Deborah Thayer1

b. 27 January 1714
Father*Cornelius Thayer2 b. 14 Nov 1684, d. 1745
Mother*Lydia Turell2 b. 8 Jul 1683
Birth*27 January 1714Deborah Thayer was born on 27 January 1714 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1
Marriage*31 October 1744She married Miles Whitworth on 31 October 1744 in Boston.3
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute2 March 1780 On 2 March 1780, Nathaniel Thayer, Cornelius Thayer, Samuel Bass, William Andrews, Deborah (Thayer) Whitworth, Hannah (Thayer) Abbott, Christian (Bass) Armstrong, Mary Thayer, Sarah (Thayer) White and Rebecca (Bass) Thomas Fowle, all of Boston and residual legatees resulting from the will of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell, submitted a document to the court addressing their concerns regarding the inequities between the value of silver and gold compared with the value of Continental currency, which had gone through several changes and devaluations during and after the Revolutionary War. In 1780, paper money in the new United States, called Continentals, was worth only about 1/40th of its face value. The document stated their understanding that Simon Tufts Esq. of Medford, as Executor to the last will and testament of Ebenezer Turell, late of Medford, Clerk, was entitled by the will to a legacy of £20, and was by virtue of his Executorship in possession of a sum of silver and gold coin, which according to a law of Massachusetts for regulating the value of silver and god coin, amounted to £503, 15s, 6p. Their petition went on to state that a dispute had arisen between the Executor Simon and several of the legatees regarding whether their legacies ought to be paid in silver and gold or in the present currency of the state. The petition's subscribers recommended that the Executor pay them 2/3 of their legacies in silver and gold, after deducting 1/2 of his own legacy, and that the Executor's other half be paid to himself in paper money. The petition went on to recommend that the £150 allowed the Executor for all his services in settling the estate be paid in paper money. The petition's subscribers, all residual legatees as the children, or their heirs, of Lydia (Turell) Thayer and Christian (Turell) Bass, both of whom were deceased sisters of the late Reverend Turell, agreed to be obligated to the court for the sum of £100,000 in lawful money of the state as protection for the Executor. Their document stated that in the case any debts owed to the estate were recovered which would increase the assets owed to the Executor, they would refund their prorated parts of those debts on the condition that their obligation of £100,000 to the court be voided and of no effect. Their petition concluded with the statement that should they fail to keep their agreement, their obligation would remain in full force and effect.4
(Residual Legatee) Massachusetts Money The pound was the currency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its colonial predecessors until 1793. Like the British pound sterling of that era, the Massachusetts pound was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence, but the Massachusetts and British pounds were not equivalent in value. British and other foreign coins were widely circulated in Massachusetts, supplemented by locally-produced coins between about 1652 and 1682 and by local paper money from 1690.

The paper money issued in colonial Massachusetts was denominated in pounds, shillings, and pence. Initially, six shillings were equal to one Spanish dollar. After years of high inflation, in 1749 Massachusetts withdrew its paper money from circulation and returned to money in the form of coin.

After the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, the Continental Congress began issuing paper money known as Continental currency, or Continentals. Continental currency was denominated in dollars from 1/6 of a dollar to $80, including many odd denominations in between. During the Revolution, Congress issued $241,552,780 in Continental currency.

Continental currency depreciated badly during the war, giving rise to the famous phrase "not worth a continental". Several factors contributed to the declining value. Monetary policy was not coordinated between Congress and the states which, like Massachusetts, continued to issue too many bills of credit not backed by tangible assets. Congress and the states lacked the will or the means to retire the bills from circulation through taxation or the sale of bonds. Another problem was that the British successfully waged economic warfare by counterfeiting Continentals on a large scale.

By the end of 1778, Continentals retained from 1/5 to 1/7 of their face value. By 1780, the bills were worth 1/40th of face value. Congress attempted to reform the currency by removing the old bills from circulation and issuing new ones, without success. By May 1781, Continentals had become so worthless that they ceased to circulate as money. Benjamin Franklin noted that the depreciation of the currency had, in effect, acted as a tax to pay for the war. In the 1790s, after the ratification of the United States Constitution, Continentals could be exchanged for treasury bonds at 1% of face value. The Massachusetts state currency depreciated greatly and was replaced by the U.S. dollar in 1793.

The painful experience of the runaway inflation and collapse of the Continental dollar prompted the delegates to the Constitutional Convention to include the gold and silver clause into the United States Constitution so that the individual states could not issue bills of credit, or "make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts." This restriction of bills of credit was extended to the Federal Government, as the power to "emit bills" from the Articles of Confederation was abolished, leaving Congress with the power "to borrow money on credit."5,6
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute9 March 1780During the course of the Turell probate, Simon Tufts Esq., Executor, submitted itemized reports to the court accounting for his payments to beneficiaries and the expenses he incurred on estate business. On 9 March 1780, the Executor listed cash paid in the amount of £329, 3s, 8p to the residuary legatees.4

Citations

  1. [S745] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org, page 101. Hereinafter cited as Boston Births, 1700-1800.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 300. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  3. [S746] Boston, Massachusetts Marriages, 1700-1809, online at www.americanancestors.org, page 279. Hereinafter cited as Boston Marriages, 1700-1809.
  4. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  5. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_pound. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.
  6. [S225] Wikipedia Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_American_currency

Ebenezer Thayer1

b. 16 July 1734, d. 6 September 1792
Father*Nathaniel Thayer3,2 b. 17 Jul 1710, d. 15 Dec 1786
Mother*Ruth Eliot2,3 b. 20 Sep 1711, d. 1746
Birth*16 July 1734Ebenezer Thayer was born on 16 July 1734 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England),4,5,3
Baptism21 July 1734 and was baptized on 21 July 1734 at First Church, Boston.6
Education*1753Ebenezer graduated from Harvard College, Boston, in 1753.5
Occupation*17 September 1766The Reverend Ebenezer Thayer was the pastor of the First Congregational Church, Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, from 17 September 1766 until his death in 1792.5,7
Marriage*2 October 1766He married Martha Cotton, daughter of Reverend John Cotton and Mary Gibbs, on 2 October 1766 in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).5,8
(Heir) Will9 November 1776The Reverend Ebenezer Thayer, described as his beloved nephew, was named as a beneficiary of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell in his will dated 9 November 1776 in Medford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (Continental Congress). Turell's will gave Thayer his preaching Bible and a collection of religious books and his silk cloak from London.1
Death*6 September 1792He died suddenly, from an oppression upon his breast, on 6 September 1792 in Hampton at age 585,9,10,11
Burial* and was buried in Pine Grove Cemetery, Hampton.11

Family

Martha Cotton b. 30 Nov 1739, d. c 1809
Children1.Ebenezer Thayer12 b. 15 Jul 1767
2.Reverend Nathaniel Thayer+5,13 b. 11 Jul 1769, d. 23 Jun 1840
3.Martha Thayer14 b. 21 Apr 1771
4.John Thayer15 b. 14 Jul 1773
5.Katherine Thayer16 b. 28 Sep 1779
6.Andrew Eliot Thayer17 b. 4 Nov 1783

Citations

  1. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  2. [S452] The Thayer Families Association Website, online at www.thayerfamilies.com, Richard Thayer, First 5 Generations. Hereinafter cited as Thayer Families Association Website.
  3. [S979] Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988.
  4. [S748] Find a Grave website, including some cemetery and tombstone photos obtained from site, online at www.findagrave.com, Reverend Ebenezer Thayer, Memorial# 16999380, created by Marc Thayer III, noting date of birth as 06 July 1734. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave website.
  5. [S1022] Rev. Increase N. Tarbox, "Necrology of the New-England Historic Genealogical Society (Nathaniel Thayer A.M.)", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 37 (October 1883): page 413. Hereinafter cited as "Nathaniel Thayer Necrology."
  6. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 312. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  7. [S1021] The Meeting Houses of Hampton (New Hampshire), online at http://www.hampton.lib.nh.us/hampton. Hereinafter cited as Meeting Houses of Hampton.
  8. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Newton Marriages, page 264. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  9. [S1039] Hampton, NH: Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 2, page 189. Hereinafter cited as Hampton Vital Records to 1900.
  10. [S1039] Hampton Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 209.
  11. [S748] Find a Grave website, online at www.findagrave.com, Reverend Ebenezer Thayer, Memorial# 16999380, created by Marc Thayer III.
  12. [S1039] Hampton Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 214.
  13. [S1039] Hampton Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 216.
  14. [S1039] Hampton Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 218.
  15. [S1039] Hampton Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 219.
  16. [S1039] Hampton Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 224.
  17. [S1039] Hampton Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 226.

Ebenezer Thayer1

b. 15 July 1767
Father*Ebenezer Thayer1 b. 16 Jul 1734, d. 6 Sep 1792
Mother*Martha Cotton1 b. 30 Nov 1739, d. c 1809
Birth*15 July 1767Ebenezer Thayer was born on 15 July 1767 in Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire,1
Baptism19 July 1767 and was baptized on 19 July 1767 in Hampton.2

Citations

  1. [S1039] Hampton, NH: Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 214. Hereinafter cited as Hampton Vital Records to 1900.
  2. [S1039] Hampton Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 2, page 109.

Ferdinando Thayer1

b. 18 April 1625, d. 28 March 1712
BirthFerdinando Thayer was born in Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England.2
Baptism*18 April 1625Ferdinando Tayer was baptized on 18 April 1625 at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England. His Godparents were Ferdinando TAYER and William TAYER as Godfathers, and Margarett KING as Godmother.3,4,5
Marriage*14 November 1652He married Huldah Hayward, daughter of William Hayward and Margery ______, on 14 November 1652 in Braintree, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England). They were married by Captain Torrey.1,6,7
Note* Ferdinando Thayer was one of the original grantees and proprietors of Mendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts to which he removed, originally, in 1663. Mendon was a new plantation at the time, and called Nipmug. Ferdinando was forced to return to Braintree with his family for several years during King Philip's War when Mendon was abandoned and his house there burnt, according to court records. He and his son Jonathan Thayer took the oath of allegiance in Braintree about 1678.(Volume 29 - Boston Records Commissioners Reports)

According to Alexander H. Allen, Town Clerk of Mendon, Mendon was first settled by the whites as a plantation in 1662, and continued in that union until 1667, when it was invested with town privileges by the general court of the commonwealth, and so remained until the breaking out of the Indian hostilities in 1675, when the settlement was broken up, the settlers fleeing to Braintree and Weymouth, where they stayed until 1679 or '80. After January 3rd, 1680, there has been no interruption up to the “present time” of 1859.

Ferdinando held many offices of honor in his town and commonwealth and was a man of wealth in his day and age of the world. He provided all of his sons with farms, and several of his sons became extensive land dealers, and many of their descendants occupied those farms, never changing title, for over two hundred years. Before King Philip's war, his name was in the minutes of Mendon’s first town meeting held in June 1667, as selectman. He was selectman in Mendon 1667-70, 1672, 1674, perhaps in 1675, in 1680,1685,1686 and 1688; surveyor of highways in 1682-3 and in 1687. According to the Preserved Smith Thayer Missal, now reported to be in the possession of a relative in Worcester, his house lot of 40 acres was a little south of the residence (1859) of Alexander H. Allen. It was bounded on the east by Muddy Brook, south by the house lot of John Rockwood, west by the house lot of Samuel Hayward, and north by the house lot of John Gurney. His son Benjamin received all his lands that he had not previously deeded to his other sons, Jonathan, Thomas, Samuel, and Isaac.

Ferdinando's name is inscribed on a monument in Founders' Park, Mendon, Massachusetts, as one of the first settlers of that town.8
Land Grant*January 1674 He had a tract of land set off for him in January, 1674, as well as other lands also.
Land Grant26 May 1686 After the Indians burned the town, Ferdinando returned and again took lands which included a forty-acre house lot.

Ferdinando Thayer's was the last house on the 10 Rod Road. This was very near the now Blackstone Line, as is the Pine Hill Cemetery. There are more Thayers buried in Pine Hill Cemetery and in Blackstone, Massachusetts, than in Old Cemetery in the center of Mendon.
Marriage*before 1696He married Ann Freebury before 1696.

She was probably the widow of either Nicholas Freeby whom Savage mentions as being at Casco about 1680, or of Richard Friebury Sr. who was taxed at Pemaquid in 1687 (NEHG Register Volume 32, page 314). No record of her marriage or death has been found except in the court records at Boston which contain much information about her life in Mendon and her violent domestic quarrels with Ferdinando Thayer and his sons to whom he deeded his property, partly at least to prevent her from acquiring it. (Records of Supreme Court of Judicature #4657,4845,4703,4727, Suffolk County Courthouse, Boston).

Ann Freeberry (or Freebury) was an 'eastern woman', meaning from Maine, who had probably been driven away by the Indian Wars.
Divorce*He and Ann Freebury were divorced.
Death*28 March 1712He died on 28 March 1712 in Mendon, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England), at age 86.1,9

Family 1

Huldah Hayward b. c 1636, d. 1 Sep 1690

Family 2

Ann Freebury b. c 1648

Citations

  1. [S442] Oliver Ray Pardo, "The Families of Ray Benson Pardo and Viola Berliot Stevens", 28 December 1996 (Port Orchard, Washington). . Hereinafter cited as "The Families of Pardo and Stevens."
  2. [S448] Prepared by William B. Trask of Dorchester, "Abstracts from the Earliest Wills on Record in the County of Suffolk, Massachusetts", New England Historical & Genealogical Register Volume 13 (October 1859): page 335 footnote. Hereinafter cited as "Abstracts of Early Wills - NEHGR."
  3. [S449] Family History Library, A Genealogical record of some of the descendants of John Thayer, 1500-1975; Microfilm number 982181, item 10, LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as John Thayer Descendants 1500-1975.
  4. [S450] Reproduction of: English origins of New England families : from the New England historical and genealogical registers and first and second series / selected and introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts, English origins of New England Families, 1500s-1800s, CD-ROM (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, original publish dates 1984-1985 in 6 volumes; reproduced by Broderbund, c 1966), Series II, Volume 3. Hereinafter cited as English origins of New England families.
  5. [S458] Walter Faxon, Edward Henry Whorf and introduction and notes by Henry Ernest Woods, "Tayer (Thayer) Family Entries in the Parish Registry of Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England", New England Historical & Genealogical Register Volume 60 (July 1906): page 285. Hereinafter cited as "Tayer (Thayer) in Thornbury Parish Records - NEHGR."
  6. [S445] A faithful and exact copy of the original records without any abridgment or variation and copied by various members of the NEHGS from the original records, "Early Records of Boston, Massachusetts", New England Historical & Genealogical Register Volumes 2 - 12 (published as a continuation from January 1848 through 1858): Volume 12, April 1858, page 110; "Brantrey" Marriages. Hereinafter cited as "Boston Records - NEHGR."
  7. [S447] Braintree Massachusetts Town Records - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org. Hereinafter cited as Braintree Town Records - NEHGS.
  8. [S454] Bezaleel J. Thayer, Memorial of the Thayer name from the Massachusetts colony of Weymouth and Braintree: embracing genealogical and biographical sketches of Richard and Thomas Thayer, and their descendants, from 1636 to 1874, FHL film number 1081, item 1 (Salt Lake City, Utah: Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1957; microreproduction of book published in 1874 by R. J. Oliphant, Oswego, New York), pages 221-223. Hereinafter cited as Thayer name Massachusetts Memorial 1636-1874.
  9. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.

Hannah Thayer1

b. 1716
Father*Cornelius Thayer2 b. 14 Nov 1684, d. 1745
Mother*Lydia Turell2 b. 8 Jul 1683
Birth*1716Hannah Thayer was born in 1716.1
Marriage*8 May 1739She married Richard Abbott on 8 May 1739 in First Church, Boston.3
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute2 March 1780 On 2 March 1780, Nathaniel Thayer, Cornelius Thayer, Samuel Bass, William Andrews, Deborah (Thayer) Whitworth, Hannah (Thayer) Abbott, Christian (Bass) Armstrong, Mary Thayer, Sarah (Thayer) White and Rebecca (Bass) Thomas Fowle, all of Boston and residual legatees resulting from the will of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell, submitted a document to the court addressing their concerns regarding the inequities between the value of silver and gold compared with the value of Continental currency, which had gone through several changes and devaluations during and after the Revolutionary War. In 1780, paper money in the new United States, called Continentals, was worth only about 1/40th of its face value. The document stated their understanding that Simon Tufts Esq. of Medford, as Executor to the last will and testament of Ebenezer Turell, late of Medford, Clerk, was entitled by the will to a legacy of £20, and was by virtue of his Executorship in possession of a sum of silver and gold coin, which according to a law of Massachusetts for regulating the value of silver and god coin, amounted to £503, 15s, 6p. Their petition went on to state that a dispute had arisen between the Executor Simon and several of the legatees regarding whether their legacies ought to be paid in silver and gold or in the present currency of the state. The petition's subscribers recommended that the Executor pay them 2/3 of their legacies in silver and gold, after deducting 1/2 of his own legacy, and that the Executor's other half be paid to himself in paper money. The petition went on to recommend that the £150 allowed the Executor for all his services in settling the estate be paid in paper money. The petition's subscribers, all residual legatees as the children, or their heirs, of Lydia (Turell) Thayer and Christian (Turell) Bass, both of whom were deceased sisters of the late Reverend Turell, agreed to be obligated to the court for the sum of £100,000 in lawful money of the state as protection for the Executor. Their document stated that in the case any debts owed to the estate were recovered which would increase the assets owed to the Executor, they would refund their prorated parts of those debts on the condition that their obligation of £100,000 to the court be voided and of no effect. Their petition concluded with the statement that should they fail to keep their agreement, their obligation would remain in full force and effect.4
(Residual Legatee) Massachusetts Money The pound was the currency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its colonial predecessors until 1793. Like the British pound sterling of that era, the Massachusetts pound was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence, but the Massachusetts and British pounds were not equivalent in value. British and other foreign coins were widely circulated in Massachusetts, supplemented by locally-produced coins between about 1652 and 1682 and by local paper money from 1690.

The paper money issued in colonial Massachusetts was denominated in pounds, shillings, and pence. Initially, six shillings were equal to one Spanish dollar. After years of high inflation, in 1749 Massachusetts withdrew its paper money from circulation and returned to money in the form of coin.

After the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, the Continental Congress began issuing paper money known as Continental currency, or Continentals. Continental currency was denominated in dollars from 1/6 of a dollar to $80, including many odd denominations in between. During the Revolution, Congress issued $241,552,780 in Continental currency.

Continental currency depreciated badly during the war, giving rise to the famous phrase "not worth a continental". Several factors contributed to the declining value. Monetary policy was not coordinated between Congress and the states which, like Massachusetts, continued to issue too many bills of credit not backed by tangible assets. Congress and the states lacked the will or the means to retire the bills from circulation through taxation or the sale of bonds. Another problem was that the British successfully waged economic warfare by counterfeiting Continentals on a large scale.

By the end of 1778, Continentals retained from 1/5 to 1/7 of their face value. By 1780, the bills were worth 1/40th of face value. Congress attempted to reform the currency by removing the old bills from circulation and issuing new ones, without success. By May 1781, Continentals had become so worthless that they ceased to circulate as money. Benjamin Franklin noted that the depreciation of the currency had, in effect, acted as a tax to pay for the war. In the 1790s, after the ratification of the United States Constitution, Continentals could be exchanged for treasury bonds at 1% of face value. The Massachusetts state currency depreciated greatly and was replaced by the U.S. dollar in 1793.

The painful experience of the runaway inflation and collapse of the Continental dollar prompted the delegates to the Constitutional Convention to include the gold and silver clause into the United States Constitution so that the individual states could not issue bills of credit, or "make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts." This restriction of bills of credit was extended to the Federal Government, as the power to "emit bills" from the Articles of Confederation was abolished, leaving Congress with the power "to borrow money on credit."5,6
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute9 March 1780During the course of the Turell probate, Simon Tufts Esq., Executor, submitted itemized reports to the court accounting for his payments to beneficiaries and the expenses he incurred on estate business. On 9 March 1780, the Executor listed cash paid in the amount of £329, 3s, 8p to the residuary legatees.4

Citations

  1. [S1067] Patricia Thayer Muno, Descendants of Richard Thayer, Immigrant to America 1641, through the 19th Century, downloaded from the Family History Library at www.familysearch.org. (Beaverton, Oregon: Desktop Publishing, 1992), Descendants of Richard Thayer, page 129. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of Richard Thayer.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 300. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  3. [S746] Boston, Massachusetts Marriages, 1700-1809, online at www.americanancestors.org, Records of the First Church in Boston, page 397. Hereinafter cited as Boston Marriages, 1700-1809.
  4. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  5. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_pound. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.
  6. [S225] Wikipedia Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_American_currency

Jael Thayer

b. 2 June 1633, d. 10 March 1701
Father*Richard Thayer1 b. 5 Apr 1601
Mother*Dorothy Mortimore1
Baptism*2 June 1633Jaell Tayer was baptized on 2 June 1633 at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England. Her Godparents were Richard Dymmerie as Godfather and Katheryne Dawney and Agnes Tayer as Godmothers.1
(Daughter) Immigrationcirca 1641Shortly after the death of her mother, Jael Thayer immigrated with her father and seven siblings in circa 1641 to America with his eight children. The family settled in Braintree, Massachusetts following Richard's older brother, Thomas Thayer, who had immigrated in 1637 with his family and also settled in Braintree.2,3
Marriage*17 January 1654She married John Harbour Jr. on 17 January 1654 in Braintree, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony (New England). Their marriage was performed by Captain Tory (sic) of Weymouth.4
Death*10 March 1701She died on 10 March 1701 in Braintree, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England), at age 67.4

Family

John Harbour Jr.
Child1.Esther Harbor+5 b. 1663

Citations

  1. [S458] Walter Faxon, Edward Henry Whorf and introduction and notes by Henry Ernest Woods, "Tayer (Thayer) Family Entries in the Parish Registry of Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England", New England Historical & Genealogical Register Volume 60 (July 1906): page 286. Hereinafter cited as "Tayer (Thayer) in Thornbury Parish Records - NEHGR."
  2. [S458] Walter Faxon, Edward Henry Whorf and introduction and notes by Henry Ernest Woods, "Tayer (Thayer) in Thornbury Parish Records - NEHGR", page 284 footnote.
  3. [S452] The Thayer Families Association Website, online at www.thayerfamilies.com, Richard Thayer, First 5 Generations. Hereinafter cited as Thayer Families Association Website.
  4. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.
  5. [S869] Marcus Taft Jones, Hayward-Howard genealogy and family history: descendants of William and Margery Hayward of Braintree, Massachusetts, 1648; earlier of Weymouth. Microfilm of typescript at the Rhode Island Historical Society in Providence, Rhode Island. Hayward genealogy 1648-1690: pages 133-150; FHL Film# 22344, Item 2, LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as Hayward-Howard genealogy and family history.

Joanna Thayer1

Marriage*7 January 1689/90She married John Crossman on 7 January 1689/90 in Taunton, Bristol County, Massachusetts (Plymouth Colony).2,1

Family

John Crossman
Child1.Abigail Crossman+1,2 b. 7 Oct 1690, d. 22 Jan 1767

Citations

  1. [S1194] Thomas J. Lothrop, The Nicholas White Family, 1643-1900, downloaded from Google Books at www.google.com. (Taunton, Massachusetts: Thomas J. Lothrop, printed by C.A. Hack & Son, 1902), page 22. Hereinafter cited as Nicholas White Family, 1643-1900.
  2. [S451] Massachusetts Vital Records to the Year 1850 - NEHGS, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, Taunton Marriages, Volume 2, page 126. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 - NEHGS.

John Thayer1

b. 14 July 1773
Father*Ebenezer Thayer1 b. 16 Jul 1734, d. 6 Sep 1792
Mother*Martha Cotton1 b. 30 Nov 1739, d. c 1809
Birth*14 July 1773John Thayer was born on 14 July 1773 in Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.1

Citations

  1. [S1039] Hampton, NH: Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 219. Hereinafter cited as Hampton Vital Records to 1900.

Joseph Thayer1

Marriage*1727He married Hannah Hayward, daughter of William Hayward and Esther Harbor, in 1727.1

Citations

  1. [S869] Marcus Taft Jones, Hayward-Howard genealogy and family history: descendants of William and Margery Hayward of Braintree, Massachusetts, 1648; earlier of Weymouth. Microfilm of typescript at the Rhode Island Historical Society in Providence, Rhode Island. Hayward genealogy 1648-1690: pages 133-150; FHL Film# 22344, Item 2, LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as Hayward-Howard genealogy and family history.

Katherine Thayer1

b. 28 September 1779
Father*Ebenezer Thayer1 b. 16 Jul 1734, d. 6 Sep 1792
Mother*Martha Cotton1 b. 30 Nov 1739, d. c 1809
Birth*28 September 1779Katherine Thayer was born on 28 September 1779 in Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.1

Citations

  1. [S1039] Hampton, NH: Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 224. Hereinafter cited as Hampton Vital Records to 1900.

Lydia Thayer1

Father*Cornelius Thayer2 b. 14 Nov 1684, d. 1745
Mother*Lydia Turell2 b. 8 Jul 1683
Marriage*circa 1741She married Josiah Carter circa 1741.2
(Heir) Will9 November 1776The children of Lydia Carter, described as his deceased niece, were named as beneficiaries of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell in his will dated 9 November 1776 in Medford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (Continental Congress). Turell's will gave Lydia (Thayer) Carter's children 40 pounds sterling to be equally divided between them.1

Family

Josiah Carter b. c 1705

Citations

  1. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  2. [S452] The Thayer Families Association Website, online at www.thayerfamilies.com, Richard Thayer, First 5 Generations. Hereinafter cited as Thayer Families Association Website.

Lydia Thayer1

b. 1 January 1744
Father*Nathaniel Thayer1 b. 17 Jul 1710, d. 15 Dec 1786
Mother*Ruth Eliot1 b. 20 Sep 1711, d. 1746
Baptism*1 January 1744Lydia Thayer was baptized on 1 January 1744 at First Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 325. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.

Martha Thayer1

b. 21 April 1771
Father*Ebenezer Thayer1 b. 16 Jul 1734, d. 6 Sep 1792
Mother*Martha Cotton1 b. 30 Nov 1739, d. c 1809
Birth*21 April 1771Martha Thayer was born on 21 April 1771 in Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.1

Citations

  1. [S1039] Hampton, NH: Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 218. Hereinafter cited as Hampton Vital Records to 1900.

Mary Thayer1

b. 16 December 1721
Father*Cornelius Thayer2 b. 14 Nov 1684, d. 1745
Mother*Lydia Turell2 b. 8 Jul 1683
Birth*16 December 1721Mary Thayer was born on 16 December 1721 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute2 March 1780 On 2 March 1780, Nathaniel Thayer, Cornelius Thayer, Samuel Bass, William Andrews, Deborah (Thayer) Whitworth, Hannah (Thayer) Abbott, Christian (Bass) Armstrong, Mary Thayer, Sarah (Thayer) White and Rebecca (Bass) Thomas Fowle, all of Boston and residual legatees resulting from the will of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell, submitted a document to the court addressing their concerns regarding the inequities between the value of silver and gold compared with the value of Continental currency, which had gone through several changes and devaluations during and after the Revolutionary War. In 1780, paper money in the new United States, called Continentals, was worth only about 1/40th of its face value. The document stated their understanding that Simon Tufts Esq. of Medford, as Executor to the last will and testament of Ebenezer Turell, late of Medford, Clerk, was entitled by the will to a legacy of £20, and was by virtue of his Executorship in possession of a sum of silver and gold coin, which according to a law of Massachusetts for regulating the value of silver and god coin, amounted to £503, 15s, 6p. Their petition went on to state that a dispute had arisen between the Executor Simon and several of the legatees regarding whether their legacies ought to be paid in silver and gold or in the present currency of the state. The petition's subscribers recommended that the Executor pay them 2/3 of their legacies in silver and gold, after deducting 1/2 of his own legacy, and that the Executor's other half be paid to himself in paper money. The petition went on to recommend that the £150 allowed the Executor for all his services in settling the estate be paid in paper money. The petition's subscribers, all residual legatees as the children, or their heirs, of Lydia (Turell) Thayer and Christian (Turell) Bass, both of whom were deceased sisters of the late Reverend Turell, agreed to be obligated to the court for the sum of £100,000 in lawful money of the state as protection for the Executor. Their document stated that in the case any debts owed to the estate were recovered which would increase the assets owed to the Executor, they would refund their prorated parts of those debts on the condition that their obligation of £100,000 to the court be voided and of no effect. Their petition concluded with the statement that should they fail to keep their agreement, their obligation would remain in full force and effect.3
(Residual Legatee) Massachusetts Money The pound was the currency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its colonial predecessors until 1793. Like the British pound sterling of that era, the Massachusetts pound was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence, but the Massachusetts and British pounds were not equivalent in value. British and other foreign coins were widely circulated in Massachusetts, supplemented by locally-produced coins between about 1652 and 1682 and by local paper money from 1690.

The paper money issued in colonial Massachusetts was denominated in pounds, shillings, and pence. Initially, six shillings were equal to one Spanish dollar. After years of high inflation, in 1749 Massachusetts withdrew its paper money from circulation and returned to money in the form of coin.

After the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, the Continental Congress began issuing paper money known as Continental currency, or Continentals. Continental currency was denominated in dollars from 1/6 of a dollar to $80, including many odd denominations in between. During the Revolution, Congress issued $241,552,780 in Continental currency.

Continental currency depreciated badly during the war, giving rise to the famous phrase "not worth a continental". Several factors contributed to the declining value. Monetary policy was not coordinated between Congress and the states which, like Massachusetts, continued to issue too many bills of credit not backed by tangible assets. Congress and the states lacked the will or the means to retire the bills from circulation through taxation or the sale of bonds. Another problem was that the British successfully waged economic warfare by counterfeiting Continentals on a large scale.

By the end of 1778, Continentals retained from 1/5 to 1/7 of their face value. By 1780, the bills were worth 1/40th of face value. Congress attempted to reform the currency by removing the old bills from circulation and issuing new ones, without success. By May 1781, Continentals had become so worthless that they ceased to circulate as money. Benjamin Franklin noted that the depreciation of the currency had, in effect, acted as a tax to pay for the war. In the 1790s, after the ratification of the United States Constitution, Continentals could be exchanged for treasury bonds at 1% of face value. The Massachusetts state currency depreciated greatly and was replaced by the U.S. dollar in 1793.

The painful experience of the runaway inflation and collapse of the Continental dollar prompted the delegates to the Constitutional Convention to include the gold and silver clause into the United States Constitution so that the individual states could not issue bills of credit, or "make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts." This restriction of bills of credit was extended to the Federal Government, as the power to "emit bills" from the Articles of Confederation was abolished, leaving Congress with the power "to borrow money on credit."4,5
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute9 March 1780During the course of the Turell probate, Simon Tufts Esq., Executor, submitted itemized reports to the court accounting for his payments to beneficiaries and the expenses he incurred on estate business. On 9 March 1780, the Executor listed cash paid in the amount of £329, 3s, 8p to the residuary legatees.3

Citations

  1. [S745] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org, page 153. Hereinafter cited as Boston Births, 1700-1800.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 300. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  3. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  4. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_pound. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.
  5. [S225] Wikipedia Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_American_currency

Nathaniel Thayer

b. 11 April 1639, d. 28 March 1728
Father*Richard Thayer b. 5 Apr 1601
Mother*Dorothy Mortimore
Baptism*11 April 1639Nathaniel Tayer was baptized on 11 April 1639 at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England. His Godparents were Thomas Dymrie and Edward Dymrie as Godfathers and Aldgail(sic) Perlene as Godmother.1
(Son) Immigrationcirca 1641Shortly after the death of his mother, Nathaniel Thayer immigrated with his father and seven siblings in circa 1641 to America with his eight children. The family settled in Braintree, Massachusetts following Richard's older brother, Thomas Thayer, who had immigrated in 1637 with his family and also settled in Braintree.2,3
Marriage*circa 1669He married Deborah Townsend circa 1669.3
Death*28 March 1728He died on 28 March 1728 in Boston at age 88.4

Family

Deborah Townsend
Child1.Cornelius Thayer+3,5 b. 14 Nov 1684, d. 1745

Citations

  1. [S458] Walter Faxon, Edward Henry Whorf and introduction and notes by Henry Ernest Woods, "Tayer (Thayer) Family Entries in the Parish Registry of Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England", New England Historical & Genealogical Register Volume 60 (July 1906): page 286. Hereinafter cited as "Tayer (Thayer) in Thornbury Parish Records - NEHGR."
  2. [S458] Walter Faxon, Edward Henry Whorf and introduction and notes by Henry Ernest Woods, "Tayer (Thayer) in Thornbury Parish Records - NEHGR", page 284 footnote.
  3. [S452] The Thayer Families Association Website, online at www.thayerfamilies.com, Richard Thayer, First 5 Generations. Hereinafter cited as Thayer Families Association Website.
  4. [S748] Find a Grave website, including some cemetery and tombstone photos obtained from site, online at www.findagrave.com, Nathaniel Thayer, Memorial# 65470799, created by Marc Thayer III. Hereinafter cited as Find a Grave website.
  5. [S1034] Boston MA: Births, Baptisms, Marriages, and Deaths, 1630-1699, online at www.americanancestors.org, City Document No. 130, page 164. Hereinafter cited as Boston Births, Baptisms, Marriages, Deaths, 1630-1699.

Nathaniel Thayer1

b. 17 July 1710, d. 15 December 1786
Father*Cornelius Thayer1 b. 14 Nov 1684, d. 1745
Mother*Lydia Turell1 b. 8 Jul 1683
Birth*17 July 1710Nathaniel Thayer was born on 17 July 1710 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1
Marriage*8 May 1733He married Ruth Eliot, daughter of Andrew Eliot and Ruth Symonds, on 8 May 1733 at First Church, Boston. They were married by the Reverend Thomas Foxwood.2,3
(Husband) Death1746Nathaniel became a widower when Ruth (Eliot) Thayer died in 1746.4
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute2 March 1780 On 2 March 1780, Nathaniel Thayer, Cornelius Thayer, Samuel Bass, William Andrews, Deborah (Thayer) Whitworth, Hannah (Thayer) Abbott, Christian (Bass) Armstrong, Mary Thayer, Sarah (Thayer) White and Rebecca (Bass) Thomas Fowle, all of Boston and residual legatees resulting from the will of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell, submitted a document to the court addressing their concerns regarding the inequities between the value of silver and gold compared with the value of Continental currency, which had gone through several changes and devaluations during and after the Revolutionary War. In 1780, paper money in the new United States, called Continentals, was worth only about 1/40th of its face value. The document stated their understanding that Simon Tufts Esq. of Medford, as Executor to the last will and testament of Ebenezer Turell, late of Medford, Clerk, was entitled by the will to a legacy of £20, and was by virtue of his Executorship in possession of a sum of silver and gold coin, which according to a law of Massachusetts for regulating the value of silver and god coin, amounted to £503, 15s, 6p. Their petition went on to state that a dispute had arisen between the Executor Simon and several of the legatees regarding whether their legacies ought to be paid in silver and gold or in the present currency of the state. The petition's subscribers recommended that the Executor pay them 2/3 of their legacies in silver and gold, after deducting 1/2 of his own legacy, and that the Executor's other half be paid to himself in paper money. The petition went on to recommend that the £150 allowed the Executor for all his services in settling the estate be paid in paper money. The petition's subscribers, all residual legatees as the children, or their heirs, of Lydia (Turell) Thayer and Christian (Turell) Bass, both of whom were deceased sisters of the late Reverend Turell, agreed to be obligated to the court for the sum of £100,000 in lawful money of the state as protection for the Executor. Their document stated that in the case any debts owed to the estate were recovered which would increase the assets owed to the Executor, they would refund their prorated parts of those debts on the condition that their obligation of £100,000 to the court be voided and of no effect. Their petition concluded with the statement that should they fail to keep their agreement, their obligation would remain in full force and effect.5
(Residual Legatee) Massachusetts Money The pound was the currency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its colonial predecessors until 1793. Like the British pound sterling of that era, the Massachusetts pound was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence, but the Massachusetts and British pounds were not equivalent in value. British and other foreign coins were widely circulated in Massachusetts, supplemented by locally-produced coins between about 1652 and 1682 and by local paper money from 1690.

The paper money issued in colonial Massachusetts was denominated in pounds, shillings, and pence. Initially, six shillings were equal to one Spanish dollar. After years of high inflation, in 1749 Massachusetts withdrew its paper money from circulation and returned to money in the form of coin.

After the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, the Continental Congress began issuing paper money known as Continental currency, or Continentals. Continental currency was denominated in dollars from 1/6 of a dollar to $80, including many odd denominations in between. During the Revolution, Congress issued $241,552,780 in Continental currency.

Continental currency depreciated badly during the war, giving rise to the famous phrase "not worth a continental". Several factors contributed to the declining value. Monetary policy was not coordinated between Congress and the states which, like Massachusetts, continued to issue too many bills of credit not backed by tangible assets. Congress and the states lacked the will or the means to retire the bills from circulation through taxation or the sale of bonds. Another problem was that the British successfully waged economic warfare by counterfeiting Continentals on a large scale.

By the end of 1778, Continentals retained from 1/5 to 1/7 of their face value. By 1780, the bills were worth 1/40th of face value. Congress attempted to reform the currency by removing the old bills from circulation and issuing new ones, without success. By May 1781, Continentals had become so worthless that they ceased to circulate as money. Benjamin Franklin noted that the depreciation of the currency had, in effect, acted as a tax to pay for the war. In the 1790s, after the ratification of the United States Constitution, Continentals could be exchanged for treasury bonds at 1% of face value. The Massachusetts state currency depreciated greatly and was replaced by the U.S. dollar in 1793.

The painful experience of the runaway inflation and collapse of the Continental dollar prompted the delegates to the Constitutional Convention to include the gold and silver clause into the United States Constitution so that the individual states could not issue bills of credit, or "make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts." This restriction of bills of credit was extended to the Federal Government, as the power to "emit bills" from the Articles of Confederation was abolished, leaving Congress with the power "to borrow money on credit."6,7
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute9 March 1780During the course of the Turell probate, Simon Tufts Esq., Executor, submitted itemized reports to the court accounting for his payments to beneficiaries and the expenses he incurred on estate business. On 9 March 1780, the Executor listed cash paid in the amount of £329, 3s, 8p to the residuary legatees.5
Death*15 December 1786He died on 15 December 1786 in Boston at age 76.8

Family

Ruth Eliot b. 20 Sep 1711, d. 1746
Children1.Ebenezer Thayer+9,4 b. 16 Jul 1734, d. 6 Sep 1792
2.Nathaniel Thayer10 b. 2 May 1736
3.Catharine Thayer11 b. 12 Jun 1737
4.Nathaniel Thayer12 b. 4 Feb 1739
5.Ruth Thayer13 b. 8 Aug 1742
6.Lydia Thayer14 b. 1 Jan 1744
7.Deborah Thayer15 b. 1 Dec 1745

Citations

  1. [S745] Boston Births, 1700-1800, online at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org, City Document No. 43, page 71. Hereinafter cited as Boston Births, 1700-1800.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 396. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  3. [S746] Boston, Massachusetts Marriages, 1700-1809, online at www.americanancestors.org, City Document No. 150, page 188. Hereinafter cited as Boston Marriages, 1700-1809.
  4. [S452] The Thayer Families Association Website, online at www.thayerfamilies.com, Richard Thayer, First 5 Generations. Hereinafter cited as Thayer Families Association Website.
  5. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  6. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_pound. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.
  7. [S225] Wikipedia Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_American_currency
  8. [S948] Boston Deaths, 1700-1799, online at www.americanancestors.org, citing the Massachusetts Centinel Semi Weekly of 16 Dec 1786. Hereinafter cited as Boston Deaths, 1700-1799.
  9. [S979] Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, online at www.ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988.
  10. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 315.
  11. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 317.
  12. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 319.
  13. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 323.
  14. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 325.
  15. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 327.

Nathaniel Thayer1

b. 11 September 1808, d. 7 March 1883
Father*Reverend Nathaniel Thayer1 b. 11 Jul 1769, d. 23 Jun 1840
Birth*11 September 1808Nathaniel Thayer was born on 11 September 1808 in Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.1
Association*27 March 1869Nathaniel was a life member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, whose connection with the society dated from 27 March 1869.1
Death*7 March 1883He died on 7 March 1883 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at age 74.1

Citations

  1. [S1022] Rev. Increase N. Tarbox, "Necrology of the New-England Historic Genealogical Society (Nathaniel Thayer A.M.)", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 37 (October 1883): page 413. Hereinafter cited as "Nathaniel Thayer Necrology."

Nathaniel Thayer1

b. 2 May 1736
Father*Nathaniel Thayer1 b. 17 Jul 1710, d. 15 Dec 1786
Mother*Ruth Eliot1 b. 20 Sep 1711, d. 1746
Baptism*2 May 1736Nathaniel Thayer was baptized on 2 May 1736 at First Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 315. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.

Nathaniel Thayer1

b. 4 February 1739
Father*Nathaniel Thayer1 b. 17 Jul 1710, d. 15 Dec 1786
Mother*Ruth Eliot1 b. 20 Sep 1711, d. 1746
Baptism*4 February 1739Nathaniel Thayer was baptized on 4 February 1739 at First Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 319. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.

Reverend Nathaniel Thayer1

b. 11 July 1769, d. 23 June 1840
Father*Ebenezer Thayer1,2 b. 16 Jul 1734, d. 6 Sep 1792
Mother*Martha Cotton1,2 b. 30 Nov 1739, d. c 1809
Birth*11 July 1769Reverend Nathaniel Thayer was born on 11 July 1769 in Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.1,2
Education*1789Nathaniel graduated from Harvard College, Boston, in 17891
Residence*26 August 1793 and was settled in Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, by 26 August 1793.1
Death*23 June 1840He died on 23 June 1840 in Lancaster at age 70.1

Family

Child1.Nathaniel Thayer1 b. 11 Sep 1808, d. 7 Mar 1883

Citations

  1. [S1022] Rev. Increase N. Tarbox, "Necrology of the New-England Historic Genealogical Society (Nathaniel Thayer A.M.)", New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 37 (October 1883): page 413. Hereinafter cited as "Nathaniel Thayer Necrology."
  2. [S1039] Hampton, NH: Vital Records to 1900, online at www.americanancestors.org, Volume 1, page 216. Hereinafter cited as Hampton Vital Records to 1900.

Richard Thayer1

b. 5 April 1601
Father*Richard Tayer1
Baptism*5 April 1601Richard Tayer was baptized [on D] at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England. His Godparents were Richard Dimery and Nicholas Tayer as Godfathers and Elizabeth Grifling as Godmother.1
Marriage*5 April 1624He married Dorothy Mortimore on 5 April 1624 in Thornbury, Gloucestershire.2
Immigration*circa 1641After the death of his wife, Richard Thayer immigrated in circa 1641 to America with his eight children. The family settled in Braintree, Massachusetts following Richard's older brother, Thomas Thayer, who had immigrated in 1637 with his family and also settled in Braintree.3,4

Family

Dorothy Mortimore
Children1.Jael Thayer+5 b. 2 Jun 1633, d. 10 Mar 1701
2.Deborah Thayer5 b. 27 Mar 1634, d. 31 May 1662
3.Nathaniel Thayer+ b. 11 Apr 1639, d. 28 Mar 1728

Citations

  1. [S458] Walter Faxon, Edward Henry Whorf and introduction and notes by Henry Ernest Woods, "Tayer (Thayer) Family Entries in the Parish Registry of Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England", New England Historical & Genealogical Register Volume 60 (July 1906): page 284. Hereinafter cited as "Tayer (Thayer) in Thornbury Parish Records - NEHGR."
  2. [S458] Walter Faxon, Edward Henry Whorf and introduction and notes by Henry Ernest Woods, "Tayer (Thayer) in Thornbury Parish Records - NEHGR", page 287.
  3. [S458] Walter Faxon, Edward Henry Whorf and introduction and notes by Henry Ernest Woods, "Tayer (Thayer) in Thornbury Parish Records - NEHGR", page 284 footnote.
  4. [S452] The Thayer Families Association Website, online at www.thayerfamilies.com, Richard Thayer, First 5 Generations. Hereinafter cited as Thayer Families Association Website.
  5. [S458] Walter Faxon, Edward Henry Whorf and introduction and notes by Henry Ernest Woods, "Tayer (Thayer) in Thornbury Parish Records - NEHGR", page 286.

Ruth Thayer1

(Applicant) Religion29 March 1805Zilpah Bolton and Nathaniel Everett, along with eight others which included George Briggs Cox, Peter Vallett, John Woodward, Lydia Sweetser, Sally Lovis, Mary Marnson, Ruth Thayer and Venus Sylvester, applied for membership in the Second Baptist Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at a Friday evening meeting on 29 March 1805. The applicants spoke "with regard to works of grace upon their souls and after a candid and full examination, they were unanimously received into the fellowship as Candidates for baptism."2
(Member) Religion31 March 1805Zilpah Bolton and Nathaniel Everett, along with several others including Thomas Ditson, John Hayden, George Briggs Cox, Simeon Blanchard, Francis Green, Peter Vallett, John Woodward, Mary Marnson, Ruth Thayer, Venus Sylvester, Kezia Booth, Lydia Leeds, Botsey Jones, Versan Adams, Zebudah Hayden, Martha Farrar, Betsey Mirth Horton, Catherine Thayer, Lydia Sweetser and Sally Lovis, were baptized and became members of the Second Baptist Church, Boston, on Sunday, 31 March 1805. In the baptismal records, the men and women were listed separately.3,4,5

Citations

  1. [S893] Records of the Second Baptist Church, Boston, 1788-1809, original manuscript, Reference Item# 26, Franklin Trask Library, 210 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, MA, pages 114 and 118.
  2. [S893] Records of the Second Baptist Church, Boston, 1788-1809, original manuscript, Franklin Trask Library, page 114.
  3. [S893] Records of the Second Baptist Church, Boston, 1788-1809, original manuscript, Franklin Trask Library, page 118.
  4. [S183] Boston, Massachusetts, Church Records, 1789-1811; FHL# 856700 Item# 5, LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as Second Baptist Church Records, 1789-1811.
  5. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.

Ruth Thayer1

b. 8 August 1742
Father*Nathaniel Thayer1 b. 17 Jul 1710, d. 15 Dec 1786
Mother*Ruth Eliot1 b. 20 Sep 1711, d. 1746
Baptism*8 August 1742Ruth Thayer was baptized on 8 August 1742 at First Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 323. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.

Sarah Thayer1

Marriage*6 May 1663She married Jonathan Hayward, son of William Hayward and Margery ______, on 6 May 1663.1

Family

Jonathan Hayward b. c 1641, d. 21 Nov 1690
Children1.Deacon Jonathan Hayward+1 b. 1668, d. 1757
2.Huldah Hayward+1 b. 1672

Citations

  1. [S869] Marcus Taft Jones, Hayward-Howard genealogy and family history: descendants of William and Margery Hayward of Braintree, Massachusetts, 1648; earlier of Weymouth. Microfilm of typescript at the Rhode Island Historical Society in Providence, Rhode Island. Hayward genealogy 1648-1690: pages 1-13; FHL Film# 22344, Item 2, LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as Hayward-Howard genealogy and family history.

Sarah Thayer1

Marriage*1726She married John Hayward, son of William Hayward and Esther Harbor, in 1726.1

Family

John Hayward b. 1700, d. 1735

Citations

  1. [S869] Marcus Taft Jones, Hayward-Howard genealogy and family history: descendants of William and Margery Hayward of Braintree, Massachusetts, 1648; earlier of Weymouth. Microfilm of typescript at the Rhode Island Historical Society in Providence, Rhode Island. Hayward genealogy 1648-1690: pages 133-150; FHL Film# 22344, Item 2, LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as Hayward-Howard genealogy and family history.

Sarah Thayer1

b. 1732
Father*Cornelius Thayer2 b. 14 Nov 1684, d. 1745
Mother*Lydia Turell2 b. 8 Jul 1683
Birth*1732Sarah Thayer was born in 1732.1
Marriage*She married Captain John White.1
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute2 March 1780 On 2 March 1780, Nathaniel Thayer, Cornelius Thayer, Samuel Bass, William Andrews, Deborah (Thayer) Whitworth, Hannah (Thayer) Abbott, Christian (Bass) Armstrong, Mary Thayer, Sarah (Thayer) White and Rebecca (Bass) Thomas Fowle, all of Boston and residual legatees resulting from the will of the Reverend Ebenezer Turell, submitted a document to the court addressing their concerns regarding the inequities between the value of silver and gold compared with the value of Continental currency, which had gone through several changes and devaluations during and after the Revolutionary War. In 1780, paper money in the new United States, called Continentals, was worth only about 1/40th of its face value. The document stated their understanding that Simon Tufts Esq. of Medford, as Executor to the last will and testament of Ebenezer Turell, late of Medford, Clerk, was entitled by the will to a legacy of £20, and was by virtue of his Executorship in possession of a sum of silver and gold coin, which according to a law of Massachusetts for regulating the value of silver and god coin, amounted to £503, 15s, 6p. Their petition went on to state that a dispute had arisen between the Executor Simon and several of the legatees regarding whether their legacies ought to be paid in silver and gold or in the present currency of the state. The petition's subscribers recommended that the Executor pay them 2/3 of their legacies in silver and gold, after deducting 1/2 of his own legacy, and that the Executor's other half be paid to himself in paper money. The petition went on to recommend that the £150 allowed the Executor for all his services in settling the estate be paid in paper money. The petition's subscribers, all residual legatees as the children, or their heirs, of Lydia (Turell) Thayer and Christian (Turell) Bass, both of whom were deceased sisters of the late Reverend Turell, agreed to be obligated to the court for the sum of £100,000 in lawful money of the state as protection for the Executor. Their document stated that in the case any debts owed to the estate were recovered which would increase the assets owed to the Executor, they would refund their prorated parts of those debts on the condition that their obligation of £100,000 to the court be voided and of no effect. Their petition concluded with the statement that should they fail to keep their agreement, their obligation would remain in full force and effect.3
(Residual Legatee) Massachusetts Money The pound was the currency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its colonial predecessors until 1793. Like the British pound sterling of that era, the Massachusetts pound was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence, but the Massachusetts and British pounds were not equivalent in value. British and other foreign coins were widely circulated in Massachusetts, supplemented by locally-produced coins between about 1652 and 1682 and by local paper money from 1690.

The paper money issued in colonial Massachusetts was denominated in pounds, shillings, and pence. Initially, six shillings were equal to one Spanish dollar. After years of high inflation, in 1749 Massachusetts withdrew its paper money from circulation and returned to money in the form of coin.

After the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, the Continental Congress began issuing paper money known as Continental currency, or Continentals. Continental currency was denominated in dollars from 1/6 of a dollar to $80, including many odd denominations in between. During the Revolution, Congress issued $241,552,780 in Continental currency.

Continental currency depreciated badly during the war, giving rise to the famous phrase "not worth a continental". Several factors contributed to the declining value. Monetary policy was not coordinated between Congress and the states which, like Massachusetts, continued to issue too many bills of credit not backed by tangible assets. Congress and the states lacked the will or the means to retire the bills from circulation through taxation or the sale of bonds. Another problem was that the British successfully waged economic warfare by counterfeiting Continentals on a large scale.

By the end of 1778, Continentals retained from 1/5 to 1/7 of their face value. By 1780, the bills were worth 1/40th of face value. Congress attempted to reform the currency by removing the old bills from circulation and issuing new ones, without success. By May 1781, Continentals had become so worthless that they ceased to circulate as money. Benjamin Franklin noted that the depreciation of the currency had, in effect, acted as a tax to pay for the war. In the 1790s, after the ratification of the United States Constitution, Continentals could be exchanged for treasury bonds at 1% of face value. The Massachusetts state currency depreciated greatly and was replaced by the U.S. dollar in 1793.

The painful experience of the runaway inflation and collapse of the Continental dollar prompted the delegates to the Constitutional Convention to include the gold and silver clause into the United States Constitution so that the individual states could not issue bills of credit, or "make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts." This restriction of bills of credit was extended to the Federal Government, as the power to "emit bills" from the Articles of Confederation was abolished, leaving Congress with the power "to borrow money on credit."4,5
(Residual Legatee) Probate Dispute9 March 1780During the course of the Turell probate, Simon Tufts Esq., Executor, submitted itemized reports to the court accounting for his payments to beneficiaries and the expenses he incurred on estate business. On 9 March 1780, the Executor listed cash paid in the amount of £329, 3s, 8p to the residuary legatees.3

Citations

  1. [S1067] Patricia Thayer Muno, Descendants of Richard Thayer, Immigrant to America 1641, through the 19th Century, downloaded from the Family History Library at www.familysearch.org. (Beaverton, Oregon: Desktop Publishing, 1992), Descendants of Richard Thayer, page 131. Hereinafter cited as Descendants of Richard Thayer.
  2. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 300. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.
  3. [S485] Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (886 microfilm reels of original records in the Middlesex County Courthouse, Cambridge, Massachusetts), LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Ebenezer Turell 1778 probate packet# 23046, FHL Film# 421543. Hereinafter cited as Probate Records 1648-1924, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  4. [S225] Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_pound. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia Encyclopedia.
  5. [S225] Wikipedia Encyclopedia, online at www.wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_American_currency

Sarah Thayer1

b. 3 May 1725
Birth*3 May 1725Sarah Thayer was born on 3 May 1725 in Mendon, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).2
Marriage*19 April 1750She married Benoni Wight, son of Nathaniel Wight and Ruth Hawes, on 19 April 1750 in Wrentham, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Family

Benoni Wight b. 1 Sep 1721, d. 10 Sep 1775

Citations

  1. [S1240] Raymond Gordon Hawes, The Edward Hawes Heirs : Edward Hawes, ca. 1616-1687, of Dedham, Massachusetts, and his wife, Eliony Lumber : and some of their descendants through eleven generations. Edward Hawes (ca. 1616-1687) was living at Dedham, Massachusetts, by 1648, where he married Eliony Lumber (ca. 1625-1688/9) that year. They had nine children, 1648/9-1666, all born at Dedham. Descendants lived in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, Maine, Vermont, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and elsewhere. Descendants also spell their surname Haws. (Baltimore, Maryland: Gateway Press, 1996), Generation Three, pages 15-27. Hereinafter cited as The Edward Hawes Heirs.
  2. [S1132] Various authors, Mayflower Families Through Five Generations : Volume 20 : Henry Samson in 3 parts. Note: Part 1. Henry Samson by Robert M. Sherman, Ruth W. Sherman & Robert S. Wakefield; Part 2. Revised by Ann T. Reeves, Henry Samson, fifth generation descendants of Henry's son James Samson and daughters Elizabeth Samson Sprout, Hannah Samson Holmes, daughter Samson Hanmore and Dorcas Samson Bonney; Part 3. Fifth generation descendants of Henry sons Stephen and Caleb. (Plymouth, Massachusetts: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1975--), Person No. 32, Elizabeth Samson, Part 1, pages 30-31. Hereinafter cited as Henry Samson of the Mayflower (Five).

Turell Thayer1

b. 20 March 1726
Father*Cornelius Thayer1 b. 14 Nov 1684, d. 1745
Mother*Lydia Turell1 b. 8 Jul 1683
Baptism*20 March 1726Turell Thayer was baptized on 20 March 1726 at First Church, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Province (New England).1

Citations

  1. [S494] Boston MA: Church Records, online at www.newenglandancestors.org, First Church, page 300. Hereinafter cited as Boston MA: Church Records.

Abigail Thomas1

Father*Isaac Thomas1
Mother*Abigail Cushing1 b. 31 Jan 1703/4

Citations

  1. [S842] Robert S. Wakefield, Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Volume 18, Family of Richard Warren. Third Edition, in 3 Parts. (Plymouth, Massachusetts: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2004), Part One, pages 98-99. Hereinafter cited as Mayflower 18: Family of Richard Warren.

Abigail Thomas1

Father*Isaac Thomas1
Mother*Abigail Cushing1 b. 31 Jan 1703/4

Citations

  1. [S842] Robert S. Wakefield, Mayflower Families through Five Generations: Volume 18, Family of Richard Warren. Third Edition, in 3 Parts. (Plymouth, Massachusetts: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2004), Part One, pages 98-99. Hereinafter cited as Mayflower 18: Family of Richard Warren.