between about 1652 and 1682 and by local paper money from 1690.

The paper money issued in colonial Massachusetts was denominated in pounds, shillings, and pence. Initially, six shillings were equal to one Spanish dollar. After years of high inflation, in 1749 Massachusetts withdrew its paper money from circulation and returned to money in the form of coin.

After the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, the Continental Congress began issuing paper money known as Continental currency, or Continentals. Continental currency was denominated in dollars from 1/6 of a dollar to $80, including many odd denominations in between. During the Revolution, Congress issued $241,552,780 in Continental currency.

Continental currency depreciated badly during the war, giving rise to the famous phrase "not worth a continental". Several factors contributed to the declining value. Monetary policy was not coordinated between Congress and the states which, like Massachusetts, continued to issue too many bills of credit not backed by tangible assets. Congress and the states lacked the will or the means to retire the bills from circulation through taxation or the sale of bonds. Another problem was that the British successfully waged economic warfare by counterfeiting Continentals on a large scale.

By the end of 1778, Continentals retained from 1/5 to 1/7 of their face value. By 1780, the bills were worth 1/40th of face value. Congress attempted to reform the currency by removing the old bills from circulation and issuing new ones, without success. By May 1781, Continentals had become so worthless that they ceased to circulate as money. Benjamin Franklin noted that the depreciation of the currency had, in effect, acted as a tax to pay for the war. In the 1790s, after the ratification of the United States Constitution, Continentals could be exchanged for treasury bonds at 1% of face value. The Massachusetts state currency depreciated greatly and was replaced by the U.S. dollar in 1793.

The painful experience of the runaway inflation and collapse of the Continental dollar prompted the delegates to the Constitutional Convention to include the gold and silver clause into the United States Constitution so that the individual states could not issue bills of credit, or "make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts." This restriction of bills of credit was extended to the Federal Government, as the power to "emit bills" from the Articles of Confederation was abolished, leaving Congress with the power "to borrow money on credit."7,8
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute9 March 1780During the course of the Turell probate, Simon Tufts Esq., Executor, submitted itemized reports to the court accounting for his payments to beneficiaries and the expenses he incurred on estate business. On 9 March 1780, the Executor listed cash paid in the amount of £329, 3s, 8p to the residuary legatees.6

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 162. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org.
  3. [S745] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org, page 154. Hereinafter cited as Boston Births, 1700-1800.
  4. [S1066] Communicated by Hamilton Andrews Hill A.M., "Memoranda by Hon. Samuel Turell Armstrong", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 44, pages 139-141 (April 1890). Hereinafter cited as "Samuel Turell Armstrong Memoranda."
  5. [S979] Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988.
  6. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  7. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_pound. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.
  8. [S225] Wikipedia Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_American_currency

Daniel Bass1

b. 12 February 1724/25, d. 19 January 1761
Father*Samuel Bass2
Mother*Christian Turell2 b. 17 Dec 1688
Birth*12 February 1724/25Daniel Bass was born on 12 February 1724/25 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England),3
Baptism14 February 1724/25 and was baptized on 14 February 1724/25 at Old South Church, Boston.4
Marriage*23 November 1752He married Bethiah Bowditch on 23 November 1752 at First Church, Boston.5,6
Death*19 January 1761He died on 19 January 1761 in Braintree, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England), at age 35.7
(Heir) Will9 November 1776The children of Daniel Bass, described as his deceased nephew, were named as beneficiaries of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell in his will dated 9 November 1776 in Medford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (Continental Congress). Turell's will gave Daniel's children 40 pounds sterling to be equally divided between them.8

Family

Bethiah Bowditch
Children1.Lydia Bass9 b. 2 Sep 1753
2.Samuel Bass9 b. 13 Oct 1754
3.Mary Bass9 b. 12 Sep 1755
4.Rebecca Bass9 b. 20 Feb 1757
5.Daniel Bass9 b. 3 Sep 1758

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 165. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org.
  3. [S1019] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Boston Births, 1700-1800.
  4. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 165. The year is indexed as 1724, however his name is listed in the group for 1725/26.
  5. [S1028] Transcribed by Rev. Anson Titus, "Marriages of Rev. Thomas Foxcroft, A.M., Boston, 1717-1769", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 42 (April 1888, pages 152-155 and July 1888, pages 250-254): page 253. Hereinafter cited as "Marriages of Thomas Foxcroft, Boston, 1717-1769."
  6. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 398.
  7. [S1029] Braintree, MA: Vital Records, 1643-1793, online at www.americanancestors.org. Hereinafter cited as Braintree Vital Records, 1643-1793.
  8. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  9. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 205.

Daniel Bass1

b. 3 September 1758
Father*Daniel Bass2 b. 12 Feb 1724/25, d. 19 Jan 1761
Mother*Bethiah Bowditch2
Baptism*3 September 1758Daniel Bass was baptized on 3 September 1758 at Old South Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 209. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 205.

Ebenezer Bass1

b. 8 November 1730
Father*Samuel Bass2
Mother*Christian Turell2 b. 17 Dec 1688
Baptism*8 November 1730Ebenezer Bass was baptized on 8 November 1730 at Old South Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 174. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org.

Lydia Bass1

b. 24 April 1718
Father*Samuel Bass2
Mother*Christian Turell2 b. 17 Dec 1688
Birth*24 April 1718Lydia Bass was born on 24 April 1718 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England),3
Baptism27 April 1718 and was baptized on 27 April 1718 at Old South Church, Boston.1
Marriage*16 June 1736She married Samuel Rogers on 16 June 1736 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England). They were married by the Reverend Joseph Sewall D.D.4
(Heir) Will9 November 1776The children of Lydia Rogers, described as his deceased niece, were named as beneficiaries of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell in his will dated 9 November 1776 in Medford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (Continental Congress). Turell's will gave Lydia (Bass) Rogers's children 40 pounds sterling to be equally divided between them.5

Family

Samuel Rogers

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 155. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org.
  3. [S1019] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Boston Births, 1700-1800.
  4. [S180] Boston, Massachusetts Marriages, 1700-1809, online at www.Ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Boston Marriages, 1700-1809.
  5. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

Lydia Bass1

b. 2 September 1753
Father*Daniel Bass2 b. 12 Feb 1724/25, d. 19 Jan 1761
Mother*Bethiah Bowditch2
Baptism*2 September 1753Lydia Bass was baptized on 2 September 1753 at Old South Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 205. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 205.

Mary Bass1

b. 10 March 1733/34
Father*Samuel Bass1
Mother*Christian Turell1 b. 17 Dec 1688
Baptism*10 March 1733/34Mary Bass was baptized on 10 March 1733/34 at Old South Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1
Marriage*19 March 1755She married William Andrews on 19 March 1755 in Boston.2

Family

William Andrews
Children1.Christian Andrews3,4 b. 2 May 1757
2.William Andrews5 b. 14 Mar 1761
3.Mary Andrews6 b. 3 Jun 1764

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 180. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S746] Boston, Massachusetts Marriages, 1700-1809, online at www.americanancestors.org, page 14. Hereinafter cited as Boston Marriages, 1700-1809.
  3. [S745] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org, City Document No. 43, page 290. Hereinafter cited as Boston Births, 1700-1800.
  4. [S745] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org, Records of the Old South Church in Boston, page 208.
  5. [S745] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org, City Document No. 43, page 300.
  6. [S979] Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988.

Mary Bass1

b. 12 September 1755
Father*Daniel Bass2 b. 12 Feb 1724/25, d. 19 Jan 1761
Mother*Bethiah Bowditch2
Baptism*12 September 1755Mary Bass was baptized on 12 September 1755 at Old South Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 206. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 205.

Rebecca Bass1

b. 27 December 1727
Father*Samuel Bass2
Mother*Christian Turell2 b. 17 Dec 1688
Birth*27 December 1727Rebecca Bass was born on 27 December 1727 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England),3
Baptism7 January 1727/28 was baptized on 7 January 1727/28 at Old South Church, Boston.1
Marriage*8 September 1748She married William Thomas on 8 September 1748 in Boston.4
Marriage*25 May 1769She married Zachariah Fowle on 25 May 1769 in Boston.4
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute2 March 1780 On 2 March 1780, Nathaniel Thayer, Cornelius Thayer, Samuel Bass, William Andrews, Deborah (Thayer) Whitworth, Hannah (Thayer) Abbott, Christian (Bass) Armstrong, Mary Thayer, Sarah (Thayer) White and Rebecca (Bass) Thomas Fowle, all of Boston and residual legatees resulting from the will of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell, submitted a document to the court addressing their concerns regarding the inequities between the value of silver and gold compared with the value of Continental currency, which had gone through several changes and devaluations during and after the Revolutionary War. In 1780, paper money in the new United States, called Continentals, was worth only about 1/40th of its face value. The document stated their understanding that Simon Tufts Esq. of Medford, as Executor to the last will and testament of Ebenezer Turell, late of Medford, Clerk, was entitled by the will to a legacy of £20, and was by virtue of his Executorship in possession of a sum of silver and gold coin, which according to a law of Massachusetts for regulating the value of silver and god coin, amounted to £503, 15s, 6p. Their petition went on to state that a dispute had arisen between the Executor Simon and several of the legatees regarding whether their legacies ought to be paid in silver and gold or in the present currency of the state. The petition's subscribers recommended that the Executor pay them 2/3 of their legacies in silver and gold, after deducting 1/2 of his own legacy, and that the Executor's other half be paid to himself in paper money. The petition went on to recommend that the £150 allowed the Executor for all his services in settling the estate be paid in paper money. The petition's subscribers, all residual legatees as the children, or their heirs, of Lydia (Turell) Thayer and Christian (Turell) Bass, both of whom were deceased sisters of the late Reverend Turell, agreed to be obligated to the court for the sum of £100,000 in lawful money of the state as protection for the Executor. Their document stated that in the case any debts owed to the estate were recovered which would increase the assets owed to the Executor, they would refund their prorated parts of those debts on the condition that their obligation of £100,000 to the court be voided and of no effect. Their petition concluded with the statement that should they fail to keep their agreement, their obligation would remain in full force and effect.5
(Residual Legatee) Massachusetts Money The pound was the currency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its colonial predecessors until 1793. Like the British pound sterling of that era, the Massachusetts pound was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence, but the Massachusetts and British pounds were not equivalent in value. British and other foreign coins were widely circulated in Massachusetts, supplemented by locally-produced coins between about 1652 and 1682 and by local paper money from 1690.

The paper money issued in colonial Massachusetts was denominated in pounds, shillings, and pence. Initially, six shillings were equal to one Spanish dollar. After years of high inflation, in 1749 Massachusetts withdrew its paper money from circulation and returned to money in the form of coin.

After the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, the Continental Congress began issuing paper money known as Continental currency, or Continentals. Continental currency was denominated in dollars from 1/6 of a dollar to $80, including many odd denominations in between. During the Revolution, Congress issued $241,552,780 in Continental currency.

Continental currency depreciated badly during the war, giving rise to the famous phrase "not worth a continental". Several factors contributed to the declining value. Monetary policy was not coordinated between Congress and the states which, like Massachusetts, continued to issue too many bills of credit not backed by tangible assets. Congress and the states lacked the will or the means to retire the bills from circulation through taxation or the sale of bonds. Another problem was that the British successfully waged economic warfare by counterfeiting Continentals on a large scale.

By the end of 1778, Continentals retained from 1/5 to 1/7 of their face value. By 1780, the bills were worth 1/40th of face value. Congress attempted to reform the currency by removing the old bills from circulation and issuing new ones, without success. By May 1781, Continentals had become so worthless that they ceased to circulate as money. Benjamin Franklin noted that the depreciation of the currency had, in effect, acted as a tax to pay for the war. In the 1790s, after the ratification of the United States Constitution, Continentals could be exchanged for treasury bonds at 1% of face value. The Massachusetts state currency depreciated greatly and was replaced by the U.S. dollar in 1793.

The painful experience of the runaway inflation and collapse of the Continental dollar prompted the delegates to the Constitutional Convention to include the gold and silver clause into the United States Constitution so that the individual states could not issue bills of credit, or "make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts." This restriction of bills of credit was extended to the Federal Government, as the power to "emit bills" from the Articles of Confederation was abolished, leaving Congress with the power "to borrow money on credit."6,7
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute9 March 1780During the course of the Turell probate, Simon Tufts Esq., Executor, submitted itemized reports to the court accounting for his payments to beneficiaries and the expenses he incurred on estate business. On 9 March 1780, the Executor listed cash paid in the amount of £329, 3s, 8p to the residuary legatees.5

Family 1

William Thomas

Family 2

Zachariah Fowle

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 169. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org.
  3. [S1019] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.ancestry.com, her name "Rebekah". Hereinafter cited as Boston Births, 1700-1800.
  4. [S979] Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988.
  5. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  6. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_pound. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.
  7. [S225] Wikipedia Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_American_currency

Rebecca Bass1

b. 20 February 1757
Father*Daniel Bass2 b. 12 Feb 1724/25, d. 19 Jan 1761
Mother*Bethiah Bowditch2
Baptism*20 February 1757Rebecca Bass was baptized on 20 February 1757 at Old South Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 208. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 205.

Samuel Bass1

Religion*18 February 1704Samuel became a member of the Old South Church, Boston, on 18 February 1704.2
Marriage*9 April 1717He married Christian Turell, daughter of Samuel Turell and Lydia Stoddard, on 9 April 1717 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England). They were married by the Presbyterian Reverend Mr. John Webb.1

Family

Christian Turell b. 17 Dec 1688
Children1.Lydia Bass3 b. 24 Apr 1718
2.Samuel Bass4 b. 28 Apr 1720
3.Christian Bass3 b. 19 Dec 1722
4.Daniel Bass+3 b. 12 Feb 1724/25, d. 19 Jan 1761
5.Rebecca Bass3 b. 27 Dec 1727
6.Ebenezer Bass3 b. 8 Nov 1730
7.Mary Bass+5 b. 10 Mar 1733/34

Citations

  1. [S746] Boston, Massachusetts Marriages, 1700-1809, online at www.americanancestors.org. Hereinafter cited as Boston Marriages, 1700-1809.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 18. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  3. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org.
  4. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, page 142.
  5. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 180.

Samuel Bass1

b. 28 April 1720
Father*Samuel Bass2
Mother*Christian Turell2 b. 17 Dec 1688
Birth*28 April 1720Samuel Bass was born on 28 April 1720 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England),3
Baptism1 May 1720 and was baptized on 1 May 1720 at Old South Church, Boston.4
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute2 March 1780 On 2 March 1780, Nathaniel Thayer, Cornelius Thayer, Samuel Bass, William Andrews, Deborah (Thayer) Whitworth, Hannah (Thayer) Abbott, Christian (Bass) Armstrong, Mary Thayer, Sarah (Thayer) White and Rebecca (Bass) Thomas Fowle, all of Boston and residual legatees resulting from the will of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell, submitted a document to the court addressing their concerns regarding the inequities between the value of silver and gold compared with the value of Continental currency, which had gone through several changes and devaluations during and after the Revolutionary War. In 1780, paper money in the new United States, called Continentals, was worth only about 1/40th of its face value. The document stated their understanding that Simon Tufts Esq. of Medford, as Executor to the last will and testament of Ebenezer Turell, late of Medford, Clerk, was entitled by the will to a legacy of £20, and was by virtue of his Executorship in possession of a sum of silver and gold coin, which according to a law of Massachusetts for regulating the value of silver and god coin, amounted to £503, 15s, 6p. Their petition went on to state that a dispute had arisen between the Executor Simon and several of the legatees regarding whether their legacies ought to be paid in silver and gold or in the present currency of the state. The petition's subscribers recommended that the Executor pay them 2/3 of their legacies in silver and gold, after deducting 1/2 of his own legacy, and that the Executor's other half be paid to himself in paper money. The petition went on to recommend that the £150 allowed the Executor for all his services in settling the estate be paid in paper money. The petition's subscribers, all residual legatees as the children, or their heirs, of Lydia (Turell) Thayer and Christian (Turell) Bass, both of whom were deceased sisters of the late Reverend Turell, agreed to be obligated to the court for the sum of £100,000 in lawful money of the state as protection for the Executor. Their document stated that in the case any debts owed to the estate were recovered which would increase the assets owed to the Executor, they would refund their prorated parts of those debts on the condition that their obligation of £100,000 to the court be voided and of no effect. Their petition concluded with the statement that should they fail to keep their agreement, their obligation would remain in full force and effect.5
(Residual Legatee) Massachusetts Money The pound was the currency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its colonial predecessors until 1793. Like the British pound sterling of that era, the Massachusetts pound was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence, but the Massachusetts and British pounds were not equivalent in value. British and other foreign coins were widely circulated in Massachusetts, supplemented by locally-produced coins between about 1652 and 1682 and by local paper money from 1690.

The paper money issued in colonial Massachusetts was denominated in pounds, shillings, and pence. Initially, six shillings were equal to one Spanish dollar. After years of high inflation, in 1749 Massachusetts withdrew its paper money from circulation and returned to money in the form of coin.

After the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, the Continental Congress began issuing paper money known as Continental currency, or Continentals. Continental currency was denominated in dollars from 1/6 of a dollar to $80, including many odd denominations in between. During the Revolution, Congress issued $241,552,780 in Continental currency.

Continental currency depreciated badly during the war, giving rise to the famous phrase "not worth a continental". Several factors contributed to the declining value. Monetary policy was not coordinated between Congress and the states which, like Massachusetts, continued to issue too many bills of credit not backed by tangible assets. Congress and the states lacked the will or the means to retire the bills from circulation through taxation or the sale of bonds. Another problem was that the British successfully waged economic warfare by counterfeiting Continentals on a large scale.

By the end of 1778, Continentals retained from 1/5 to 1/7 of their face value. By 1780, the bills were worth 1/40th of face value. Congress attempted to reform the currency by removing the old bills from circulation and issuing new ones, without success. By May 1781, Continentals had become so worthless that they ceased to circulate as money. Benjamin Franklin noted that the depreciation of the currency had, in effect, acted as a tax to pay for the war. In the 1790s, after the ratification of the United States Constitution, Continentals could be exchanged for treasury bonds at 1% of face value. The Massachusetts state currency depreciated greatly and was replaced by the U.S. dollar in 1793.

The painful experience of the runaway inflation and collapse of the Continental dollar prompted the delegates to the Constitutional Convention to include the gold and silver clause into the United States Constitution so that the individual states could not issue bills of credit, or "make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts." This restriction of bills of credit was extended to the Federal Government, as the power to "emit bills" from the Articles of Confederation was abolished, leaving Congress with the power "to borrow money on credit."6,7
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute9 March 1780During the course of the Turell probate, Simon Tufts Esq., Executor, submitted itemized reports to the court accounting for his payments to beneficiaries and the expenses he incurred on estate business. On 9 March 1780, the Executor listed cash paid in the amount of £329, 3s, 8p to the residuary legatees.5

Citations

  1. [S745] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org, page 142. Hereinafter cited as Boston Births, 1700-1800.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, page 142. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  3. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 142.
  4. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 158.
  5. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  6. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_pound. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.
  7. [S225] Wikipedia Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_American_currency

Samuel Bass1

b. 13 October 1754
Father*Daniel Bass2 b. 12 Feb 1724/25, d. 19 Jan 1761
Mother*Bethiah Bowditch2
Baptism*13 October 1754Samuel Bass was baptized on 13 October 1754 at Old South Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Old South Church, page 205. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 205.

Jane Bassett1

Marriage*She married John Deighton in England.1

Family

John Deighton
Child1.Frances Deighton+1 b. 1 Mar 1611, d. bt 20 Oct 1703 - 7 Mar 1705

Citations

  1. [S1192] Winifred Lovering Holman, "English Ancestry of Richard Williams and his wife Frances (Deighton) Williams", viewed and printed from NEHGS online at www.americanancestors.org, The American Genealogist and New Haven Genealogical Magazine, Volumes 9 and 10 (1932-1933): Volume 9, page 138. Hereinafter cited as "Richard Williams and Frances Deighton."

Mary Bassett1

d. 21 May 1734
Marriage*She married Richard Jennings in Bridgewater, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1,2
Death*21 May 1734She died on 21 May 1734 in Bridgewater.1,3

Family

Richard Jennings d. 23 Sep 1751
Child1.Hannah Jennings+1

Citations

  1. [S474] Nahum Mitchell, History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, including an extensive Family Register. Note: page numbers differ slightly between publications used in our research, including FHL copy, Google Books, Boston Public Library EBooks online and our personal library reprint published by Heritage Books. (Baltimore, Maryland: Gateway Press, Inc., original publication date was 1840; reprinted for the third and fourth times in 1970 and 1975; first reprinted in 1897 by Henry T. Pratt, Bridgewater, Massachusetts; originally printed in 1840 by Kidder and Wright, Boston, Massachusetts), Jennings, page 203. Hereinafter cited as History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater.
  2. [S413] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages: Prior to 1700 (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1985 and 1992), page 418. Hereinafter cited as New England Marriages: Prior to 1700.
  3. [S836] New England Historic Genealogical Society, compiler, downloaded from Google Books, Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts to the Year 1850. In two Volumes: Volume I. Births and Volume II. Marriages and Deaths. (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1916), Deaths, Volume II, page 499. Hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts to 1850.

John Bates1

Marriage*21 May 1733He married Abigail Bailey, daughter of John Bailey and Abigail Clap, on 21 May 1733 in the First Parish Church, Scituate, Plymouth County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1,2

Family

Abigail Bailey b. 4 Feb 1712/13

Citations

  1. [S856] Samuel Deane, History of Scituate, Massachusetts, from its first settlement to 1831, downloaded from Google Books at www.google.com. (Boston, Massachusetts: James Loring, 1831), John Bailey, pages 213-215. Hereinafter cited as History of Scituate, Massachusetts to 1831.
  2. [S853] New England Historic Genealogical Society, compiler, Vital Records of Scituate, Massachusetts, to the year 1850, downloaded from the Boston Public Library EBooks and Texts Archive at www.archive.org. Volume 1. Births and Volume 2. Marriages and Deaths. (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society at the charge of the Eddy Town Record Fund, 1909), Volume II, Marriages, page 13, referencing C.R.1: citing a church record, First Parish, and records from Rev. John Lothrop’s original manuscript. Hereinafter cited as Scituate Vital Records to 1850.